Why you shouldn't eat breakfast

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  1. Quote Originally Posted by RoidRageX10 View Post
    I'm clueless too, but at least I know I am taking supplments from a company that has representaives that have a brain like Mullet to maximize supplementaion results.

    BTW, Mullet, Check out my Log! "RoidRageX10 is Reborn"
    Hint Hint..Prime and Anabolic Pump are being used..:bb3:
    I will be sure to stop in; if not to comment, to read for sure!


  2. Quote Originally Posted by Omen View Post


    You guys are taking this whole hypoglycemia/catabolism thing too goddamn seriously......

    F**K me.

    not wen you get light headed when you train, thats not too serious right? specially during big lifts.

    as far as catabolism, will it happen to a crazy extent? probably not, but increasing AMPk i believe inhibits mTOR and protein synthesis. which is not something that we want to do.

    however im no expert, and mullet solders posts need to be dumbed down for me a lot of the time.
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  3. ^Yeah they have to me dumbed down for me too, and I thought I was smart hahah.

  4. I didnt read the whole article I skimmed though it... with that being said just want to add that a friend of mine does this "warrior diet" where you basically fast all day and just eat 1 big meal at night, personally I think he is crazy but hey to each his own
    PESCIENCE.COM

    "The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance." - Socrates

  5. Quote Originally Posted by JudoJosh View Post
    I didnt read the whole article I skimmed though it... with that being said just want to add that a friend of mine does this "warrior diet" where you basically fast all day and just eat 1 big meal at night, personally I think he is crazy but hey to each his own
    that only works if you eat the flesh of small children
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by Mulletsoldier View Post
    Do you know how the glycolytic/gluconeogenic pathway operates in reference to resistance training? That is an honest question, by the way; no disrespect intended.

    I ask because 'hypoglycaemia' is a bit of a misplaced term here. Also, the GIndex is a bit outdated, CF! I dislike using tools like that, as they are terribly inaccurate, but: The Insulin Index is a better indicator of what we really want to know from the GI. At any rate, who is prescribing utilizing High II foods after a fast?

    I think what is being misunderstood here is the role of FA oxidation in response to training. I think most of you would be plenty surprised at how little the body truly needs glucose to function. For [most likely] the first 185, 000 years of our existence we fed off of animal fat and protein. There is a reason why our bodies have such a high FA Oxidative capacity!

    We were initially meant to consume protein and fat; have you not ever wondered why we are so predisposed to glucose-related diseases? What do you feel the incidence rate if for Impaired Fatty Acid synthesis is? Hint: Nada!
    answer to your first question is im no pro on it. (meaning please explain its been a long while)

    your right GI index is outdated but not many people go by the insulin index.

    and isnt having something like waxy maize going to cause a ridiculously high insulin response? in which case the body may over secrete insulin in response to the amount of carbs taken in (more so then if you were eating all day and then have the shake rather then having those as your carbs after you have fasted.)

    i know glucose really isnt needed i have read tons of stuff on it i actually have a really great article on it if you are interested. (posted it it in a thread about post workout carbs)

    also i know that about 80 percent of the glucose we get when we train is being made via gluconeogenisis the other 20 percent comes from what we eat (no bull radio with one of the doctors cant renember the name)

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Mulletsoldier View Post
    I think what is being misunderstood here is the role of FA oxidation in response to training. I think most of you would be plenty surprised at how little the body truly needs glucose to function. For [most likely] the first 185, 000 years of our existence we fed off of animal fat and protein. There is a reason why our bodies have such a high FA Oxidative capacity!

    We were initially meant to consume protein and fat; have you not ever wondered why we are so predisposed to glucose-related diseases? What do you feel the incidence rate if for Impaired Fatty Acid synthesis is? Hint: Nada!
    Further evidence that my switch to the paleo diet was a GOOD move.

