Best carb source post workout

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    Best carb source post workout


    Ive been reading that taking in carbs right after you workout is a way to help absorb protein. How many carbs, where should they come from, how long before I take protein? I should say, hw long should I wait after my carb intake to take in protein?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tshaw024 View Post
    Ive been reading that taking in carbs right after you workout is a way to help absorb protein. How many carbs, where should they come from, how long before I take protein? I should say, hw long should I wait after my carb intake to take in protein?
    You should have a high carbohydrate meal within 30 minutes of finishing training. For optimal recovery, you should aim to consume 1 gram of carbohydrate per kg of body mass (equivalent to 0.45 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body mass) within the first hour post-training and then repeat for either the first 4 hours post exercise or until you resume normal meal patterns. To ensure maximal glycogen replenishment you should have a total carbohydrate intake of 7-12 grams of carbohydrate per kg of body mass (equivalent to 3.18-5.45 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body mass) per day, with your post-training carbohydrate intake contributing towards that. Carbohydrates consumed post-training should be high GI carbohydrates (i.e. simple sugars), but complex carbohydrates can be had as well (Burke, 2006).

    So long as adequate carbohydrates are consumed it does not matter whether you have protein or fat with them re glycogen storage (Burke, 2006).

    Consuming protein with your carbohydrates post-training will help enhance protein synthesis. Either 6-12g of essential amino acids or 10-20g of protein from a high quality source should be consumed with your high carbohydrate meal within 30 minutes of finishing training (Burke, 2006).


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    All good to know, so what food would be a good source for these carbs?
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    Wait a second, if I should have 7-12 grams of carbs for every kilogram I weigh within 4 hours of my workout that would be like 700 carbs post workout. Thats not right. I weigh 215, thats roughly 100 kilograms. 7x100 is 700 (within the 4 hours postworkout) I know thats not right. Your also saying I should basically consume 100 carbs postworkout as well, these numbers are off, aren't they?
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    Quote Originally Posted by tshaw024 View Post
    All good to know, so what food would be a good source for these carbs?
    Simple carbohydrates = fruit, dextrose, etc.

    Complex carbohydrates = oats, kumara, rice, etc.

    Protein = egg whites, chicken, turkey, fish, lean beef, protein powder, etc.


    Quote Originally Posted by tshaw024 View Post
    Wait a second, if I should have 7-12 grams of carbs for every kilogram I weigh within 4 hours of my workout that would be like 700 carbs post workout. Thats not right. I weigh 215, thats roughly 100 kilograms. 7x100 is 700 (within the 4 hours postworkout) I know thats not right. Your also saying I should basically consume 100 carbs postworkout as well, these numbers are off, aren't they?
    It is 7-12 grams of carbohydrates per kg of body mass per DAY, not post-training. These are the recommended numbers re carbohydrate (and protein) intake for athletes post-training and competition for optimal recovery, when training sessions are ~8 hours apart. However, as you're not an athlete then at least 50g of carbohydrates within 30 minutes post-training, ensuring at least 1 gram of carbohydrate per kg of body mass within the first hour post-training. Resume your normal meal routine after that.

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    So someone who does cardio, basketball, football, and 5 days of weight training is not an athlete? I understand 100 grams within an hour post-workout. But your other statistic saying I need 700 grams of carbs post workout is crazy, and nowhere close to right. I appreciate your response to the rest of the question though.
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    700 grams within 8 hours I should say, not just post workout. People don't need that many carbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by tshaw024 View Post
    So someone who does cardio, basketball, football, and 5 days of weight training is not an athlete? I understand 100 grams within an hour post-workout. But your other statistic saying I need 700 grams of carbs post workout is crazy, and nowhere close to right. I appreciate your response to the rest of the question though.
    Quote Originally Posted by tshaw024 View Post
    700 grams within 8 hours I should say, not just post workout. People don't need that many carbs
    Sorry, corrected above. You should be having a DAILY total carbohydrate intake of 7-12 grams of carbohydrate per kg of body mass. Your post-training carbohydrate meals should contribute towards that total daily intake.

    However, the total daily carbohydrate intake should be tailored specifically for each athlete, depending on their training regime, sport requirements, budget, etc.


