Fast Twitch Hypertrophy

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  1. Fast Twitch Hypertrophy


    How would one go about increasing fast twitch fiber size?

    My Dad read something somewhere about a program by Phil Campbell and has been thinking about buying his book. Here are Phil's related links:

    Ready set Go Fitness official Website
    Speed Training for Sports


    Is there any merit to increase overall size with this (bodybuilding applications), or is it primarily for old time athletes trying to make a comeback like my Pops?


  2. I 'll do fast twitch exercises to begin my workout then superset with slow twitch, the end result total annihalation of said muscles.
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  3. Quote Originally Posted by TheUnlikelyToad View Post
    How would one go about increasing fast twitch fiber size?

    My Dad read something somewhere about a program by Phil Campbell and has been thinking about buying his book. Here are Phil's related links:

    Ready set Go Fitness official Website
    Speed Training for Sports

    If you are bodybuilding or practicing high-intensity cardio you should already be increasing fast twitch fiber size. Unless you are doing reps of 30.

    Is there any merit to increase overall size with this (bodybuilding applications), or is it primarily for old time athletes trying to make a comeback like my Pops?
    Could you clarify this statement a bit? The reason that ready-set-go fitness seems to focus very much on the older crowd is probably due to the fact that fast twitch muscles atrophy as we age (if you don't use it you lose it). As we know, older people have a problem with lack of muscle and strength, so bodybuilding/strength training becomes very beneficial as we age.

  4. Heavy, heavy weights with low reps is the only way to really hit the fast twitch fibers.

    You body follows a recruitment pattern when it comes to using muscle cells and motor units. Your body will always try to use slow twitch first, but depends on the weight lifted. Meaning the heavier the weight, the more fast twitch that will be recruited and the quicker they will be recruited.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by CRUNCH View Post
    Heavy, heavy weights with low reps is the only way to really hit the fast twitch fibers.

    You body follows a recruitment pattern when it comes to using muscle cells and motor units. Your body will always try to use slow twitch first, but depends on the weight lifted. Meaning the heavier the weight, the more fast twitch that will be recruited and the quicker they will be recruited.
    So it's not a matter of low weight and explosive reps? I was under that assumption... but I'll take your word if you're pretty sure on this.

    Thanks for actually offering some insight to my question.
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by dontknowaboutme View Post
    If you are bodybuilding or practicing high-intensity cardio you should already be increasing fast twitch fiber size. Unless you are doing reps of 30.



    Could you clarify this statement a bit?
    My dad is 48 and a former almost pro football player. I think he would like to get back into what he thinks might be similar training. That, or he just wants to seriously vary his normal routine.

    I rather have him spend tha money on a few key health supplements personally.

  7. In that light, you could do lower weights as long as the reps were very explosive. That's kind of the premise behind plyometrics.

    Explosive reps are kind of tough with squats and a bar...LOL. But doing a body weight squat and exploding upwards into a jump would hit fast twitch.

    Are you training for a sport that involves explosive strength?

  8. Quote Originally Posted by CRUNCH View Post
    Are you training for a sport that involves explosive strength?
    See above post...

    Unfortunately, my dad doesn't feel tha need to squat.

  9. LOL...understood.

  10. bodybuilding's goal is the development of fast twitch fibers. thats why people who work out get bigger muscles. These fast twitch fibers are the ones that grow larger in diameter through weight training.

    If you are doing reps higher than 15, you'd be hitting slow twitch fibers primarily.

  11. I have this vague memory of one of my college professors saying that bodybuilders, on average, had more slow-twitch muscle fibers than the average person.

    I searched for about 10 minutes and couldn't find an answer either way. There may not be an answer either way.

    I'm tired now though, so maybe I'll look around some more tomorrow.

  12. I pulled out my physiology textbook, it says here:

    "Fast glycolytic fibers are the last to be recruited because they are found in the large motor units. These fibers are not usually recruited unless a muscle is generating a large amount of force, as occurs in high intensity exercises such as weight-lifting or sprinting." -Human Physiology, Germann and Stanfield 2001 published by Benjamin Cummings

    Crunch, Slow twitch fibers are the high oxidative ones meaning they're the ones that are the endurance fibers.


