The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis

  1. The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis


    Anabolic Effects of Milk v. Soy Proteins
    J Am Coll Nutr. 2009 Aug;28(4):343-54.
    The role of milk- and soy-based protein in support of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion in young and elderly persons.
    Phillips SM, Tang JE, Moore DR.
    Source

    Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, CANADA. phillis@mcmaster.ca
    Abstract

    The balance between muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown (MPB) is dependent on protein consumption and the accompanying hyperaminoacidemia, which stimulates a marked rise in MPS and mild suppression of MPB. In the fasting state, however, MPS declines sharply and MPB is increased slightly. Ultimately, the balance between MPS and MPB determines the net rate of muscle growth. Accretion of new muscle mass beyond that of normal growth can occur following periods of intense resistance exercise. Such muscle accretion is an often sought-after goal of athletes. There needs to be, however, an increased appreciation of the role that preservation of muscle can play in offsetting morbidities associated with the sarcopenia of aging, such as type 2 diabetes and declines in metabolic rate that can lead to fat mass accumulation followed by the onset or progression of obesity. Emerging evidence shows that consumption of different types of proteins can have different stimulatory effects on the amplitude and possibly duration that MPS is elevated after feeding; this may be particularly significant after resistance exercise. This effect may be due to differences in the fundamental amino acid composition of the protein (i.e., its amino acid score) and its rate of digestion. Milk proteins, specifically casein and whey, are the highest quality proteins and are quite different in terms of their rates of digestion and absorption. New data suggest that whey protein is better able to support MPS than is soy protein, a finding that may explain the greater ability of whey protein to support greater net muscle mass gains with resistance exercise. This review focuses on evidence showing the differences in responses of MPS, and ultimately muscle protein accretion, to consumption of milk- and soy-based supplemental protein sources in humans.

    PMID: 20368372
    Full Text here = http://www.jacn.org/content/28/4/343.long
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates


  2. Good read. Thanks

  3. Nice, i recently removed regular milk from my diet and added almond milk
    toes-on-the-nose.blogspot.com Deployed blogging
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  4. Quote Originally Posted by Outside Backer View Post
    Nice, i recently removed regular milk from my diet and added almond milk
    I dont drink milk anymore myself however I still use whey shakes ( cheap and convenient). Unsweetened vanilla almond milk is good stuff.. I also use coconut milk to from time to time.
    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

  5. Almond milk and coconut milk are great substitutes. I can't handle regular milk as I am very sensitive to casien protein. Whey I can do though.

    Nice article again JJ. Reps
    RecoverBro ELITE

  6. I never drink milk, can't stand it. Do soymilk w/ my whey shakes and unsweetened almond milk with casein before bed. Def eats tons of cottage cheese, though. Just something about drinking milk I can't stand!

  7. I love me some milk!!!

  8. it's always so weird to see someone say they don't like milk.


    milk is awesome. I've read several places that a combination of whey and casein is optimal post workout because casein protein is anti catabolic and whey is anabolic. not to mention it tastes great
    http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500368_162-1342839.html

    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/res...ch-review.html

    Milk consumption acutely increases muscle protein synthesis, leading to an improved net muscle protein balance. Furthermore, when post-exercise milk consumption is combined with resistance training (12 weeks minimum), greater increases in muscle hypertrophy and lean mass have been observed.
    For me, the action IS the juice.

  9. I really like the studies you share Judo. Keep it up. Adds a lot more to the forum than the millionth "how do I get my abs cut up?"

  10. Just read the articles, I'm curious to see if my post w/o shake would really give me more benefit w/ 8oz of skim milk or 1% vs 8oz of light soy. I might try for a bit and see. It can't be that bad as long as it's mixed with all the stuff I put in there.

  11. ehh brah's how do i get my ab's cut up?

  12. i drink 2 gallons in 5 days when i'm upping my protein. i loves some milk. can't stand soy milk though.

  13. I don't understand that how the guys avoid milk or hate the milk. Now a days it's available in many flavors. And if you are a sports person then you should have to have milk as your daily energy drink. It helps me a lot in building my health and muscles.

  14. a gallon of milk last just over a day for me

  15. Nice...Thanks for this. Good Read indeed

  16. This is good stuff. I just did a peer reviewed article presentation in my Bio class on protein synthesis Soy vs. Casein. Thanks for posting!

  17. I LOVEE me some milk. Skim too!! Back before dieting, I used to alternate cause I like both but consistently drinking skim then going back to 2%.....goodness.. It's something special. I've found that even skim milk has been contributing too many cals to my cut though so a half gallon lasts me 3-4 days now as opposed to a gallong every 2-3 days haha.
  

  
 

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