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    Correct me if i'm wrong - but I do believe that it is also wise to toss in a serving of creatine PWO with those fast digesting carbohydrates. The insulin spike provided from the release of glucose into your bloodstream should shuttle the creatine (as well as the aminos/protein) into your muscles.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDarkHalf View Post
    Correct me if i'm wrong - but I do believe that it is also wise to toss in a serving of creatine PWO with those fast digesting carbohydrates. The insulin spike provided from the release of glucose into your bloodstream should shuttle the creatine (as well as the aminos/protein) into your muscles.
    The OP specifically asked about CARBOHYDRATE intake post-training.

    However coingestion of 75-100g of carbohydrates with creatine HAS been shown to enhance creatine accumulation (Burke, et al., 2006; Green, et al., 1996) - which can be useful if you are loading, to help your muscles reach their creatine threshold faster.

    If you take creatine post-resistance training, then you should be having simple carbohydrates either with or within 15-20 minutes, to aid in recovery.

    Creatine products that have nutrient repartitioning effects (i.e. NeoVar Recomped or Cre-02) can help the absorption and uptake of carbohydrates into the bloodstream and muscle for better recovery. Creatine could potentially make a difference in how fast the muscle glycogen stores are replenished and therefore make a difference in recovery.

    Not everyone doses creatine post-training though, so this is personal preference.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    The OP specifically asked about CARBOHYDRATE intake post-training.

    However coingestion of 75-100g of carbohydrates with creatine HAS been shown to enhance creatine accumulation (Burke, et al., 2006; Green, et al., 1996) - which can be useful if you are loading, to help your muscles reach their creatine threshold faster.

    If you take creatine post-resistance training, then you should be having simple carbohydrates either with or within 15-20 minutes, to aid in recovery.

    Creatine products that have nutrient repartitioning effects (i.e. NeoVar Recomped or Cre-02) can help the absorption and uptake of carbohydrates into the bloodstream and muscle for better recovery. Creatine could potentially make a difference in how fast the muscle glycogen stores are replenished and therefore make a difference in recovery.

    Not everyone doses creatine post-training though, so this is personal preference.


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    Thanks for the response. I know the OP was asking about CHO consumption post exercise, but I thought that bringing up the topic of creatine would be education to the OP.
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    I imagine I would get quite plump eating 795-1362.5 carbs per day.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    You should be having a DAILY total carbohydrate intake of 7-12 grams of carbohydrate per kg of body mass.

    yea, maybe if u wanta become a f**kin fat@ss reeeeaal quick.

    200lbs X .45 = 90 X 7 (low end of your "recommended" amount) = 630g of carbs a day...

    NO.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottabecool View Post
    I imagine I would get quite plump eating 795-1362.5 carbs per day.
    Quote Originally Posted by ccapone1153 View Post
    yea, maybe if u wanta become a f**kin fat@ss reeeeaal quick.

    200lbs X .45 = 90 X 7 (low end of your "recommended" amount) = 630g of carbs a day...

    NO.
    Not necessarily; if you are active enough, then your Maintenance should allow for such daily carbohydrate intake (and FYI, I eat in excess of your 630g of carbohydrates daily and have no problems staying lean).

    These are the recommendations for post-training for an athlete to optimize and maximize their performance (Burke, 2006).

    Serious competitive athletes at the top level (and even national level for their countries) eat as such and you do not see them being "plump" or a "fat@ss". The leanest people (who are also coincidentally athletes) in the world have very high-calorie diets that include high carbohydrate intake. Bear in mind that they also have a very high exercise level, which requires such a diet.

    If you are NOT a competitive athlete then [I guess] those guidelines are not as important for said general individual, even if they DO do resistance training and play sport.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    Not necessarily; if you are active enough, then your Maintenance should allow for such daily carbohydrate intake (and FYI, I eat in excess of your 630g of carbohydrates daily and have no problems staying lean).

    These are the recommendations for post-training for an athlete to optimize and maximize their performance (Burke, 2006).

