Cooking steak / red meat

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    Cooking steak / red meat


    Hey guys just wondering if there's any issues with cooking steal either rare or well done ??? Are there any risk or benefits in the way it's cooked ???

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    Only thing I am aware of is there is always the potential for getting sick when eating uncooked food.
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    I've always eaten my steak medium to medium rare and never gotten sick. Generally as long as the beef is within it's sell by date and smells and looks fresh you're fine to cook it rare. If you cook a steak well done its just dryer and tougher and hence has less nutrition than a juicy medium rare steak. Protein would not be affected though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOSSisback82
    I've always eaten my steak medium to medium rare and never gotten sick. Generally as long as the beef is within it's sell by date and smells and looks fresh you're fine to cook it rare. If you cook a steak well done its just dryer and tougher and hence has less nutrition than a juicy medium rare steak. Protein would not be affected though.
    I always wondered about the nutrition but good to know protein stays the same.

    I like mine more on the well done side of things
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    Yeah my main concern was the protein and nutrient content as I thought the longer you cook it you would destroy the nutrient content
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    i think the more well done a steak is the more fat gets cooked out of it.
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    the longer you cook it the more carcinogens from the grill
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    Always eat my steaks and hamburgers rare, bleeding out all over my plate. Never a problem.
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    I eat mine raw to rare.

    The longer you cook meat, especially red meat, the more advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced. These AGEs are linked to cancer and vascular disease.

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    Just make sure it's within it's sell by date and/or doesn't have a weird color or smell to it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLF84 View Post
    Hey guys just wondering if there's any issues with cooking steal either rare or well done ??? Are there any risk or benefits in the way it's cooked ???
    General rule of thumb when cooking steak is the lower the quality cut of steak(skirt,flat iron, etc) the higher the temp of cooking(med well etc.) If your cooking premium choice cuts of steak(filet strip rib eye) med rare to medium is usually suggested for best flavor
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    Well obviously if its undercooked you risk getting food poisoning but behond that the way its cooked is your personal preference
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    Quote Originally Posted by LdLax236 View Post
    Well obviously if its undercooked you risk getting food poisoning but behond that the way its cooked is your personal preference
    Obviously you skipped my post about the more done the meat the higher the risk of cancer via advanced glycation and hetrocyclic amines.

    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Nov;17(11):3098-107.
    Red meat intake, doneness, polymorphisms in genes that encode carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes, and colorectal cancer risk.

    Cotterchio M, Boucher BA, Manno M, Gallinger S, Okey AB, Harper PA.
    Source

    Population Studies and Surveillance, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 2L7. michelle.cotterchio@cancercare .on.ca

    Abstract

    Colorectal cancer literature regarding the interaction between polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and red meat intake/doneness is inconsistent. A case-control study was conducted to evaluate the interaction between red meat consumption, doneness, and polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. Colorectal cancer cases diagnosed 1997 to 2000, ages 20 to 74 years, were identified through the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry and recruited by the Ontario Family Colorectal Cancer Registry. Controls were sex-matched and age group-matched random sample of Ontario population. Epidemiologic and food questionnaires were completed by 1,095 cases and 1,890 controls; blood was provided by 842 and 1,251, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates. Increased red meat intake was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk [OR (> 5 versus < or = 2 servings/wk), 1.67 (1.36-2.05)]. Colorectal cancer risk also increased significantly with well-done meat intake [OR (> 2 servings/wk well-done versus < or = 2 servings/wk rare-regular), 1.57 (1.27-1.93)]. We evaluated interactions between genetic variants in 15 enzymes involved in the metabolism of carcinogens in overcooked meat (cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, SULT, NAT, mEH, and AHR). CYP2C9 and NAT2 variants were associated with colorectal cancer risk. Red meat intake was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk regardless of genotypes; however, CYP1B1 combined variant and SULT1A1-638G>A variant significantly modified the association between red meat doneness intake and colorectal cancer risk. In conclusion, well-done red meat intake was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer regardless of carcinogen-metabolizing genotype, although our data suggest that persons with CYP1B1 and SULT1A1 variants had the highest colorectal cancer risk.


