Lifts to size correalation

Page 2 of 4 First 1234 Last
  1. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Form and technique is always the first thing taught to novices by successful coaches. According to Mark Rippetoe and Bill Starr, you are a novice until you cannot make linear progression on compound movements anymore.

    My point is, you start extremely LIGHT on a linear based program, then after your technique is accomplished you add 5-10lbs per workout. That is the same principles Rippetoe suggests to every novice lifter on earth. That is what I am saying. You said "forget the progressive overload" and starting talking about TUT.

    Isometric, eccentric, concentric <<< three different phases of a lift. Your 15 second pause or whatever solely focused on isometrics.
    I know.

    I said forget progressive overload so he can drop the ego and learn how to execute his movements optimally for his goals. Obviously you thought I meant "forget progressive overload FOREVER"....which is not what I meant.

    With all this knowledge you must be way bigger than Thehardone the 19 year old Phenom!!! hahah lol just bustin' your balls!

    Cheers
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.

  2. Registered User
    kingk0ng's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    743
    Rep Power
    122328

    Quote Originally Posted by TheHardOne View Post
    I said forget progressive overload so he can drop the ego and learn how to execute his movements optimally for his goals. Obviously you thought I meant "forget progressive overload FOREVER"....which is not what I meant.
    O

    OK yeah I agree with that.

    With all this knowledge you must be way bigger than Thehardone the 19 year old Phenom!!! hahah lol just bustin' your balls!
    You seem to be pretty big for 19 in your avatar pic. I don't look quite as big as you. I try to stay kind of smaller so I can get around a lot easier in the mountains, boxing, grappling, or running and stuff. I'm probably a shade or two smaller than you are.

    Cheers
    Good talking. Goodnight!
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  3. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    O

    OK yeah I agree with that.



    You seem to be pretty big for 19 in your avatar pic. I don't look quite as big as you. I try to stay kind of smaller so I can get around a lot easier in the mountains, boxing, grappling, or running and stuff. I'm probably a shade or two smaller than you are.



    Good talking. Goodnight!
    2 similar minds have disagreements but in a mature manner end up settling it like real men

    If every disagreement was settled like this in the world, their would be peace and love! lol

    Respect to ya!
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.
    •   
       

  4. Registered User
    supraseed48's Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  220 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    431
    Rep Power
    11617

    If we could teach politicians to debate in a forum in this manner where they have to read reply/rebuttle maybe we could fix the economy and cure multiple social problems instead of getting nowhere. Pride prevents progress and my way is never the only way. thumbsup: guys!!
    "Liver stress is weakness leaving the body!!"
  5. Registered User
    kingk0ng's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    743
    Rep Power
    122328

    Quote Originally Posted by supraseed48 View Post
    If we could teach politicians to debate in a forum in this manner where they have to read reply/rebuttle maybe we could fix the economy and cure multiple social problems instead of getting nowhere. Pride prevents progress and my way is never the only way. thumbsup: guys!!
    Thanks fella. Civil disagreements usually makes someone provide their knowledge and backup what they know. I like these types of threads and reading through them. In regards to the politicians, you are so right about that!

    2 similar minds have disagreements but in a mature manner end up settling it like real men

    If every disagreement was settled like this in the world, their would be peace and love! lol

    Respect to ya!
    Respect back to you my friend. If only all threads had the maturity this thread had.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  6. Registered User
    1ISOGCebuano's Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    32

    Everyone needs a change up in their routine. From the looks of things if your chest is not growing then you need to change things up.

    Try this one, before you do your bench press set, stress out those pecks, do either an incline dumbbell fly (heavy enough that you maintain proper form), my favorite is a cable fly (two way resistance on the cables burns my pecs big time). Then jump on to your press routine, could be a barbell bench press or dumbbell flat bench press.

    Because your pecs are already burning from your fly routine, you will concentrate more blood to the region when your doing your chest press routine.

    Continue your chest routine alternating between push and pull. Focus on working the top, middle and lower section of your pec.

    More importantly stop comparing yourself to others, work on your own form, and have fun.

