Strenght, Speed, Fat.

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  1. Bro, truthfuly, I played football for three years in highschool and wrestled for the same three as well. I played Dlineman and Olineman(sometimes). For both sports I went to states and for football we won it 2 yrs in a row. Some of people from my team (Miami Southridge Spartans) went directly to the NFL(Troy and Darren Davis) and alot of them got sports scholarships to colleges. (I got expelled from that high school within 4 weeks of graduating and had any priviliges yanked but thats another story.) But we were rarely spoken to about losing weight. Are coaches main concern was were we better then the next guy out there. Of course we ate right and ate alot but Im pretty sure we all knew what was good and bad to be putting into our bodies.

    I would definitly put most of your effort into increasing stamina and speed at your current weight because from what most of my friends told me after leaving was that the first thing they were told was to get heavier and stronger. Fast is no good if the second the guy touches you you fall over. you get my point.

    Check out this website Bigger, Faster, Stronger .
    This is what we used all throughout highschool and this is what is also used by many colleges for conditioning athletes. The **** has some pretty intense stuff to it. Minor **** from ankle strengthening exercises to finger strengthening exercises to major **** for speed, agility and stamina movements.

    And as for Keto, Like IA said, it effects individuals differently. For someone that is going to be on the field everyday training in direct sun(which I hope your doing or else youll be screwed at camp) I wouldnt recommend it. The **** had me bogged down most of the day while on it and youll need all the energy you can get after an hour of running under the sun.

    Good luck bro,

    db


  2. This is a pretty good article for you to read as well. db

    Applicable Strength Training for Preparing a Collegiate Athlete for the NFL Combine and Pro Day
    Jeff Higuera CSCS, C-PT, HFI

    Preparing a collegiate athlete for the most important test in their life has many components of study and preparation. Although we may work with these athletes on form, mechanics, and tips that may give them advantages for greater success; a certain level of physicality or strength must be maintained or improved to help maximize their chances of success at the Combine or Pro Day.

    An athlete may begin preparing as early as 10 weeks to only 2 weeks before his Pro Day or the Combine depending on many variables such as All-Star Games, Christmas, etc. In any amount of time that we have to prepare these athletes, we have a great responsibility to teach tactical approaches to the shuttle runs, vertical leap and 40 yard sprint. The physical strength that these athletes have attained should continue to be increased to further enhance their chance of greater performance.

    The goals of strength training before the Combine or Pro Day should be as follows:

    1. To address injuries and rehabilitation concerns following the competitive season 2. To strengthen areas susceptible to injury that may occur during training, Pro Day, or the Combine 3. To increase 225 rep max, increase power and speed strength 4. To help attain desired weight and body composition

    Addressing injuries and rehabilitation concerns following the competitive season

    Many athletes do not finish the season without bumps and bruises that come along with football. All athletes need to be questioned about their past injuries and be examined by a doctor to insure that no injuries will present a problem in preparing themselves for the test. Injuries must be the first factor addressed by immediately applying physical therapy to their training schedule until the rehab specialist releases them to participate 100% in the preparation program. Furthermore, past or present injuries must be monitored and progressively strengthened throughout the whole program. Lack of monitoring and progression may lead to decreased performance due to re-injury, muscle imbalance, or overcompensation.

    “Combine” participants will be examined in an intense medical examination that will expose any injuries that the athlete has had. These results are released to all NFL teams. Injured athletes stock will drop drastically from this process alone. I have seen probable 3rd to 5th round picks go un-drafted because of an injury revealed in the medical examination.

    Strengthen areas susceptible to injury that may occur during training, Pro Day, or the Combine

    Teams want to see athletes perform, and athletes that are injured cannot perform to their greatest abilities. Pre-hab training is essential to a Combine or Pro Day preparation program, especially for athletes who have a longer shot of getting drafted in the later rounds. These athletes need to put on a stellar performance to enhance their likelihood of getting drafted or signed as a free agent. No athlete, not even probable top picks, want to be labeled as “injury prone.” An athlete with this label may as well kiss their chances good-bye in getting drafted in any round or even getting picked up as a free agent.

    Injury prevention training should first begin with training for muscular balance. This can be accomplished through a variety of methods, with my favorite method being push/pull. Push/Pull stresses both agonist and antagonist muscles from both eccentric and concentric directions. (1) An example of this method of training would be to stress the pectorals by performing dumbbell bench press, followed by as one arm row to stress the rhomboids. Push/Pull in the same plane of movement will have the best effect on counter training agonist and antagonist muscle groups.