  8. Paleo is a good way to go
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
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  9. Quote Originally Posted by jakellpet View Post
    that only works if you eat the flesh of small children
    I heard Chuck Norris does that, but with rocks.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Mulletsoldier View Post
    Oh no. As Jake said, I have designed a fasted training program utilizing energy-modulating [cAMP, AMPk, PPAR agonists] and anti-lipogenic/lipolytic supplements meant to catalyze a psuedo-ketogenic state, so to speak. Training fasted merely forces the body to use FFAs, and not glucose, as its oxidative substrate. Luckily for us, 2/3 of contractile energy transactions use FFAs as their currency.

    IMO, fasted resistance training is the quickest, easiest, and most beneficial program for recomposition purposes. There is a reason why Ketogenic diets are the most efficacious for fat loss! In my particular program, the benefits of a CKD and full-carbohydrate diet are both realized in their best aspects [though, obviously, not fully!].

    Their are three types of muscle fibers. Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. Fasted morning exercises need to be based upon the type of muscle fibers which are best suited to accomplish your goals.

    FASTED STRENGTH or POWER TRAINING IS USELESS!!!!!!!!

    Type 2B are the largest, fastest, and most powerful muscle fiber type. They are also easily fatigued and primarily use the Glycolytic and Creatine Phosphate energy channels. The oxidative capacity of this muscle is VERY VERY LOW. Lifting for strength or power is usually done in the 1-8 rep range at 85-100% or your 1RM. The type of muscle fibers being used for this type of training are Type 2B.

    Type 2A are your intermediate muscle fibers. They can utilize all three energy pathways (creatine, glycolytic, and oxidative). These fibers are mostly utilized in the 8+ rep range at <85% 1RM.

    Type 1 muscle fibers are smaller and weaker than the other types. This is your slow twitch muscle. This muscle's primary energy system is Oxidative, and has a low glycolytic capacity. These muscle fibers are usually distributed most densely in the muscles of the legs (especially lower legs), and postural/core areas. They are utilized during longer duration aerobic exercise (cardio), and approximately 20+ rep range at <40-50% 1RM .


    If anyone has read actually read this, i hope you learn a couple things.

    #1 FASTED STRENGTH AND POWER TRAINING IS NOT AN EFFICIENT WAY TO BUILD STRENGTH, POWER, OR BURN FAT!!!!!!

    #2 FASTED CARDIO IS AN EFFICIENT WAY TO BURN BODY FAT. BUT YOU DONT HAVE TO BE 8+ HOURS FASTED TO BURN FAT WITH AEROBICS!!!!!!!

    #3 CERTAIN SUPPLEMENTS MAY ASSIST IN RAISING METABOLISM, AND MAY EVEN HELP TO PREVENT MUSCLE WASTING DURING FASTED EXERCISE. BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT YOU CAN EXPECT YOUR SLOW TWITCH MUSCLES TO INCREASE YOUR MAX BENCH PRESS, OR YOUR FAST TWITCH Type 2B MUSCLE TO GET YOUR THROUGH A MARATHON RUN. (EPO and AAS dont count as supplements)

    :bb3:

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Brother View Post
    However Im not trying to be a body builder Im trying to build a better body. Big difference. Alot of people on these boards are all about "filling" their bodies...obviously thats not always whats best for your body.
    I have actually considered taking this approach. I figure I will add some pounds to my frame then maybe go that route. I am not even going to try to get involved in this debate and it is way over my head.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by crazyfool405 View Post
    also i know that about 80 percent of the glucose we get when we train is being made via gluconeogenisis the other 20 percent comes from what we eat (no bull radio with one of the doctors cant renember the name)
    It really depends on your diet. IF all you eat's carb glucose will all be from glucose, but if all you eat's protein all the glucose you have will be through gluconeogenesis.

  13. Quote Originally Posted by ozarkaBRAND View Post
    Further evidence that my switch to the paleo diet was a GOOD move.
    Huzzah! Another Paleo eater here. Changed over completely just a few weeks ago (morning oats were a weak spot for me). Definitely a enormous difference in performance and well-being. Give it a shot fellaz.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by PowerlifterMB View Post
    It really depends on your diet. IF all you eat's carb glucose will all be from glucose, but if all you eat's protein all the glucose you have will be through gluconeogenesis.

    that wasnt what was said in the interview.

    doesnt matter the diet, 80% will come from gluconeogenisis or the amino acid pool, and the other 20 will come from ingested carbs.