    Changes will come if you put in the time and effort, just remember "stop counting your REPS, but rather, make every REP count"
  7. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by 1ISOGCebuano View Post
    Everyone needs a change up in their routine. From the looks of things if your chest is not growing then you need to change things up.

    Try this one, before you do your bench press set, stress out those pecks, do either an incline dumbbell fly (heavy enough that you maintain proper form), my favorite is a cable fly (two way resistance on the cables burns my pecs big time). Then jump on to your press routine, could be a barbell bench press or dumbbell flat bench press.

    Because your pecs are already burning from your fly routine, you will concentrate more blood to the region when your doing your chest press routine.

    Continue your chest routine alternating between push and pull. Focus on working the top, middle and lower section of your pec.

    More importantly stop comparing yourself to others, work on your own form, and have fun.

    Changes will come if you put in the time and effort, just remember "stop counting your REPS, but rather, make every REP count"
    Hey bro do ya thinkz that chest workouut will work for meh?























    lol
  8. Registered User
    kingk0ng's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    743
    Rep Power
    122328

    Quote Originally Posted by TheHardOne View Post
    Hey bro do ya thinkz that chest workouut will work for meh?
    lol.... I hope that guy is joking..
















    lol[/QUOTE]
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  9. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    lol.... I hope that guy is joking..
















    lol
    [/QUOTE]

    Me or the other guy? lol I was just trollin' him haha
  10. Registered User
    kingk0ng's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    743
    Rep Power
    122328

    Me or the other guy? lol I was just trollin' him haha
    The other guy. His advice didn't make sense.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  11. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    The other guy. His advice didn't make sense.
    haha just another parasite in this world blindly following a typical flex magazine routine haha
  12. Registered User
    kBrown's Avatar
    Stats
    5'5"  200 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    703
    Rep Power
    16433

    Buddy, all the above aside you need to look at the weight you are pushing. 100lbs...you shouldn't expect much size. Plain and simple.
    Not being mean at all just calling it like I see it. You can have a fairly crappy diet and still develop a descent body (albeit not shredded) and a pretty massive chest if you push good weights and exercise consistently. But, you have to work with fairly heavy weight.
    I don't care if you weigh 145-180lbs you should be benching 225 at least

    My tips: increase 5-10lbs a week for the foreseeable future... Eat healthy, lift progressively heavier, and you will see some growth. Keep a journal to make sure you do not stagnate and log all your lifting. Also, don't over train.
  13. Registered User
    kingk0ng's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    743
    Rep Power
    122328

    Quote Originally Posted by kBrown View Post
    Buddy, all the above aside you need to look at the weight you are pushing. 100lbs...you shouldn't expect much size. Plain and simple.
    Not being mean at all just calling it like I see it. You can have a fairly crappy diet and still develop a descent body (albeit not shredded) and a pretty massive chest if you push good weights and exercise consistently. But, you have to work with fairly heavy weight.
    I don't care if you weigh 145-180lbs you should be benching 225 at least

    My tips: increase 5-10lbs a week for the foreseeable future... Eat healthy, lift progressively heavier, and you will see some growth. Keep a journal to make sure you do not stagnate and log all your lifting. Also, don't over train.
    The guidelines to whereas someone "should be" lifting are as follows.

    Squat: Weight x's 2
    Deadlift: Weight x's 2.5
    Bench Press: Weight x's 1.5
    Strict Press: Weight x's 1
    Power Clean: Weight x's 1.5
    Rep Squats: Rep your body weight 15 times
    Front Squat: Weight x's 1
    Snatch: Weight x's 1
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  14. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    The guidelines to whereas someone "should be" lifting are as follows.