    It is our job as strength and conditioning coaches to progress our athletes carefully decreasing thechance of injury by teaching proper mechanics, warm-up, and strengthening areas susceptible to injury such as:<

    1. Quadriceps and Hamstrings: During training and sprinting at maximal effort, performing explosive actions with all out intensity, weak hamstrings and quadriceps may be exposed and often injured. Muscle imbalance may also be an issue in these muscles, (more often than not, the quadriceps having greater strength then the hamstrings) should be examined before training begins, and continuously strengthened throughout preparation training.

    The hamstring muscle group (semimembranosis, semitendonosis, and biceps femoris) are critical musculature involved in locomotion and must be strengthened accordingly. The hamstrings are active in all three phases of sprinting. They are responsible for decelerating, eccentrically contracting, the forward leg movement in the swing phase (swing phase: where hip extension occurs, force being applied back towards the ground), stabilizing the knee and extending the hip during the support phase (support phase: at touchdown, when the braking takes place) and assisting the gastroc in extending the knee during the take-off phase (the lift of center of mass to highest trajectory). (4) It is necessary to train the hamstrings eccentrically due to the critical role of eccentric contractions of these high speed limb movements where generally this injury occurs (4). In some various studies the hamstrings, a 3:1 ratio of the quads to hams strength were found to correlate highly with an increased incidence of hamstring strains (4). Hamstring should be increase to 80% of the quad strength. A combination of concentric, isometric, and especially eccentric contraction training should be utilized in the training program (3). Excellent methods of training the hamstring complex are standing hamstring curls (free motion) focusing on decreasing lateral rotation of the hip, the “Triple Threat Combo” by Juan Carlos Santana (6), along with compound movements, squats, single leg squats, deadlifts, and power movements.

    2. Hips (Adductors, Abductors, Hip Flexors): The hip complex is another area exposed to injury during explosive movements and change of direction. Hip flexors, especially rectus femoris, are often injured during high intensity training and sprinting. Rectus femoris can be trained fully by working in the sagital plane training the muscle in both hip flexion and knee extension. The hip adductors (adductor magnus, adductor longus, adductor brevis, pectenius, gracilis) and hip abductors (tensor facia latte, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius) should also be trained concentrically, eccentrically, and isometrically to decrease chance of groin injuries, decrease lateral rotation of the hip (poor running mechanics), and help increase stabilization of the pelvis while in locomotion. As in hamstring injuries, hip flexors and adductors are generally injured during attempting to slow down the moving object. The eccentric contraction is not strong enough to counteract the concentric contraction or the momentum of the moving limb. Excellent methods of training the hip complex are standing hip flexion with and without knee flexion (free motion equipment), forward, lateral, 45 degree, backward 45 degree, and crossover reaching lunges with medicine balls or dumbbells. These exercise incorporate deceleration and the eccentric contraction important in developing the functional strength of changing direction and ceasing movement.

    3. Core Running, jumping, explosive take-offs, all movements start with the core. A weak midsection means weak transfer of energy, which translates into a lot of dispersed energy on the lumbar spine. Progressive intensity in plyometrics and speed training, along with strengthening rectus abdominus, transverse abdominus, internal and external obliques, and all the muscles of the low back (erector spinae muscles) will decrease the chances of low back pain, often a detrimental factor in performance. A variety of methods should be incorporated while training the core. Medicine balls, Stability Balls, Resistance Bands, and body weight stability core exercises should be used in developing functional strength in the core, producing efficiency of force transfer resulting in efficiency of movement.

    Increase 225 rep max, increase power and speed strength

    The 225 rep max tests absolute muscular endurance. This test uses an absolute load to evaluate muscular endurance under the assumption that muscular endurance is relative to muscular strength (5). When lifting with absolute loads defined as the equivalence between 1RM strength the reps completed with an absolute load are usually high. This would indicate that theoretically athletes with greater strength would perform more reps and have greater absolute muscular endurance. However, in one study shown (5), the correlation between the two decreased with athletes that could not perform more than 10 reps. Fortunately for measurement standards the overall averages for 225 rep max in the combine is approximately 19 plus, indicating higher equivalence levels between absolute muscular endurance and strength.