  15. Quote Originally Posted by smoke dog View Post
    Their are three types of muscle fibers. Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. Fasted morning exercises need to be based upon the type of muscle fibers which are best suited to accomplish your goals.

    FASTED STRENGTH or POWER TRAINING IS USELESS!!!!!!!!

    Type 2B are the largest, fastest, and most powerful muscle fiber type. They are also easily fatigued and primarily use the Glycolytic and Creatine Phosphate energy channels. The oxidative capacity of this muscle is VERY VERY LOW. Lifting for strength or power is usually done in the 1-8 rep range at 85-100% or your 1RM. The type of muscle fibers being used for this type of training are Type 2B.

    Type 2A are your intermediate muscle fibers. They can utilize all three energy pathways (creatine, glycolytic, and oxidative). These fibers are mostly utilized in the 8+ rep range at <85% 1RM.

    Type 1 muscle fibers are smaller and weaker than the other types. This is your slow twitch muscle. This muscle's primary energy system is Oxidative, and has a low glycolytic capacity. These muscle fibers are usually distributed most densely in the muscles of the legs (especially lower legs), and postural/core areas. They are utilized during longer duration aerobic exercise (cardio), and approximately 20+ rep range at <40-50% 1RM .


    If anyone has read actually read this, i hope you learn a couple things.

    #1 FASTED STRENGTH AND POWER TRAINING IS NOT AN EFFICIENT WAY TO BUILD STRENGTH, POWER, OR BURN FAT!!!!!!

    #2 FASTED CARDIO IS AN EFFICIENT WAY TO BURN BODY FAT. BUT YOU DONT HAVE TO BE 8+ HOURS FASTED TO BURN FAT WITH AEROBICS!!!!!!!

    #3 CERTAIN SUPPLEMENTS MAY ASSIST IN RAISING METABOLISM, AND MAY EVEN HELP TO PREVENT MUSCLE WASTING DURING FASTED EXERCISE. BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT YOU CAN EXPECT YOUR SLOW TWITCH MUSCLES TO INCREASE YOUR MAX BENCH PRESS, OR YOUR FAST TWITCH Type 2B MUSCLE TO GET YOUR THROUGH A MARATHON RUN. (EPO and AAS dont count as supplements)

    :bb3:
    That was some great information, thanks for that.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by crazyfool405 View Post
    that wasnt what was said in the interview.

    doesnt matter the diet, 80% will come from gluconeogenisis or the amino acid pool, and the other 20 will come from ingested carbs.
    Do you have the article, I'd love to see it. Sounds false to be. Reason being that protein is the only one of the macro nutrients to have nitrogen atoms all the others are made from carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen Protein has a vital job in the body skin, hair, nails, muscle repair ect. Your diet should be made up of mostly carbs (glucose) so you will have enough glucose through a carbohydrate loaded diet. Gluconeogenesis only occurs when your bdoy has an insufficient amount of glucose to meet energy needs. Protein as well as fat can be converted to glucose(pretty sure). So if you have enough glucose from your diet gluconeogenesis will not occur.

  17. Quote Originally Posted by PowerlifterMB View Post
    Do you have the article, I'd love to see it. Sounds false to be. Reason being that protein is the only one of the macro nutrients to have nitrogen atoms all the others are made from carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen Protein has a vital job in the body skin, hair, nails, muscle repair ect. Your diet should be made up of mostly carbs (glucose) so you will have enough glucose through a carbohydrate loaded diet. Gluconeogenesis only occurs when your bdoy has an insufficient amount of glucose to meet energy needs. Protein as well as fat can be converted to glucose(pretty sure). So if you have enough glucose from your diet gluconeogenesis will not occur.
    glucose isnt really necessary nutrient your body can deal without it and much more effectivly IMO

    but its on no bull radio on the MD forum ill have to dig it up its an interview not a written article.