    Serious competitive athletes at the top level (and even national level for their countries) eat as such and you do not see them being "plump" or a "fat@ss". The leanest people (who are also coincidentally athletes) in the world have very high-calorie diets that include high carbohydrate intake. Bear in mind that they also have a very high exercise level, which requires such a diet.

    If you are NOT a competitive athlete then [I guess] those guidelines are not as important for said general individual, even if they DO do resistance training and play sport.


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    I'm just curious - what do your recommended macros look like for PRO/FAT then if we are talking 7-12g CHO per Kg?
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDarkHalf View Post
    I'm just curious - what do your recommended macros look like for PRO/FAT then if we are talking 7-12g CHO per Kg?
    That depends a lot on what type of athlete you are, whether you do resistance training or not, etc., and sometimes your goals.

    You also need to realize that everyone works best on different macronutrient ratios.


    Protein

    The following is the estimated protein requirements for athletes, taken from Tarnolopolsky (2006):

    Sedentary men and women: 0.8-1.0 g/kg/day
    Elite male endurance athletes: 1.6g/kg/day
    Moderate-intensity endurance athletes (exercising 4-5 times per week for 45-60 min): 1.2g/kg/day
    Moderate recreational endurance athletes (exercising 4-5 times per week f0r 30 min at <55% VO2peak): 0.8-1.0 g/kg/day
    Football, power sports: 1.4-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (early training) 1.5-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (steady state): 1.0-1.2 g/kg/day
    Female athletes: ~15% lower than male athletes


    Fat

    Fat intake is not as precisely regulated as both carbohydrate and protein (Prentice, 1998). There is however evidence to suggest that a high daily fat intake impairs high intensity exercise performance (Greenhaff, Gleeson & Maughan, 1987). Yet low dietary intakes of fat are not optimal for muscle growth, as they have been shown to decrease total testosterone (Berrino, et al, 2001).Therefore a good recommendation is to have 15-30% of your total daily caloric intake derived from fats (Lambert, Frank & Evans, 2004).


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    The problem with almost all empirical data, and this is the elephant in the closet, is that very, very little information pertains to BB'ing type training. The closest data is old Soviet data on PL'ing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    The problem with almost all empirical data, and this is the elephant in the closet, is that very, very little information pertains to BB'ing type training. The closest data is old Soviet data on PL'ing.
    Yes, the recommendations set out above are mostly for athletes, from endurance to strength to power to speed sports.

    The recommendations below were done with a wide range of subjects (including athletes, bodybuilders, and sedentary controls), using a variety of training methods (including resistance training for muscle growth), over numerous studies (including: Lemon, et al., 1992; Phillips, et al., 1997; Tarnopolsky, et al., 1988; Tarnopolsky, et al., 1992; Young, 1987):
    Football, power sports: 1.4-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (early training) 1.5-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (steady state): 1.0-1.2 g/kg/day

    When it comes to bodybuilding, the best article I have read to date re nutritional recommendations (covers many studies and data) is:

    Lambert, C. P., Frank, L. L. & Evans, W. J. (2004). Macronutrient considerations for the sport of bodybuilding. Journal of Sports Medicine, 34(5), 317-327.

    It is relevant and covers all areas of nutrition re fat loss, muscle gain, etc., specific to bodybuilding.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    These are the recommendations for post-training for an athlete to optimize and maximize their performance (Burke, 2006).

    Serious competitive athletes at the top level (and even national level for their countries) eat as such and you do not see them being "plump" or a "fat@ss". The leanest people (who are also coincidentally athletes) in the world have very high-calorie diets that include high carbohydrate intake. Bear in mind that they also have a very high exercise level, which requires such a diet.
    I guess it would depend on the sport of the athlete, high endurance runners and swimmers i could see this, other sports involving less aerobic energy expenditure this would be excess. You cant just say all serious competitive athletes, because there is definately some fluctuation based on specific sports.
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    looks like the point in my previous post was already brought up, so ignore it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    When it comes to bodybuilding, the best article I have read to date re nutritional recommendations (covers many studies and data) is:

    Lambert, C. P., Frank, L. L. & Evans, W. J. (2004). Macronutrient considerations for the sport of bodybuilding. Journal of Sports Medicine, 34(5), 317-327.
    I am going to look this up
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    That depends a lot on what type of athlete you are, whether you do resistance training or not, etc., and sometimes your goals.