    The 225 workouts are based upon initial evaluation. We begin by testing the athlete on the 225 and determining their repetition max. If a player scores over 10 repetitions they will perform the “Over 10” workout shown below. The “Over 10” workout develops strength and muscular endurance with a load beginning over 225 lbs (250lbs). The workout is done two times per week and the number of reps are recorded for each bench press attempt. The workout is done all the way up to the week before the combine or pro day, where a submaximal weight will be used in a 3 set of 10 recovery workout. The following is the over 10 repetition workout.<

    250 pounds max number of times

    25 push-ups

    3:00 rest

    250 pounds max number of times

    25 push-ups

    3:00 rest

    225 max number of times

    25 push-ups

    2:00 rest

    225 max number of times

    25 push-ups

    155 max number of times

    25 push ups

    2:00 rest

    135 max number of times

    25 push-ups

    If a player performs less than ten reps, he begins with a load of 225 instead of 250. The same principles of progression and rest apply to the “Under 10” workout as they do to the “Over 10” workout. The player can begin to perform the over 225 workout based upon these results. The player must perform over 10 repetitions for 2 sets after their initial under 225 training. Below is the program for a player that performs under 10 reps:

    225 pounds max number of times

    25 push-ups

    3:00 rest

    225 pounds max number of times

    25 push-ups

    3:00 rest

    165 pounds max number of times

    25 push-ups

    2:00 rest

    165 pounds max number of times

    25 push-ups

    2:00 rest

    135 max number of times

    25 push-ups

    Increasing Power and Speed

    Strength is a component of power. We know that increasing our athletes strength will ultimately improve performance by increasing their explosive power and strength. Improving the muscles ability to produce power responsible for providing force against the ground during sprinting and change of direction will increase speed, acceleration, and ultimately performance. The periodized programs at the end of this article will help develop explosive power by increasing strength, kinetic linking, and overall muscular power. It is important to note that strength in the hip and core complex are the focal point of training in this program. Focusing from the bottom of the chest to the top of the knee will be the point of emphasis, along with exercises stressing powerful triple extension (hip extension, knee extension, and plantar flexion) in developing strength to produce great power. Exercises that will be used in this program are as follows:

    Barbell Power Cleans

    Barbell Hang Cleans

    Single Arm/Single Leg Dumbbell Snatches

    Dumbbell Power and Hang Cleans

    Squats and Single Leg Squats

    Lateral Squats

    Dead-lifts

    Lunges Multiple Directions

    Hip Flexors plus extension (Free Motion Equipment)

    Hip Extensors plus flexion (Free Motion Equipment)

    Upper Abdominals and Obliques (using medicine ball, Free Motion, and bands)

    Seated and Hanging Knee Raises for Lower Abdominals

    Lower Back Extensions and Stabilization Exercises (Stability Ball)

    To Help Attain Desired Body Weight and Body Composition

    When discussing an athletes’ desired body weight and composition here are a few situations that the athletes may be faced with when preparing for these events.

    Athlete needs to gain weight to play desired position in the NFL Athlete needs to gain weight to play different position in NFL Athlete needs to lose weight to play desired position in the NFL Athlete needs to lose weight to play different position in the NFL<

    Usually if the athlete is going to be playing a different position in the NFL, the NFL scouts and coaches believe that their body type, size, speed, skill level, or a combination of one or the other would be best presented at a different position. Scouts and NFL personnel will usually inform players or their agents that they are looking at them for a different position from which they played in college. Athletes must market themselves by performing well at a particular weight. <

    Strength training will play a major role in desired weight and body composition. There are a few ways to help your athletes either gain or lose weight. The goal of the athlete will determine how the strength and conditioning professional will manipulate these considerations into a program. An example would be a 6’4 268 pound defensive tackle (in college), who scouts think should play defensive line in the NFL. Because of this, the athlete will need to move to 280 pounds and still maintain his speed and athleticism. These are truly the demands that may be placed upon us. It is our job to get that athlete as close to his goal as possible in a safe manner. For this athlete, hopefully given a longer time frame, intense hypertrophy training along with an increase in caloric consumption would be the manipulation. Once again remembering that movement and speed training still must be a part of the program to maintain athleticism.

    Here is a list of the following ways to manipulate training programs to attain desired body weights and compositions.

