My pissing tool, WTF, help

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    Unhappy My pissing tool, WTF, help


    Ok, I'm a very healthy guy, no health probs. Never get sick, NEVER. Don't smoke, drink a lil' on the weekends only, very healthy diet. For about 2 yrs. now after draining the lizard I have to tap like a trillion times! WTF is goin on? I'm a young stud! It's getting old and any info that could help would be great. And like my buddy the Chiro says, if you tap more than 3 x your playing with it. He's a smartass.

    Any advise? Is there some herbs I could try?

    Thanks,
    Leaking pecker.

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    Is a pissing tool all it is? Just tap it till you're done. Or, get your buddy, the chiro, to tap it for you and see how he does it.

    Surely, you've got other things in life to worry about. This is fukkin' !!!!!!!!!!!
  3. jim623
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    Slight dehydration maybe? Try upping the water intake.
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    Quote Originally Posted by roids1 View Post
    Is a pissing tool all it is? Just tap it till you're done. Or, get your buddy, the chiro, to tap it for you and see how he does it.

    Surely, you've got other things in life to worry about. This is fukkin' !!!!!!!!!!!
    I'll pass on my buddy tappin' it, you jackass! For real, this **** is a prob. I should'nt be tapping forever like this. Oh, glad this post amused you. Ha!

    I drink alot of water already! I drink more than a gal. a day.
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    Maybe go to your doctors?

    dribbling of urine after urinating is one of the symptoms of prostate cancer.
    “We are what we repeatedly do. Therefore, excellence is not an act, but a habit.”
  6. jim623
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chub View Post
    Maybe go to your doctors?

    dribbling of urine after urinating is one of the symptoms of prostate cancer.
    Good point chubs. My initial thought was urinery track infection but not for 2 years. You'd be toxic by now.
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    Go to the doctors and get a STI check up while your at it..but 2 years is quite along time..
    “We are what we repeatedly do. Therefore, excellence is not an act, but a habit.”
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    Well with you scaring me with cancer I think I'll go. DAMN! If they have to jam something down my **** I'll cry.
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    LOL, I want to try some cranberry juice first and see if that helps at all. Do I sound lika woman or what? Cranberry juice. SHEEEEET! ROFL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chub View Post
    Maybe go to your doctors?

    dribbling of urine after urinating is one of the symptoms of prostate cancer.
    Indeed; however, it is also caused by the urethra being stretched out in diameter for various reasons, including but not limited to: holding massive amounts of urine in while asleep and getting the Pee-On that is a messy f*cker to contend with; prostate issues such as enlargement and/or weakened; or simply do to the fact that sand has escaped your vagina and entered the failed-penile skin that hangs between your legs. Food for thought.

    Seriously, go get checked out. There's no shame in it, we all have to at some point. Dr. Lubenfinger treats us all.


    Quote Originally Posted by REEVESDIESEL View Post
    Do I sound lika woman or what?
    Simply put: Yes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Lungz View Post
    Indeed; however, it is also caused by the urethra being stretched out in diameter for various reasons, including but not limited to: holding massive amounts of urine in while asleep and getting the Pee-On that is a messy f*cker to contend with; prostate issues such as enlargement and/or weakened; or simply do to the fact that sand has escaped your vagina and entered the failed-penile skin that hangs between your legs. Food for thought.

    Seriously, go get checked out. There's no shame in it, we all have to at some point. Dr. Lubenfinger treats us all.



    Simply put: Yes.
    Yep, your right. Tks. BTW, nice post there. Ha.
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    Quote Originally Posted by REEVESDIESEL View Post
    I'll pass on my buddy tappin' it, you jackass! For real, this **** is a prob. I should'nt be tapping forever like this. Oh, glad this post amused you. Ha!

    I drink alot of water already! I drink more than a gal. a day.

    The way you prefaced it, I thought this might have been somewhat of a joke post. I see you're worried about it. I'd just go see a Urologist.
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    Quote Originally Posted by REEVESDIESEL View Post
    Well with you scaring me with cancer I think I'll go. DAMN! If they have to jam something down my **** I'll cry.
    Hate to make you dread it even more but that is NOT how they get at the prostate . You know that one door was supposed to be an exit only ? Not so much . It is a really good idea though , men ages 18-35 are the target demographic of prostate issues . G'luck
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonofsteven View Post
    Hate to make you dread it even more but that is NOT how they get at the prostate . You know that one door was supposed to be an exit only ? Not so much . It is a really good idea though , men ages 18-35 are the target demographic of prostate issues . G'luck
    Yep, knew that. Just worried some rod is gonna be shoved down the pipe.
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    Way too much misinformation in one thread.

    Prostate problems: benign prostatic hypertrophy

    What is benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH)?

    Benign means not malignant, that is, non-cancerous; prostatic refers to a man's prostate gland (a small walnut-sized gland near the opening of the bladder which makes some of the fluid in semen); hypertrophy means an abnormal increase in the number of cells in one part of the body, causing an overgrowth of that part of the body. So BPH, as it is sometimes known, is a non-cancerous overgrowth of cells in the prostate.

