HGH or IGF for bone loss

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    HGH or IGF for bone loss


    So I had a bone density test done today, and got an unofficial answer from the nurse saying that it does appear that I suffer from bone mass loss. Treatments can include HRT, which I am on, but I am wondering if I should mention adding in HGH or IGF into it to help with bone mass. I've skimmed over very few studies on the net, but wanted to get some other opinions on this, as I am too damn young to have bone loss like she stated.
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    I actually read an article on Pubmed talking about IGF helping with bone density. I'll look it up and see if I can find it bro.
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    IGF-1 is a growth-promoting polypeptide that is essential for normal growth and development. In serum, the majority of the IGFs exist in a 150-kDa complex including the IGF molecule, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and the acid labile subunit (ALS). This complex prolongs the half-life of serum IGFs and facilitates their endocrine actions. Liver IGF-1–deficient (LID) mice and ALS knockout (ALSKO) mice exhibited relatively normal growth and development, despite having 75% and 65% reductions in serum IGF-1 levels, respectively. Double gene disrupted mice were generated by crossing LID+ALSKO mice. These mice exhibited further reductions in serum IGF-1 levels and a significant reduction in linear growth. The proximal growth plates of the tibiae of LID+ALSKO mice were smaller in total height as well as in the height of the proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes. There was also a 10% decrease in bone mineral density and a greater than 35% decrease in periosteal circumference and cortical thickness in these mice. IGF-1 treatment for 4 weeks restored the total height of the proximal growth plate of the tibia. Thus, the double gene disruption LID+ALSKO mouse model demonstrates that a threshold concentration of circulating IGF-1 is necessary for normal bone growth and suggests that IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and ALS play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis.

    Here's the full article: http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/article...z&artid=151128
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    Quote Originally Posted by idunk42
    IGF-1 is a growth-promoting polypeptide that is essential for normal growth and development. In serum, the majority of the IGFs exist in a 150-kDa complex including the IGF molecule, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and the acid labile subunit (ALS). This complex prolongs the half-life of serum IGFs and facilitates their endocrine actions. Liver IGF-1–deficient (LID) mice and ALS knockout (ALSKO) mice exhibited relatively normal growth and development, despite having 75% and 65% reductions in serum IGF-1 levels, respectively. Double gene disrupted mice were generated by crossing LID+ALSKO mice. These mice exhibited further reductions in serum IGF-1 levels and a significant reduction in linear growth. The proximal growth plates of the tibiae of LID+ALSKO mice were smaller in total height as well as in the height of the proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes. There was also a 10% decrease in bone mineral density and a greater than 35% decrease in periosteal circumference and cortical thickness in these mice. IGF-1 treatment for 4 weeks restored the total height of the proximal growth plate of the tibia. Thus, the double gene disruption LID+ALSKO mouse model demonstrates that a threshold concentration of circulating IGF-1 is necessary for normal bone growth and suggests that IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and ALS play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis.

    Here's the full article: http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/article...z&artid=151128
    Yeah I read that same article and was just about to post it haha. But I'll rep ya for doing your research. Good post.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeMountD
    Yeah I read that same article and was just about to post it haha. But I'll rep ya for doing your research. Good post.
    Thanks bro! Yeah, I've been researching this stuff once you posted your initial study with MGF. I dont always understand it all, but Im working on it.
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    Here's another one:

    Muscle damage has been shown to enhance the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) to regenerating skeletal muscle. One responsible cell type involved in this process is a hematopoietic stem cell derivative, the myelomonocytic precursor (MMC). However, the molecular components responsible for this injury-related response remain largely unknown. In this paper, we show that delivery of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to adult skeletal muscle by three different methods--plasmid electroporation, injection of genetically engineered myoblasts, and recombinant protein injection--increases the integration of BMDCs up to fourfold. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we developed an in vitro fusion assay in which co-cultures of MMCs and myotubes were exposed to IGF-I. The number of fusion events was substantially augmented by IGF-I, independent of its effect on cell survival. These results provide novel evidence that a single factor, IGF-I, is sufficient to enhance the fusion of bone marrow derivatives with adult skeletal muscle. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

    I dont have the full article, but Im having it sent to me. Hopefully I'll get it later today or tomorrow.
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    Here is one - but done on women.