    Manipulate sets and reps To gain muscle mass (4-5 sets of 6-8 reps) To maintain muscle while losing body fat (2-3 sets of 12-15) Increasing or decreasing caloric expenditure/consumption Strict nutritional guidelines Weigh-ins and body composition measurements every week

    Sample Periodization Workouts for 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 weeks

    10 Week Sample Program

    Weeks


    Duration (x per week)


    Power and Explosive


    Core Exercises


    Assistance Exercises

    2 Weeks


    4 x per week


    4 sets of 3 reps


    4 sets of 6-8 reps


    3 sets of 12 reps

    3 Weeks


    4 x per week


    5 sets of 1-3 reps


    4 sets of 4-6 reps


    3 sets of 10 reps

    3 Weeks


    4 x per week


    5 sets of 1-3 reps


    5 sets of 3-4 reps


    3 sets of 8 reps

    1 Week


    4 x per week


    5 sets of 1-3 reps


    5 sets of 3-4 reps


    3 sets of 8 reps

    1 Week


    2 x per week


    none


    3 sets of 10


    3 sets of 12 reps

    Abdominals 150-200 reps per day





    8 Week Sample Program

    Weeks


    Duration (x per week)


    Power and Explosive


    Core Exercises


    Assistance Exercises

    2 Weeks


    4 x per week


    4 sets of 3 reps


    4 sets of 6-8 reps


    3 sets of 12 reps

    4 Weeks


    4 x per week


    5 sets of 1-3 reps


    5 sets of 4-6 reps


    3 sets of 8 reps

    1 Weeks


    4 x per week


    5 sets of 1-3 reps


    5 sets of 3-4 reps


    3 sets of 8 reps

    1 Week


    2 x per week


    none


    3 sets of 10


    3 sets of 12 reps

    Abdominals 150-200 reps per day



    6 Week Sample Program

    Weeks


    Duration (x per week)


    Power and Explosive


    Core Exercises


    Assistance Exercises

    2 Weeks


    4 x per week


    4 sets of 3 reps


    4 sets of 6-8 reps


    3 sets of 12 reps

    3 Weeks

    1 Week

    Abdominals 150-200 reps per day


    4 x per week

    2 x per week


    5 sets of 1-3 reps

    none


    5 sets of 3-4reps

    3 sets of 10 reps


    3 sets of 8 reps

    3 sets of 12 reps






    4 Week Sample Program

    Weeks


    Duration (x per week)


    Power and Explosive


    Core Exercises


    Assistance Exercises

    3 Weeks


    4 x per week


    4 sets of 1-3 reps


    4 sets of 6-8 reps


    3 sets of 10 reps

    1 Week

    Abdominals 150-200 reps per day


    2 x per week


    none


    3 sets of 10 reps


    3 sets of 12 reps







    Conclusion

    There are many aspects involved in preparing an athlete for the biggest job interview of their life. As performance specialists we must take each aspect and individualize it to help our clients achieve a top-notch performance. With knowledge and preparation comes confidence and with confidence comes a better chance of elite performance. Strength training goals should be to address injuries and rehabilitation concerns, strengthen areas that are susceptible to injury prior to or during training, pro day or combine, help increase 225 rep max, increase power by increasing strength, and to help attain desired weight and body composition. These 5 aspects of strength training, applied to an individualized basis, along with teaching the skills of combine success, will give your client that ability to increase their chances of getting drafted or signed as a free agent. This incredible achievement will also give you great pride in helping this athlete achieve their lifelong dream on what might be your clients greatest day; Draft Day.







    REFERENCES

    1. <
    2. Abdo, J. Injury Prevention through weight training-the balanced approach. NSCA Journal. PP. 30-31. 1985
    3. Blazervich, J. Optimizing Hip Musculature for greater sprint running speed. Strength and Conditioning Journal. Vol 22, No 2., pp. 22-27. <
    4. Sports Speed. Champaign, IL. Human Kinetics.
    5. Shankman, G. Hamstring Training: Injury Prevention and Care. NSCA Journa.l Volume 15, No. 4, pp. 37-41. 1993
    6. Mayhew, J.L; Ware, J.S.; Bemben, M.G.; Wilt, B.; Ward, T.E.; Farris, B.; Juraszek, J.; Slovak, J.P. The NFL 225 test as a measure of Bench Press Strength in College Football Players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. Vol. 13, No. 2, 130-134. 1999
    Santana, J.C. Hamstrings of Steel: Preventing the Pull, Part I- Isolated Versus Integrated Function. Strength and Conditioning Journal. Vol. 22, No. 6, 35-36. 2000.