    Because the prostate surrounds the urethra (the tube that goes out of the bladder into your penis), if it gets too big and squeezes the urethra, you can have problems passing water. A man's prostate usually becomes larger in middle to old age. Prostates get a little bigger in all men over 45 to 50 years of age. They get big enough to interfere with passing urine in about 25 per cent of men over 55 and 50 per cent of men over 75.

    How did I get BPH?

    No one knows why it happens: it may be related to hormonal changes with increasing age. Some drugs such as alcohol, those used to treat depression or Parkinson’s disease, diuretics (fluid tablets), some heart drugs, antihistamines, and some cough and cold remedies can make the problem worse.

    How is BPH diagnosed?

    The doctor will ask you about your symptoms and what medications, if any, you are taking. You will then have a digital rectal examination (DRE) where the doctor inserts a gloved finger into your back passage. Because the prostate is near the back passage, if it has got bigger, the doctor will feel a bulge. You may be sent to a specialist (urologist) for further tests including measuring your urine flow, X-ray or ultrasound or some laboratory tests. A blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA) may also be done, and your urine will be checked for infection.
    What will I feel?

    It is rare for men under 50 to 55 years to have any problems even if they have slightly larger prostates. The first sign of trouble is usually a difficulty in passing urine: it may be hard to start, and the stream may not be very strong. You may have trouble emptying your bladder completely and therefore have to go more often, which can disturb your sleep. You may feel a strong urge to urinate but not have much to pass, or dribble a bit after you have finished, wetting your pants. Very occasionally, there can be blood in the urine. You may get a bladder infection because the flow is not good, or your urine may be suddenly blocked completely.
    What makes BPH better?

    * Avoiding or cutting down on alcohol.
    * Not drinking anything for 3 hours before bedtime.
    * Always going to the toilet immediately when you feel the urge, even at night.
    * Ensuring your bladder empties completely; don’t rush.

    How can my doctor help me?

    Your doctor may decide to simply ‘watch and wait’. This decision is based on your age, severity of symptoms and your general health.
    Medications

    Drugs may be prescribed to:

    * improve urine flow (for example, prazosin, tamsulosin, terazosin);
    * reduce the size of the prostate (for example finasteride); or
    * treat any infections.

    If symptoms are very troublesome and not improving, you may need to have surgery.
    Complementary therapies

    Several complementary medicines have been used to relieve the symptoms. Most have not been well studied. They include:

    * fruit of the saw palmetto (Serenoa repens, Sabal serrulata). Preliminary evidence suggests this is effective, and may be as effective as the drug finasteride;
    * root of the South African star grass (Hypoxis rooperi);
    * bark of the African plum tree (Pygeum africanum);
    * root of the stinging nettle (Urtica dioica);
    * pollen from rye (Secale cereale);
    * pumpkin seeds (Cucurbita pepo); and
    * beta-sitosterol plant extracts.

    Surgical approaches

    There are several types of surgery performed.

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP): is the most commonly undertaken type of prostate surgery. TURP involves removing the prostate in small pieces. The surgeon passes a small tube with a camera on the end into the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder down to the opening of the penis). Via this tube, the surgeon can cut away part of the prostate using a metal loop carrying an electric current. Removing part of the prostate gland stops it from pressing on the urethra. TURP is sometimes done under a general anaesthetic and sometimes a spinal anaesthetic.

    After having TURP, some men will suffer from retrograde ejaculation. This is when semen flows backward into the bladder during ejaculation. Erectile dysfunction is also an unfortunate result of TURP surgery in some cases.

    Transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP): this also relieves the pressure on the urethra. This may be used in cases where the enlargement is not as pronounced.

    Balloon dilation: this is done by inserting a balloon-tipped catheter into the penis through the urethra and into the bladder. The balloon is then inflated to stretch the urethra to allow urine to flow more freely.

    Minimally invasive surgical treatments: these usually use some form of heat, such as laser therapy, microwave therapy, or trans-urethral needle ablation (TUNA), to reduce the size of the prostate and so relieve pressure on the urethra. They may carry a smaller risk of side effects than a TURP and may require milder forms of anaesthesia. These treatments are not suitable for all men with prostate problems.

    Open prostatectomy: if the prostate is very large, most of it may have to be removed by open surgery, where the abdomen is opened up. There is a risk of erectile dysfunction and a small chance of urinary incontinence after open surgery.
    What happens if BPH is not treated?

    In most people the symptoms stay the same or fluctuate, while in some, they get worse. You can get infected urine which will make you unwell and give you a fever. In a small percentage of people the blockage gets really bad, and they are unable to pass much urine at all and the kidneys can get damaged, making the person generally weak and sick. You may get a total blockage, and a tube will have to be put in to drain your urine.
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