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) modulates the imbalance in bone remodeling, thereby decreasing bone loss. Sex hormones are known to influence rheumatic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HRT on the serum levels of hormones and cytokines regulating bone turnover in 88 postmenopausal women with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) randomly allocated to receive HRT plus calcium and vitamin D3 or calcium and vitamin D3 alone for 2 years. An increase in estradiol (E2) correlated strongly with improvement of bone mineral density in the hip (P < 0.001) and lumbar spine (P < 0.001). Both baseline levels and changes during the study of IL-6 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were correlated positively (P < 0.001). HRT for 2 years resulted in an increase of the bone anabolic factor, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (P < 0.05) and a decrease of serum levels of soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) (P < 0.05), which is known to enhance the biological activity of IL-6, an osteoclast-stimulating and proinflammatory cytokine. Baseline levels of IL-6 and IGF-1 were inversely associated (P < 0.05), and elevation of IGF-1 was connected with decrease in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P < 0.05) after 2 years. Interestingly, increase in serum levels of E2 was associated with reduction of sIL-6R (P < 0.05) and reduction of sIL-6R was correlated with improved bone mineral density in the lumbar spine (P < 0.05). The latter association was however not significant after adjusting for the effect of E2 (P = 0.075). The influences of IGF-1 and the IL-6/sIL-6R pathways suggest possible mechanisms whereby HRT may exert beneficial effects in RA. However, to confirm this hypothesis future and larger studies are needed.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/article...t&artid=165058
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    Here is another - more on the HRT front.

    Young adult males who cannot produce or respond to estrogen (E) are osteopenic, suggesting that E may regulate bone turnover in men, as well as in women. Both bioavailable E and testosterone (T) decrease substantially in aging men, but it is unclear which deficiency is the more important factor contributing to the increased bone resorption and impaired bone formation that leads to their bone loss. Thus, we addressed this issue directly by eliminating endogenous T and E production in 59 elderly men (mean age 68 years), studying them first under conditions of physiologic T and E replacement and then assessing the impact on bone turnover of withdrawing both T and E, withdrawing only T, or only E, or continuing both. Bone resorption markers increased significantly in the absence of both hormones and were unchanged in men receiving both hormones. By two-factor ANOVA, E played the major role in preventing the increase in the bone resorption markers, whereas T had no significant effect. By contrast, serum osteocalcin, a bone formation marker, decreased in the absence of both hormones, and both E and T maintained osteocalcin levels. We conclude that in aging men, E is the dominant sex steroid regulating bone resorption, whereas both E and T are important in maintaining bone formation.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/article...t&artid=381474
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    The role of interluekin-6 appears to be significant - perhaps supplementation with it may help?
    (I'm really tired and not able to interpret right now....)

    Interleukin-6 is an essential mediator of the bone loss caused by loss of estrogens. Because loss of androgens also causes bone loss, we have examined whether the IL-6 gene is regulated by androgens, and whether IL-6 plays a role in the bone loss caused by androgen deficiency. Both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone inhibited IL-6 production by murine bone marrow-derived stromal cells. In addition, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and adrenal androgens inhibited the expression of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter plasmid driven by the human IL-6 promoter in HeLa cells cotransfected with an androgen receptor expression plasmid; however, these steroids were ineffective when the cells were cotransfected with an estrogen receptor expression plasmid. In accordance with the in vitro findings, orchidectomy in mice caused an increase in the replication of osteoclast progenitors in the bone marrow which could be prevented by androgen replacement or administration of an IL-6 neutralizing antibody. Moreover, bone histomorphometric analysis of trabecular bone revealed that, in contrast to IL-6 sufficient mice which exhibited increased osteoclast numbers and bone loss following orchidectomy, IL-6 deficient mice (generated by targeted gene disruption) did not. This evidence demonstrates that male sex steroids, acting through the androgen-specific receptor, inhibit the expression of the IL-6 gene; and that IL-6 mediates the upregulation of osteoclastogenesis and therefore the bone loss caused by androgen deficiency, as it does in estrogen deficiency.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/article...z&artid=295976
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