Paleo: Should we really be avoiding wheat?

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  1. I find most people who think the gluten thing is a fad also believe that fats in their food are bad for you and that they directly contribute to bodyfat. wrong. we are designed to use fat for energy better than any other fuel source, it's the carb overload that can trick our body into storing the fat. fats keep you fuller longer and as a fun side note, they help your bowels move along better than any amount of fiber ever can.


  2. I,m on day 6 of gluten free, and so far Ive had very little bloating and reflux. Things are looking more solid and normal after a BM. I think I may be headed in the right direction with this....
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  3. Glad I happened on this thread. I'm starting to wonder if I really should try gluten free, or at least decrease it, but I too tend to think it's just "hype" that comes up "all of a sudden". For years whole grains were the way to go, and you have bodybuilder-types and fitness models, athletes, etc. talking on the benefits of whole grains vs refined carbs -especially brown rice vs white rice, so I'm REALLY surprised to see some guys here actually suggesting white rice to be better for you! What about the whole high Glycemic Index of white rice -and other white carbs- and insulin spiking and fat storage (except after a workout of course)- ?

    And indeed, what are reasonable and PRACTICAL alternatives to gluten/breads? I tend to try to have healthy (at least I THOUGHT they were healthy) sandwiches as snacks or meals; what do I do as a reasonable and CONVENIENT alternative?? (You can't make a sandwich without *Bread* can you??? ....sorry for the cheekiness.. ).

    But I'm really interested in this thread, and what are good alternatives. I've started to wonder if certain symptoms I'm having might really be due to gluten sensitivity or what -but the symptoms seem inconsistent. Can I be only sensitive "sometimes"? Or perhaps only with a certain *amount* of gluten/wheat ingested?

    P.S. Someone mentioned Oats as an alternative but I'm sure I've seen oats being described as also having gluten; can anyone confirm this? I could be wrong......

    Thanks.

    Bling

  4. White rice is easier to digest than brown as it is a simpler protein. Brown has more fiber and phytic acids which are not good in this case as grain fibers do not help your stomach and phytic acids reduce absorption of other minerals (antinutrients). I have noticed for many years that brown rice somehow did not sit as well with me as white did. As said above, there's a reason the asians have been eating it white for thousands of years

    We often use Gluten to refer to the protein in any grain, but there are different proteins in different grains at different amounts. For example Oats *can* be ok for some people in some cases..if you want oats you should go for steel cut and make sure it says gluten free. livestrong.com/article/366274-do-steel-cut-oats-contain-gluten/

    As for alternatives..really you're best just getting used to not eating things that resemble grains in my opinion. That said, you can still get gluten free bread for your sandwich. But at first I recommend going cold turkey and seeing how you feel. If I want something resembling a sandwich I just use lettuce leaves as a wrap

  5. Quinoa is a pretty unadulterated grain that is gluten free.

    As RockNrolla mentioned the shift should really be toward fresh, minimally processed foods, rather than finding highly processed foods to substitute for wheat based products.

    Br
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by RockNRollaX View Post
    White rice is easier to digest than brown as it is a simpler protein. Brown has more fiber and phytic acids which are not good in this case as grain fibers do not help your stomach and phytic acids reduce absorption of other minerals (antinutrients). I have noticed for many years that brown rice somehow did not sit as well with me as white did. As said above, there's a reason the asians have been eating it white for thousands of years

    We often use Gluten to refer to the protein in any grain, but there are different proteins in different grains at different amounts. For example Oats *can* be ok for some people in some cases..if you want oats you should go for steel cut and make sure it says gluten free. livestrong.com/article/366274-do-steel-cut-oats-contain-gluten/

    As for alternatives..really you're best just getting used to not eating things that resemble grains in my opinion. That said, you can still get gluten free bread for your sandwich. But at first I recommend going cold turkey and seeing how you feel. If I want something resembling a sandwich I just use lettuce leaves as a wrap
    I agree.

    Although I do avoid wheat, the main thing is that you opt for foods as they occur (or as close to) in nature.
    Serious Nutrition Solutions Representative
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  7. Ok, well I can see with say going for tubers and such, that makes sense. But in terms of being as close to nature as possible, I thought that was the very point of going for whole grain foods, like brown rice vs white rice? In terms of the greater fiber content yes, but also for better insulin control? (lower Glycemic index)?

  8. Also, what's special about "steel cut" oats? Is it more "whole" than the tough "old fashioned oats"? I had always thought that the old-fashioned oats was the more "whole-some" way to go, for getting in whole grains, for better sustained energy for workouts, general health, etc. ?

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Blingzip View Post
    Also, what's special about "steel cut" oats? Is it more "whole" than the tough "old fashioned oats"? I had always thought that the old-fashioned oats was the more "whole-some" way to go, for getting in whole grains, for better sustained energy for workouts, general health, etc. ?
    Just do it your way bro. Oats are oats everyone has an opinion though. Just eat as healthy as you can afford and you'll do fine

  10. I'm just starting to eat gluten-free oats. Don't notice a different taste or anything, but it's just hard to stay consistent with it.
    iForce Nutrition Representative
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  11. Quote Originally Posted by PuZo View Post
    I'm just starting to eat gluten-free oats. Don't notice a different taste or anything, but it's just hard to stay consistent with it.
    There ahouldnt be any tatse difference.. Oats naturally dont contain gluten but are usually packed in factories on machines that also process gluten products. So the amount is very minuscule
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