    As far as fiber type populations in muscles, it varies from person to person. Its all based on genetics. check out this thread about fiber type distribution:
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/exerc...ow-twitch.html

  13. I know what fast and slow twitch fibers are, I've got a masters in ex phys.

    Bodybuilding is quite different from weight-lifting or sprinting. I was talking about fiber type displacement differences in bodybuilders as compared to a normal human being. Bodybuilding is not an "explosive" sport. I imagine that when you your book refers to "weight lifters", they are referring to olympic lifting.

    I'm not saying they don't have a large number of fast twitch fibers or slow twitch. Just that I thought I remembered hearing that they had a larger number of slow-twitch. I will research that some more tomorrow.

  14. Still can't find any definitive studies. But several said that fast-twitch were the ones most likely to respond to hypertrophy-type training. So who knows what I was remembering from kolege! LOL!

  15. Ain't this some sh*t, lol.

    Maybe we need some Bobo for clarification.

    Bottom line is, can you enlarge tha muscle fibers commonly associated with speed/explosiveness/endurance and if so how?

  16. Quote Originally Posted by TheUnlikelyToad View Post
    Bottom line is, can you enlarge tha muscle fibers commonly associated with speed/explosiveness/endurance and if so how?
    Yes. Heavy weights and explosive movements for speed and explosiveness. Light weights and higher reps for endurance.

  17. how can you be a "former almost pro football player"

    isnt that like saying he didnt make it?

  18. Quote Originally Posted by brass monkey View Post
    does that clear it up
    idk, i just dont understand what that had to do with anything

  19. Quote Originally Posted by NCSU33 View Post
    how can you be a "former almost pro football player"

    isnt that like saying he didnt make it?
    Pretty much... He was signed as an Eagles Free Agent in '81.

    $500 signing bonus back then.

  20. Your body adapts to whatever type of training you give it. Remember your body is always looking to be efficient. Look at a sprinter, marathon runner, a swimmer, and a gymnast. There's your answer. Just think about what the difference is between these 4 athletes. They are living examples of how to train slow twitch as well as fast.

  21. Quote Originally Posted by TheUnlikelyToad View Post
    Maybe we need some Bobo for clarification.
    There should be a button next to the Reps and Report Post buttons with a clown face... "Call In the Clown". Bobo would then be summoned to give a succinct one-line answer that clarifies the whole issue and makes all others look like the fools that we are. He does seem to have a knack for doing that anyway, though, even without the button.

  22. Crunch although it's true bodybuilding is different from say sprinting there's a lot we can learn from that athlete. Upper body in a sprinter is usually well built but pale in comparison to their quads, glutes, and hams. What we have to look at is the leg training and grueling way those muslces are worked day in and day out. We should be asking how can they work those muscle groups everyday and still recover to get that kind of growth. THe answer is the amount of fast twitch muslce fibers they've created in their lower body.


    Quote Originally Posted by CRUNCH View Post
    I know what fast and slow twitch fibers are, I've got a masters in ex phys.

    Bodybuilding is quite different from weight-lifting or sprinting. I was talking about fiber type displacement differences in bodybuilders as compared to a normal human being. Bodybuilding is not an "explosive" sport. I imagine that when you your book refers to "weight lifters", they are referring to olympic lifting.

    I'm not saying they don't have a large number of fast twitch fibers or slow twitch. Just that I thought I remembered hearing that they had a larger number of slow-twitch. I will research that some more tomorrow.

  23. In world-class sprinters or pro athletes of any sport for that matter, I think a lot of it comes down to recovery ability. They are able to recover from all those long grueling workouts and continue to get bigger, faster, and stronger.

    Plus the genetic component to what kinds of fibers they were born with. Those sprinters had waaaay more fast-twitch cells in those legs (and everywhere else) since they were born.

    Add those genetics with years of brutal workouts, and the dedication and determinitation to be the best, and you've got a world class athlete.

  24. Quote Originally Posted by CRUNCH View Post
    In world-class sprinters or pro athletes of any sport for that matter, I think a lot of it comes down to recovery ability. They are able to recover from all those long grueling workouts and continue to get bigger, faster, and stronger.

    Plus the genetic component to what kinds of fibers they were born with. Those sprinters had waaaay more fast-twitch cells in those legs (and everywhere else) since they were born.

    Add those genetics with years of brutal workouts, and the dedication and determinitation to be the best, and you've got a world class athlete.
    I hear ya and agree completely so I think the answer to the orginal question is years of brutal training will increase your type II's

  25. Quote Originally Posted by jminis View Post
    I hear ya and agree completely so I think the answer to the orginal question is years of brutal training will increase your type II's
    yup... and your genetics.
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