    6. Santana, J.C. Hamstrings of Steel: Preventing the Pull, Part II- Training the “Triple Threat.” Strength and Conditioning Journal. Vol. 23. No. 1. 2000
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  3. As far as The Keto diet (Like from DiPasquale) Vs. A Timed Carb Diet, like IA was talking about, which would be more effective for losing fat and gaining or keeping muscle at the same time?

  4. I don't know about the TKD because I have never used it for myself or for others. I can tell you that the Anabolic Diet as per DiPasquale was in his words "Designed as an anabolic steroid replacement program".

    Well, of course it's not as incredible as some of the cycles you see here or there. But you can be on it all year long if you want to and in my experience you will get results that are close to juicing IN THE LONGER TERM. Do an 8-week cycle of Fina and an 8-week keto diet and the Fina wins hands down. Over a 1-year or 2-year period, it becomes much more debatable which one is best.

    The DiPasquale diet is hands-down the very best for losing fat for the simple reason that you adapt your metabolism to burnin ONLY fat for ALL your fuel needs. Imagine what having your fat-burning pathway so stimulated that it can get you through brutal weights workouts. That's it, this is the way to do it. Burning fat on this diet is not something you have to work at, it happens with perfect ease. But the first 2-3 weeks are hard and that is the price for it.

  5. I tried BSF for a month and had great results until I re-injured my right knee in the 4th week. My father is a radiologist so Im going to pass some tests and make sure nothing's too wrong. I couldnt even do Push Presses anymore...
    •   
       


  6. Hey guys, I am reading the Anabolic Diet by DiPasquale right now and it's interesting to say the least. My question is what kind of training/cardio goes best with this diet?

  7. Your usual training is fine on this diet. Bodybuilding is what it was designed for.

  8. And as far as taking carbs post workout with protein, do you just skip the carbs?

  9. Is counting calories important to lose fat with Keto?

  10. With the most hardcore ketogenic, which is what I describe here, you'll lose fat unless you are way above maintenance calorie levels.

    So you might say that counting calories is NOT important. Of course, it is such a different way of eating that you will want to use something such as fitday.com to enter what you eat and get an idea of how much calories you are taking in. If your maintenance is 2500 and you take in 4000 you'll have trouble losing the fat.

    Otherwise, you'll lose it without even trying. Of course, the RATE of fatloss is dependent on the caloric intake and by the time you're 200kcals UNDER maintenance you lose it FAST. One big reason for this is that a lot of ketones go unburned into your urine so that you end up burning much less than 9 calories per gram of fat that you metabolize.

  11. I have hard time to go above the maintenance level while bulking so this shouldnt too much of a hassle. I started this morning and I'm really psyched about going through this. If I lose too much weight as weeks go by, should I be scared that it is muscle? I mean, should I lose 2lbs a week or does it matter?

  12. Well at first you're going to lose a lot of water, unless you go crazy on the cold cuts... And losing the carbs inside your muscles makes them look a little flat, which will probably make you think like "YIKES! At this rate, I'm going to look like a 12-year-old in a month!" And it's wrong.

    You will retain all your strength. And grow more as it goes on of course. Don't TRY to lose this or that much a week. It's not important for you. Your goal is to grow stronger and of course the incredible stamina that you will have by week 4 or 5 on this. Earlier, maybe.

    Still, I encourage you to enter your foods in a fitday.com diary just to see how you're doing. Drop it after a couple of weeks if you want to, when you've got a feel of how much food is how many calories.

    You'll lose the fat no matter what. Don't TRY. Just train for your goals. By christmas you'll be trying to eat pounds of ice cream and huge amounts of pizza to keep your bodyweight up, you'll be so ripped.

  13. Thanks a ton for all these valuable advices... I really appreciate it.

  14. Luna, I have one more question for you!

    I just had a VO2max test in my gym class and it was pretty bad... worse I ever had. On the Canadian chart, Im rated 5 on 100 ?!??!? I did it last year and I was rated 80 on 100. 50 being the average. is it Keto related?

  15. Huh what do you mean DoctorX2k2?
    When did you start it?

    At first, energy is difficult to get when you start a keto... Of course it's keto related, but that is just a transitional phase you're going through. It's hard but it's worth it.

    OK here is what I'd like you to do... Post a DIARY of your keto experiment here. Start a thread and call it "my keto experiment" somewhere on the board. Me and other ketoers will coach you from there.

    That way, you'll get the best advice and we'll know EXACTLY where you're coming from.

  16. Alright I'll make a thread in the Nutrition forum
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