    Squat: Weight x's 2
    Deadlift: Weight x's 2.5
    Bench Press: Weight x's 1.5
    Strict Press: Weight x's 1
    Power Clean: Weight x's 1.5
    Rep Squats: Rep your body weight 15 times
    Front Squat: Weight x's 1
    Snatch: Weight x's 1
    I dont even know what to consider strong anymore, because nowa days it seems like every little 170 pound twig can deadlift 2-3x their bodyweight for reps, 2-3x their bodyweight on squats, and 2x their bodyweight on bench press....lol I won't lie it does get me pissed off(jealous) when I see some twig deadlifting 600 for reps....but then again most of those guys didn't have to work 110 percent to get there, just having those so called "genetics" does wonders. Or extremely short limbs! Okay, okay, im a jealous hater! (even though 600lbs squats/deads were in my arsenal during my senior year in high school) hehe
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.
  15. Registered User
    jbryand101b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Your moms house
    Posts
    14,536
    Rep Power
    1590223

    Quote Originally Posted by djmikeyspikes View Post
    Why the hell are there guys in the gym benchin like 20lbs more then me but are so much bigger....


    Im eatin a ****load sleeping a lot and training hard and im gaining weight... Just not seein a chest difference
    because size and strength are two different types of training. yes, you are always training the 4 main areas (strength, power, hypertrophy, endurance)
    but depending on the rest, intensity & duration of the training, this will move the focus from one of those 4 onto more than the others.

    example, I train just in the hypertrophy area, and in doing so, one can not be concerned with strength gains, because I am purely concerned with creating a hypertrophic responce, and nothing else. will I get bigger if I lift at 85-95% of my 1rm on all lifts for 3-6 reps, with 2-5 min of rest, 4-5 yes, but it wont be as efficiant as training 70-80% for 8-12 reps, with 45sec-1min of rest, with slow and controled, full, complete range of motion, on every rep.

    there are guys a lot smaller than i who lift a lot more than I. you can go into any gym and see it.

    when you see pictures of body builders lifting weights in magazines, those are just for looks, they openly admit the dont lift "heavy" for what their size is.
  16. Registered User
    jbryand101b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Your moms house
    Posts
    14,536
    Rep Power
    1590223

    Quote Originally Posted by djmikeyspikes View Post
    I bench 100 3set 10 reps

    Then i do a little less on incline 3set 10reps

    And like 80lbs on decline 3set 10rep

    And i mix all that with hammer chest press and puhups on chest day

    Alone with arms
    why dont you try adding in more sets, 3 sets per exercise is the very minimum, and I only use that for beginner clients.

    4 sets, 15,12,10,8, 45sec-1min30sec rest, trying to increase the weight by a2.5-5lbs on each set.

    intensity (weight) goes up, duration (reps) goes down.

    make sure you are hitting full range of motion with the exercises.

    this means for bench, bar goes up just before locking the elbows (do not lock them out), bar comes down (with control) all the way to the chest (lightly touching, not slamming down to bounce off), at nipple level, and repeat.

    dumbells, top of lift, hold the dumbells so they make an A shape, then lower the dumbells, keeping the A shape down to the chest, at nipple level, and lift.

    do not let the arms flare out, this causes your shoulders to take over, if you can not stop this from happening, you are lifting too much weight.
  17. Registered User
    jbryand101b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Your moms house
    Posts
    14,536
    Rep Power
    1590223

    Quote Originally Posted by supraseed48 View Post
    with spotters under each elbow.
    you should never spot at the elbows, mixed grip if spotting with a barbell, and at the wrist for dumbells.

    very unsafe to spot at the elbows.
  18. Registered User
    jbryand101b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Your moms house
    Posts
    14,536
    Rep Power
    1590223

    Quote Originally Posted by supraseed48 View Post
    If he is lifting to impress someone with the little # on the side of the db he can forget getting any bigger. Id rather see a guy pressing the bucks with proper form and control for 10 than a guy flailing the 150's for 6 withWeight is for show and form is for grow. .
    but this here is good advice, and correct.
  19. Registered User
    jbryand101b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Your moms house
    Posts
    14,536
    Rep Power
    1590223

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Agree.



    Chest growth will depend on his calories. Getting a big bench press and expanding his calories will lead to both growth and strength.

