BB Vs. Powerlifting (Bodybuilders are lost)

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    BB Vs. Powerlifting (Bodybuilders are lost)


    BB Vs. Powerlifting (Bodybuilders are lost)

    I posted this some time ago and had a lot of posts beating me up thinking I was against bodybuilding. Nothing could be further from the truth. While I have spent time primarily devoted to powerlifting (even did a few contests) I am and always have been primarily a bodybuilder and my articles and posts are directed towards bodybuilders

    I often look at the training scene in total amazement. Bodybuilding, which is much more popular than any of the weightlifting sectors is dominated by training information and methods that simply DON'T work for the people using them. Look at the mindset of most BB's and you will see they are more interested in gear usage and esoteric substances than what is really important---their training protocol and diet. Guy's, how many of you have been over to any of the powerlifting boards? Look at what the guys over there post about--their training. You see in powerlifting it's really simple, if the lifts are going up the PL'ers are happy and know they are on track to reaching their goals. BB'ers are more often looking in the mirror to see if they are getting a pump and totally confused about their training.

    You need to be focused on adding weight to the bar or increasing your reps or both. And I mean every damn time you train. Not just sometimes. PL'ers as a whole do much more moderate gear doses and focus on their training. And PL'ers train much more conservatively then BB'ers. While BB'ers as a whole focus on their gear use and try to use it to shore up their faulty training techniques. If more BB'ers trained like PL'ers their would be a lot more muscle on the planet. Become a "powerbuilder" and you will probably be more satisfied with your physique.


    Now that that was said, I absolutely KNOW there are a LOT of trainees out there that have trained for a long time and just are not wired to get real strong. IF you have focused on strength for a fair period of at LEAST 2-3 years on a good solid BASIC style routine AND have been getting at LEAST 1.5-2 grams of protein a day. If you have done this and are at the point that you KNOW you just are never going to be very strong please stay tuned because I have an article coming out that will tell you what to do to make the most of your situation.

    Iron Addict

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    Lookin forward to your article IA...this just (now) seems like common sense. For years I trained like a bber, and in the last couple of years have trained more for strength and have added more muscle size than I did in all those previous years combined. I'll never go back.
  3. PC1
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    I would just like to say that I am successfully incorporating IA and DC's training and diet phillosophy as posted here on AM. What they say makes a lot of sense to me. I have to admit that I've been more of a volume style trainer for many years now, and was skeptical of only doing 1 really intense set of power lifts as the core of a training routine. Then again, I have largely been lifting the same damned weights week in and week out for the past several years as well! I've recently re-written my training routine around their advice, training only 3 times a week utilizing the 3 main power lifts, (pulling day 1/pushing day 3/legs day 5/2 days rest) and 1 intense set after several warm ups, focused on at least 1 more rep than the previously logged performance.

    For the first time in a LONG time I am really enjoying each work out (off cycle), and find myself looking forward to the next one. Training naturally, I typically would approach a workout with dread and fatigue. Rather than counting the "days" until my next cycle, in fact, I'm enjoying training naturally, and decided to train naturally, most likely until Spring of 2004. And the great thing is I'm making both size and strength gains post cycle!

    I frankly had thought for years now that I was at a genetic maximum at 43 years of age, having been lifting for many years now. I was accustomed to feeling tired and run down training naturally, and considered that part of the recovery process while training hard and natural when at or near one's limits. I can't tell you how much better I feel, and how much more energy I have for all other activities in my life. I'm both stronger and have more natural muscle mass than at any other time in my life.

    I know you both are not the first to preach the HIT style of training, with ever increasing reps/weight here on AM. But somehow the way you guys have written about it convinced me it was worth trying...... that and no carbs after 6:00 pm

    I'm very grateful for your advice and direction, and look forward to reading more of your advice as you post it.

    Thanks a million!
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  4. LunaHotel's Avatar
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    Yeah, heck, I'm writing an article called "The Benfits of Overtraining" that explain exactly why training like Arnold describes in "Pumping Iron" is exactly what one needs to do in order to make massive gains... Later, when he learns to train "properly", more like a powerlifter...