    PMID:18990750 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    PMCID: PMC2751598Free PMC Article
    Nutr Cancer. 2011 May;63(4):525-37.
    Meat consumption, cooking practices, meat mutagens, and risk of prostate cancer.

    John EM, Stern MC, Sinha R, Koo J.
    Source

    Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California 94538, USA. esther.john@CPIC.org

    Abstract

    Consumption of red meat, particularly well-done meat, has been associated with increased prostate cancer risk. High-temperature cooking methods such as grilling and barbecuing may produce heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are known carcinogens. We assessed the association with meat consumption and estimated HCA and PAH exposure in a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed cases aged 40-79 years (531 advanced cases, 195 localized cases) and 527 controls were asked about dietary intake, including usual meat cooking methods and doneness levels. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. For advanced prostate cancer, but not localized disease, increased risks were associated with higher consumption of hamburgers (OR = 1.79, CI = 1.10-2.92), processed meat (OR = 1.57, CI = 1.04-2.36), grilled red meat (OR = 1.63, CI = 0.99-2.68), and well-done red meat (OR = 1.52, CI = 0.93-2.46), and intermediate intake of 2-amino-1-methyl1-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (Quartile 2 vs. 1: OR = 1.41, CI = 0.98-2.01; Quartile 3 vs. 1: OR = 1.42, CI = 0.98-2.04), but not for higher intake. White meat consumption was not associated with prostate cancer. These findings provide further evidence that consumption of processed meat and red meat cooked at high temperature is associated with increased risk of advanced, but not localized, prostate cancer.


    PMID:21526454 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    Cancer Res. 2005 Dec 15;65(24):11779-84.
    A prospective study of meat and meat mutagens and prostate cancer risk.

    Cross AJ, Peters U, Kirsh VA, Andriole GL, Reding D, Hayes RB, Sinha R.
    Source

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. crossa@mail.nih.gov

    Abstract

    High-temperature cooked meat contains heterocyclic amines, including 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). In rodents, a high intake of PhIP induces prostate tumors. We prospectively investigated the association between meat and meat mutagens, specifically PhIP, and prostate cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Diet was assessed using a 137-item food frequency questionnaire and a detailed meat-cooking questionnaire linked to a database for BaP and the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-b]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx), and PhIP. During follow-up, we ascertained a total of 1,338 prostate cancer cases among 29,361 men; of these, 868 were incident cases (diagnosed after the first year of follow-up) and 520 were advanced cases (stage III or IV or a Gleason score of > or =7). Total, red, or white meat intake was not associated with prostate cancer risk. More than 10 g/d of very well done meat, compared with no consumption, was associated with a 1.4-fold increased risk of prostate cancer [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-1.92] and a 1.7-fold increased risk (95% CI, 1.19-2.40) of incident disease. Although there was no association with MeIQx and DiMeIQx, the highest quintile of PhIP was associated with a 1.2-fold increased risk of prostate cancer (95% CI, 1.01-1.48) and a 1.3-fold increased risk of incident disease (95% CI, 1.01-1.61). In conclusion, very well done meat was positively associated with prostate cancer risk. In addition, this study lends epidemiologic support to the animal studies, which have implicated PhIP as a prostate carcinogen.


    PMID:16357191 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Free full text
    In simple terms, be a man, protect your prostate to remain a man, and eat your meat rare!

    Br
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    I'd just like to add a note about the fear of eating undercooked meat. I've been eating raw/rare meat my whole 29 years and have never gotten sick from it. My mom also eats it the same way (raw hamburger straight from the package). There are a lot more people out there that eat raw meats as well. My guess (and this is purely a guess) is that even if there were chances of food poisoning, I've worked up an immunity to those bugs. If you want to start eating rare meat, I may suggest a gradual working your way down in steps.