    Person A- eats tons of calories and uses progressive overload; growth is inevitable.
    Person B- eats a little bit and uses progressive overload; growth is not likely to occur, but the CNS will teach the muscle that the person alread has to generate force more efficiently - more motor unit activation, delayed stretch from the Golgi Tendon organ, etc. lightweight powerlifter style training.

    You suggest that hypertrophy and strength specific without hypertrophy is separated by tempo while this is inaccurate. Hypertrophy and strength specific without hypertrophy is separated by the amount of calories the person consumes necessary to aid in the growth of the hypertrophy.



    Bad advice. Progressive overload is not a "theory" but is a form of forcing muscular growth through never letting the muscle adapt to a specific stimulus in pounds, volume, tempo or selection. Progressive overload and lots of calories is how hypertrophy is structured.

    Success from progressive overload with famous routines are often in many forms, example: linear progressive resistance, linear periodization, etc. One way or another you gotta make the next workout better than the last or you gave your body no reason to grow.



    Don't see where you're going with this either. You can do your TUT 15-50 second eccentric/concentric phase with the bar all day long but it ain't gonna mean nothing. You need weight on the bar in order for it to count. There's a reason programs with the principles of progressive overload are so successful. You think hypertrophy is all in the technique and TUT but you are wrong. Hypertrophy is all about progressive overload and good nutrition.

    Not to mention there are two forms of hypertrophy, myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic and both are generally stimulated differently than the other.



    Also sounds to me like you're going to train your Type IIA fibers more than your Type I or Type IIB with your presented method. Slow reps with no weight is just going to cause a lactic acid "pump".
    specific adaptations to imposed demands.

    progressive over load, yes, you are correct, but specificity is also key, if ones goals are to get stronger, there is a specific way to train in order to maximize their performance/results.

    you pointed out the myo (muscle) hypertrophy, but I think you failed to understand the specificity of the type of training.

    you will get bigger if you lift heavy in the 3-5 rep range for the higher percentage of your 1rm, with proper rest, but as the data shows, it is not the most effeciant way to gain size.
  20. Registered User
    VS91588's Avatar
    Stats
    5'8"  230 lbs.
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    702
    Rep Power
    46439

    1. Try resting shorter and increase the volume of sets. This would increase much more oxygen/nutrient rich blood flow into the targeted muscle which would make the muscle more fuller.

    2. Google Time Under Tension
  21. Registered User
    jbryand101b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Your moms house
    Posts
    14,536
    Rep Power
    1590223

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    The guidelines to whereas someone "should be" lifting are as follows.

    Squat: Weight x's 2
    Deadlift: Weight x's 2.5
    Bench Press: Weight x's 1.5
    Strict Press: Weight x's 1
    Power Clean: Weight x's 1.5
    Rep Squats: Rep your body weight 15 times
    Front Squat: Weight x's 1
    Snatch: Weight x's 1
    so, is this a 1rm, or what? 10rm?

    and who set these standards?
  22. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by jbryand101b View Post
    so, is this a 1rm, or what? 10rm?

    and who set these standards?
    I feel those standards are just about right for someone who has been training 1-2 years.

    Obviously "strength" standards shouldn't matter to anyone, one's progress should never be compared to anyone but his/her progress from the past.
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.
  23. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by jbryand101b View Post
    specific adaptations to imposed demands.

    progressive over load, yes, you are correct, but specificity is also key, if ones goals are to get stronger, there is a specific way to train in order to maximize their performance/results.

    you pointed out the myo (muscle) hypertrophy, but I think you failed to understand the specificity of the type of training.

    you will get bigger if you lift heavy in the 3-5 rep range for the higher percentage of your 1rm, with proper rest, but as the data shows, it is not the most effeciant way to gain size
    .
    Finally someone that understands how to maximize hypertrophy!
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.
  24. Registered User
    fueledpassion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3,421
    Rep Power
    645610

    Quote Originally Posted by supraseed48 View Post
    If he's doing it with proper form and control, I couldn't say enough about him. HE'S A BEAST for starters.