    You also need to realize that everyone works best on different macronutrient ratios.


    Protein

    The following is the estimated protein requirements for athletes, taken from Tarnolopolsky (2006):

    Sedentary men and women: 0.8-1.0 g/kg/day
    Elite male endurance athletes: 1.6g/kg/day
    Moderate-intensity endurance athletes (exercising 4-5 times per week for 45-60 min): 1.2g/kg/day
    Moderate recreational endurance athletes (exercising 4-5 times per week f0r 30 min at <55% VO2peak): 0.8-1.0 g/kg/day
    Football, power sports: 1.4-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (early training) 1.5-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (steady state): 1.0-1.2 g/kg/day
    Female athletes: ~15% lower than male athletes


    Fat

    Fat intake is not as precisely regulated as both carbohydrate and protein (Prentice, 1998). There is however evidence to suggest that a high daily fat intake impairs high intensity exercise performance (Greenhaff, Gleeson & Maughan, 1987). Yet low dietary intakes of fat are not optimal for muscle growth, as they have been shown to decrease total testosterone (Berrino, et al, 2001).Therefore a good recommendation is to have 15-30% of your total daily caloric intake derived from fats (Lambert, Frank & Evans, 2004).


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    I understand what you are saying, but regardless of the type of athlete you have the type of metabolism. Mine is equivalent to a slug, even a little under what should be a "Maintenance" level, I will gain weight.

    God knows I would love to eat 1300 carbs/ day, and have been close. All the best foods are there. LOL.

    Decent guidelines, but everyone needs to learn what works for them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guejsn View Post
    That depends a lot on what type of athlete you are, whether you do resistance training or not, etc., and sometimes your goals.

    You also need to realize that everyone works best on different macronutrient ratios.


    Protein

    The following is the estimated protein requirements for athletes, taken from Tarnolopolsky (2006):

    Sedentary men and women: 0.8-1.0 g/kg/day
    Elite male endurance athletes: 1.6g/kg/day
    Moderate-intensity endurance athletes (exercising 4-5 times per week for 45-60 min): 1.2g/kg/day
    Moderate recreational endurance athletes (exercising 4-5 times per week f0r 30 min at <55% VO2peak): 0.8-1.0 g/kg/day
    Football, power sports: 1.4-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (early training) 1.5-1.7 g/kg/day
    Resistance athletes (steady state): 1.0-1.2 g/kg/day
    Female athletes: ~15% lower than male athletes


    Fat

    Fat intake is not as precisely regulated as both carbohydrate and protein (Prentice, 1998). There is however evidence to suggest that a high daily fat intake impairs high intensity exercise performance (Greenhaff, Gleeson & Maughan, 1987). Yet low dietary intakes of fat are not optimal for muscle growth, as they have been shown to decrease total testosterone (Berrino, et al, 2001).Therefore a good recommendation is to have 15-30% of your total daily caloric intake derived from fats (Lambert, Frank & Evans, 2004).


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    Based on your guidelines I should be consuming 6000 calories per day.
    My maintenance is 3800.
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    there is some horrible advise in this thread. To the OP i'll keep it simple. After you workout you want to consume carbs within 10 minutes post workout. What i would do is either bring a protein shake 50g with dextrose or maltodextrin 50g you can use Gatorade powder for maltodextrin or just buy it in bulk.

    what i do is after i leave the gym (i only live 5 min away if that), i use dymatize berry protein and berry punch mix the 2 in a blender and chug it. **** tastes great. you get the carbs you need that are sugary and you get your protein. The only problem i see is the high fructose corn syrup so I'm looking for an organic drink. I swith back and forth with dymatize orange creamsicle and orange juice post workout also. I remain around 8% bf doing this.

    700 carbs everyday is insane unless your Michael Phelps that's 2800 calories everyday just with carbs add in your fat intake and your protein and your consuming way too many calories and you will get fat from it unless your job is to train as a professional athlete and from the sounds of it it doesn't sound like your a pro. No offense.
  

  
 

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