  18. Quote Originally Posted by crazyfool405 View Post
    not wen you get light headed when you train, thats not too serious right? specially during big lifts.

    as far as catabolism, will it happen to a crazy extent? probably not, but increasing AMPk i believe inhibits mTOR and protein synthesis. which is not something that we want to do.

    however im no expert, and mullet solders posts need to be dumbed down for me a lot of the time.
    AMPk also regulates PPARa/y and their target genes; inhibits ACC [transcriptional and post-translational] and increases MCD phosphorylation, and thereby increases CPT-1; inhibits PEPCK; and significantly increases whole body Insulin sensitivity! IMO, these things overcome the downstream inhibition of mTOR!

  19. Quote Originally Posted by smoke dog View Post
    Their are three types of muscle fibers. Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. Fasted morning exercises need to be based upon the type of muscle fibers which are best suited to accomplish your goals.

    FASTED STRENGTH or POWER TRAINING IS USELESS!!!!!!!!

    Type 2B are the largest, fastest, and most powerful muscle fiber type. They are also easily fatigued and primarily use the Glycolytic and Creatine Phosphate energy channels. The oxidative capacity of this muscle is VERY VERY LOW. Lifting for strength or power is usually done in the 1-8 rep range at 85-100% or your 1RM. The type of muscle fibers being used for this type of training are Type 2B.

    Type 2A are your intermediate muscle fibers. They can utilize all three energy pathways (creatine, glycolytic, and oxidative). These fibers are mostly utilized in the 8+ rep range at <85% 1RM.

    Type 1 muscle fibers are smaller and weaker than the other types. This is your slow twitch muscle. This muscle's primary energy system is Oxidative, and has a low glycolytic capacity. These muscle fibers are usually distributed most densely in the muscles of the legs (especially lower legs), and postural/core areas. They are utilized during longer duration aerobic exercise (cardio), and approximately 20+ rep range at <40-50% 1RM .


    If anyone has read actually read this, i hope you learn a couple things.

    #1 FASTED STRENGTH AND POWER TRAINING IS NOT AN EFFICIENT WAY TO BUILD STRENGTH, POWER, OR BURN FAT!!!!!!

    #2 FASTED CARDIO IS AN EFFICIENT WAY TO BURN BODY FAT. BUT YOU DONT HAVE TO BE 8+ HOURS FASTED TO BURN FAT WITH AEROBICS!!!!!!!

    #3 CERTAIN SUPPLEMENTS MAY ASSIST IN RAISING METABOLISM, AND MAY EVEN HELP TO PREVENT MUSCLE WASTING DURING FASTED EXERCISE. BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT YOU CAN EXPECT YOUR SLOW TWITCH MUSCLES TO INCREASE YOUR MAX BENCH PRESS, OR YOUR FAST TWITCH Type 2B MUSCLE TO GET YOUR THROUGH A MARATHON RUN. (EPO and AAS dont count as supplements)

    :bb3:
    Unfortunately, we are not predominantly or even [for the most of us] marginally comprised by Type IIx. I am also assuming you are referring to Type IIx as Type IIb now refers to other mammalian skeletal muscle phenotypes [not human].

    Now, with that being said, Type IIx fiber oxidative capacity is INTERMEDIATE, not low, as you stated; leading us to believe that a combination approach to exercise is most efficacious. If we simply ate to feed our Type IIx we would have no endurance; i.e., those of us who lift for >5 minutes to build mass should not take your advice.

    Also, could you quantify why utilizing the body's oxidative capacity is inefficient for building mass? You have a point in terms of power training [i.e., 1-3 rep training, long rests, and very acute bouts of training] but have absolutely no point in regards to a more aesthetically-tuned training regime which incorporates more than Type IIx fibers. Bodybuilding, to increase sarcoplasmic fluid capacity, does not predominantly use Type IIx fiber type. As a result of consistent bouts of resistance training [multiple weeks in a row], Type IIa fiber activation takes precedent over Type IIx! The role of Type IIx as the power fiber had been misunderstood for some time: In very acute [see: completely untrained individuals forced to complete an arduous task] Type IIx is the power fiber; however, in trained individuals [see: the vast majority of us on this site] Type IIa fibers come to dominate:

    In fact, Sharon et al (1991), Adams et al (1993) and other studies display a proportionate decrease in Type IIx fibers with long bouts of resistance training [12 weeks and over]. Training of the type most people here utilize does not demand Type IIb fiber activation as you suggest! In Sharon et al's study, the decrease in Type IIx fibers was from 16% to 0.9%. As a result, I am not sure your point was well made!