    The guys he are suggesting sound to be much larger but not much stronger. So either the op is strong for his size or these "guys" aren't as strong for theirs. Pound for pound he's got them. It might be that the op has a denser and harder physique than the boys swoll up on creatine,water weight and no telling that appear to be bigger but not a whole lot stronger. I see this alot in the gym. There is also a point in there where it starts taking a lot more muscle mass to break lifting ceilings. I've seen guys weigh in the 180 range put up 365 and guys weigh 220 do good to put up 8 plates. Which guy is really stronger? The guy pressing 405, or the guy pressing twice his body weight? I've always been more impressed with the latter. To me the guy weighing 220 would need to be pressing 445 to be as strong.
    Diminishing returns - it's taught in micro-economics but also applies to weight-to-strength ratio as well. But there could be another situation that the OP might not be considering (not that he hasn't but it's possible that he didnt consider this):

    The guy next to him might not be training at 95% of his 1RM. He might do it like I do ~ 75% max, HIT style, to failure. PLUS, there are many guys in the gym that lift the same or more weight than I do but look considerably smaller as well. This goes back to form. My form is impeccable and my reps are slow. The way I press 225 on the bench would make a powerlifting judge wet his pants. But for a noob, this could be misleading to only see me press out 7-8 of those especially if I've been doing 3 sets of this with high-intensity and small breaks between sets. It would seem in that case that I'm pretty weak. Regardless if I wanted to impress the noobs around me I'd just slap 315 on there and press it normally, without impeccable form. Bottom line is that impeccable form leads to greater results and are always significantly harder to lift. If most guys did it like this their working sets would probably drop by 10-15% in weight.

    I digress. I'm actually more on the OP's side though. I'm 5'5", 165lbs Bench ~ 300+, Squat ~ 375+, Dead ~ 375+, one of the best things you can do for strength is getting lean.
  25. Registered User
    kingk0ng's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Age
    29
    Posts
    743
    Rep Power
    122328

    Quote Originally Posted by jbryand101b View Post
    so, is this a 1rm, or what? 10rm?

    and who set these standards?
    They're not set in stone, but general rule of thumb standards. They are for 1RM, other than the 15 rep squats that you supposedly should do for your own weight.

    I disagree with your statement 3-5 reps is not the optimal way to maximize hypertrophy; it very well could be. I think the weight on the bar accounts for how much hypertrophy will be gained.

    How much hypertrophy would you gain while eating in a caloric deficit and performing 10-15 reps with just the bar?
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  26. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    They're not set in stone, but general rule of thumb standards. They are for 1RM, other than the 15 rep squats that you supposedly should do for your own weight.

    I disagree with your statement 3-5 reps is not the optimal way to maximize hypertrophy; it very well could be. I think the weight on the bar accounts for how much hypertrophy will be gained.

    How much hypertrophy would you gain while eating in a caloric deficit and performing 10-15 reps with just the bar?
    Whenever you here a "bodybuilder" rant about 10-15 reps per set, they mean a weight that you can handle that allows you to reach 10-15 reps via reaching failure, of course weights are important, progressive overload is a must, nobody said we are performaing 10-15 reps with just the bar, I suppose we "bodybuilders" just need to speak more specific.
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.
  27. Registered User
    fueledpassion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3,421
    Rep Power
    645610

    Quote Originally Posted by TheHardOne View Post
    Whenever you here a "bodybuilder" rant about 10-15 reps per set, they mean a weight that you can handle that allows you to reach 10-15 reps via reaching failure, of course weights are important, progressive overload is a must, nobody said we are performaing 10-15 reps with just the bar, I suppose we "bodybuilders" just need to speak more specific.
    Well said. But as an additional comment it should go without mentioning that everyone is taking sets to failure regardless of strength or mass training. How could the muscle grow if it never approaches it's current limit? Unfortunately, not everyone has read Arnold's books lol. I like how I hear guys on here start piping in about "overtraining" when you go to failure too often. While I understand overtraining does occur when you have too much volume for too long of a period in your routine, it is something that doesn't come easy and I'd comfortably say that most guys in the gym have never truly experienced "overtraining" to begin with. I know I haven't! I've been unmotivated and tired, but not overtrained.