    Me, I'll just keep sopping up the bright red juices on my plate with my bread.
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    Oh Jesus. I am an attorney in the field of foodborne illness law, so this stuff is my forte. You have not worked up an immunity to E. coli or Salmonella. You cannot tell a single thing from visually inspecting or smelling beef. The only way to ENSURE that beef is bacteria-free is to cook it to an internal temperature of 160 (ground beef) or 145 (whole cuts). Aside from that, you need to understand that federal law allows beef manufacturers to sell intact cuts of beef WITH E. coli on the outside. The theory is that the consumer will cook it, killing any potentially harmful bacteria. In other words, the onus is on the consumer. Ground beef, on the other hand, is illegal to sell if it contains E. coli. That doesn't mean it always works out that way, just ask Stephanie Smith: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...pagewanted=all To compound matters, Salmonella isn't even considered an adulterant, so any kind of beef can be sold that is contaminated with it.

    Long story short, it is not a smart idea to go around believing that you can eat whatever you want because you are immune to all deadly bacteria. In fact, it's downright stupid. I would suggest cooking your meat, ESPECIALLY ground beef.

    Quote Originally Posted by kaikara View Post
    I'd just like to add a note about the fear of eating undercooked meat. I've been eating raw/rare meat my whole 29 years and have never gotten sick from it. My mom also eats it the same way (raw hamburger straight from the package). There are a lot more people out there that eat raw meats as well. My guess (and this is purely a guess) is that even if there were chances of food poisoning, I've worked up an immunity to those bugs. If you want to start eating rare meat, I may suggest a gradual working your way down in steps.

    Me, I'll just keep sopping up the bright red juices on my plate with my bread.
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    If all meat is able to be sold like that, then what is your professional explanation on why I (and many other people) have never gotten sick from it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaikara
    If all meat is able to be sold like that, then what is your professional explanation on why I (and many other people) have never gotten sick from it?
    Same explanation as to how my grandfather smoked 2 packs of pamalls for 70 out if his 86 year life and never got cancer lung disease or any thing like that. Lots of variables, some are luckier than others. Doesn't mean that just cause you haven't gotten sick that you won't or someone else can't. Eat how you want, either way it's incorrect to say that the possibility does not exist. Having been in the medical field for the last 12 years I have personally seen people get sick from undercooked food. Same as I have seen people get sick from shellfish like raw oysters yet I eat raw oysters and have yet to be sick myself.
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    Also, ground beef often poses even more of a risk because it is ground up and is handled in more ways more often raises the chances of contamination. As opposed to whole cuts which are more protected by nature and are cooked on the outside pr seared at the least helping to kill contaminates
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    Quote Originally Posted by CopyCat View Post
    Same explanation as to how my grandfather smoked 2 packs of pamalls for 70 out if his 86 year life and never got cancer lung disease or any thing like that. Lots of variables, some are luckier than others. Doesn't mean that just cause you haven't gotten sick that you won't or someone else can't. Eat how you want, either way it's incorrect to say that the possibility does not exist. Having been in the medical field for the last 12 years I have personally seen people get sick from undercooked food. Same as I have seen people get sick from shellfish like raw oysters yet I eat raw oysters and have yet to be sick myself.
    Makes sense.
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    Well, I was raised on a farm and, even today - I butcher probably 10 feral pigs a year (they are plentiful and are a nuisance where I live).

    When you talk about STEAK and SOLID CUTS of red meat ... all you really need to do is sear the hell out of them on the outside. During processing, they can pick up E. Coli and other bacteria - but only on the outside (so searing the outside kills that).

    So I eat my steak medium rare - no problems.

    Hamburger and ground beef - well that is a different animal altogether because it isn't a solid cut - it's ground up chunks. Bacteria can get all the way into it - so it needs to be cooked well to ensure it's all killed.
  

  
 

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