    As well, the glycolytic pathway is not immediate; unless your diet is horrid you will have glycogen stored from the previous day[s].

  20. Quote Originally Posted by smoke dog View Post
    Their are three types of muscle fibers. Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. Fasted morning exercises need to be based upon the type of muscle fibers which are best suited to accomplish your goals.

    FASTED STRENGTH or POWER TRAINING IS USELESS!!!!!!!!

    Type 2B are the largest, fastest, and most powerful muscle fiber type. They are also easily fatigued and primarily use the Glycolytic and Creatine Phosphate energy channels. The oxidative capacity of this muscle is VERY VERY LOW. Lifting for strength or power is usually done in the 1-8 rep range at 85-100% or your 1RM. The type of muscle fibers being used for this type of training are Type 2B.

    Type 2A are your intermediate muscle fibers. They can utilize all three energy pathways (creatine, glycolytic, and oxidative). These fibers are mostly utilized in the 8+ rep range at <85% 1RM.

    Type 1 muscle fibers are smaller and weaker than the other types. This is your slow twitch muscle. This muscle's primary energy system is Oxidative, and has a low glycolytic capacity. These muscle fibers are usually distributed most densely in the muscles of the legs (especially lower legs), and postural/core areas. They are utilized during longer duration aerobic exercise (cardio), and approximately 20+ rep range at <40-50% 1RM .
    Also, Sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy [increase in sarcoplasmic fluid without associated increase in myofibril increase] is most efficiently achieved via Type IIa fibers as a function of the interplay between explosive contraction and endurance! This correlates directly to the studies I mentioned previously. Bodybuilders should be most interested in Type IIa fibers which DO have a high oxidative capacity.

    I.e., You make a scathing criticism for fasted training assuming several things:

    a) Fiber phenotype activation is the only factor in regulating myofibrillar hypertrophy. In fact, neural adaptation and acetylcholine activation are just as important. Two things not affected by carbohydrate metabolism.

    b) That the interplay between fiber type activation and an increase in [FA] oxidative capacity has no accumulative relationship for muscle growth. To increase relative performance we must achieve both hypertrophy and increased oxidative capacity.

    c) That Type IIx fiber types are the only fiber types which result in an increase in protein activation factors.

    d) That Type IIx fiber types are the most important for resistance training - they are not!

    If anybody read your post they would have most definitely picked up some practical information! However, and without being rude, it does not pertain to this particular due to its inadequate scope of analysis. Anabolism [particularly of the type most of those reading this are interested in - i.e., increasing mass] is a far more diverse subject than fiber type!

  21. Quote Originally Posted by Mulletsoldier View Post
    AMPk also regulates PPARa/y and their target genes; inhibits ACC [transcriptional and post-translational] and increases MCD phosphorylation, and thereby increases CPT-1; inhibits PEPCK; and significantly increases whole body Insulin sensitivity! IMO, these things overcome the downstream inhibition of mTOR!

    what did you/ are you sudying that you know so much, i want to learn this.

  22. Quote Originally Posted by crazyfool405 View Post
    what did you/ are you sudying that you know so much, i want to learn this.
    I have a double B.A., in Philosophy and Sociology!

  23. Quote Originally Posted by Mulletsoldier View Post
    I have a double B.A., in Philosophy and Sociology!
    and you picked all this up along the way????



    where can i learn much of what your saying?

  24. Quote Originally Posted by crazyfool405 View Post
    and you picked all this up along the way????

    Yes, exactly. Mostly through casual reading and so forth. A customer would ask a question/make a comment and I would research do answer that question [firstly out of hobby, then after out of vocation].

    where can i learn much of what your saying?
    Hmm, I have no idea really. That is a bit like asking, "Where did you learn to workout?" I mean, you could say "I started here", or "this person first showed me...." but you couldn't really summate what you know in a single place!
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