    Anyways, not to open up another topic in this thread but I just wanted to confirm that I agree with your statement above 100%. If you aren't training to failure and you aren't progressively adding weight each week then you aren't a bodybuilder.
  28. Registered User
    fueledpassion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3,421
    Rep Power
    645610

    Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    They're not set in stone, but general rule of thumb standards. They are for 1RM, other than the 15 rep squats that you supposedly should do for your own weight.

    I disagree with your statement 3-5 reps is not the optimal way to maximize hypertrophy; it very well could be. I think the weight on the bar accounts for how much hypertrophy will be gained.

    How much hypertrophy would you gain while eating in a caloric deficit and performing 10-15 reps with just the bar?
    Arnold explains the hypertrophic rep range well. In his book, he says that your initial fibers recruited by the brain are being used to move the weight and as they become more fatigued, the brain will start recruiting more and more muscle fibers. And according to what part of the body you are training, a certain rep range "to failure" applies to maximize hypertrophy. For upper body ~ 8-12, for lower body ~ 10-15. There is another way to figure it out as well - 75% of your 1RM, taken to failure. In addition, Arnold also recommends going heavier than that on certain exercises, especially the power exercises such as bench and squats from time to time. These ideal rep ranges are generally what it takes to fatique all of the muscle fibers in that group
  29. Registered User
    TheHardOne's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  235 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,535
    Rep Power
    74443

    Quote Originally Posted by fueledpassion View Post
    Well said. But as an additional comment it should go without mentioning that everyone is taking sets to failure regardless of strength or mass training. How could the muscle grow if it never approaches it's current limit? Unfortunately, not everyone has read Arnold's books lol. I like how I hear guys on here start piping in about "overtraining" when you go to failure too often. While I understand overtraining does occur when you have too much volume for too long of a period in your routine, it is something that doesn't come easy and I'd comfortably say that most guys in the gym have never truly experienced "overtraining" to begin with. I know I haven't! I've been unmotivated and tired, but not overtrained.

    Anyways, not to open up another topic in this thread but I just wanted to confirm that I agree with your statement above 100%. If you aren't training to failure and you aren't progressively adding weight each week then you aren't a bodybuilder.
    If this was facebook I would of liked that post a million times lol

    You nailed it, I hate it when people are so concerned with overtraining when they don't even know what it is, in the past doing high volume for me while taking alot of sets to failure would literally run me into the ground cause me to get sick/lose appetite/inability to fall asleep/moody, but after countless battles in the gym, I feel my Central Nervous System is now able to handle the higher volume with intensity(failure). If your a newbie I feel if you want to take your physique to its highest level you must let go of your fears and just train like a maniac....I mean when was the last time you have seen a "bodybuilder" actually train "hard"? Only names I can think of are Branch Warren/Johnnie Jackson, Jason Huh, Kai Greene(before he hooked up with george farah), and Evan Centopani. Everyone else in the IFBB train like girls with excuses. lol okay, im sure their are more that train with intensity but you get my point. I live by intensity, and I despise anyone that doesn't live by intensity.
    *LG Sciences Board Rep*
    Changing Lives is what I crave.
  30. Registered User
    fueledpassion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3,421
    Rep Power
    645610

    Dorian Yates is all about intensity, too. I'm following one of his routines right now actually and I haven't been this sore in a long, long time...
  •   

      
     

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Best size building lifts....?
    By shortbutbig in forum Natural Bodybuilding
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-24-2012, 03:12 AM
  2. Lifts I do that I seldom, if ever, see others do
    By Rodja in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 02-17-2009, 06:30 PM
  3. Going wide on certain lifts
    By KingMeso in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-27-2008, 08:44 AM
  4. BB Lifts....
    By Buff Bagwell in forum Exercise Science
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-01-2006, 01:01 PM
  5. Any other lifts
    By blahblah192 in forum Powerlifting/Strongman
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-11-2006, 02:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.