    EDIT : How come this comes across as a "smartass" post? Oh, well. That is not my intent here and, to a point, I totally agree with IA.
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    Luna,

    You may be right. Everybody, class dismissed, no need to read anymore of this rubbish. You can save your time here and surf for porn instead. Just go out, buy Arnold's "Education of a Bodybuilder" (I bought my copy in 1978) and jump right into his 20 sets a bodpart 6 day a week routine. If Luna is right you will be on your way to success!

    Only thing I didn't mention is a full 95% of you, yes about 95 out of 100 will fail miserably, but please do give it a try (I'm sure many of you have, I know I did). It will give you a better appreciation of what does work for genetically typical trainees.

    Iron Addict
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    Originally posted by PC1

    For the first time in a LONG time I am really enjoying each work out (off cycle), and find myself looking forward to the next one. Training naturally, I typically would approach a workout with dread and fatigue. Rather than counting the "days" until my next cycle, in fact, I'm enjoying training naturally, and decided to train naturally, most likely until Spring of 2004. And the great thing is I'm making both size and strength gains post cycle!

    I hear this all the time. Guys that say they post cycle, when traditionally all most guys are worried about is not losing too much muscle, guys actually are making gains. I have had 4 persoanl training clients tell me in the last month and a half they are making better progress now training clean than when they did gear. Here is something not everyone realizes. LOTS of people get on a cycle, gain the initial 10-15 lbs that comes with the creatine/nutrient loading that gear provides, and then make marginal at best gains until cycle end when they VERY quickly lose the nutrient loading and the small amount of mass they gained. Proper training and diet is where its at. When you add gear to that combo, you REALLY have magic.

    Iron Addict
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    IA, this probably isn't the thread to ask a nutrition question but since PCI brought it up, I will soon (next week) be upping my protein intake to 520 grams/day. I used to eat w a 30/40/30 ratio, but now going for more of a 40/30/30 ratio of P/C/F.

    Anyhow, I'll still be eating 5200 or so cals/day, but carbs will be cut down w/ the extra 100 grams of protein/day. So, minus 100 grams of carbs.

    Do you think I'll see a big difference in fat storage at all? Also, I am going to be able to try and cut out carbs after 6pm but their still will be some.

    So, this diet has made you see a lot of people reduce fat a lot, while still packing on mass?
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    Jergo,

    Lets do this in another thread. And let me know how much you weigh. 520 is a lot unless you are a BIG boy. I like to max out at 2 grams a lb of bodyweight.

    Iron Addict
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    IA, You got PM
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    I was always taught that it's dangerous to "jump-up" in weight. In other words If you warm-up with say 135 and your max is 800 you should do some sets of say 225, 405, etc. before attempting your heaviest weight (or even the heaviest weight you can do for 6-8 reps). Is this just a myth? Is it safe to do one or two very light warm-up sets and then jump into an intense, heavy, all-out set to failure?
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    Originally posted by T-Bar
    I was always taught that it's dangerous to "jump-up" in weight. In other words If you warm-up with say 135 and your max is 800 you should do some sets of say 225, 405, etc. before attempting your heaviest weight (or even the heaviest weight you can do for 6-8 reps). Is this just a myth? Is it safe to do one or two very light warm-up sets and then jump into an intense, heavy, all-out set to failure?
    i find doing progressively heavier sets works best for basically two reasons. My muscles get used to the heavier weight and when i'm ready to do the "working sets" my muscles are ready to go. Secondly, especially if I'm going for a pb that day on whatever lift, it helps me prepare mentally. At least this is how it works for me.
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    That seems absolutely right, msclbldrguy. I have been using this kind of warmup also, to great effect. Actually I took the exact warmup method that AST recommends, which one may read since our friend blindfaith has contributed the url at http://www.anabolicminds.com/forum/s...=&threadid=803

    in this forums' "common training styles" here : http://www.anabolicminds.com/forum/s...&threadid=1388

    Anyways, these guys recommend to warmup with progressive weights, maybe 5 warmup sets in all prior to doing the first heavy set, up to a warmup of ONE REP with your "Heavy" weight. It truly works great. They call that one-rep-warmup the "Weight accustomization rep" or somesuch.
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