Don't Underestimate Overtraining

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    Don't Underestimate Overtraining


    Here are are the first in a series of articles that are a very good read.

     

    1)  http://www.mafgroup.com/sports/sport...m_012703.shtml

    2)  http://www.mafgroup.com/sports/phys-ed/pe_021003.shtml

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    Good reads ww7...

    For those too lazy to click the links

    Don't underestimate overtraining

    By Dr. Phil Maffetone


    First in a Series

    For most athletes who compete in summertime sports, any signs or symptoms of overtraining should be gone by this time of the year, and a good training plan to prevent overtraining later in the year is vital.

    Overtraining has been traditionally described as diminished performance that results from an increase in training volume and/or intensity. This may result from excess number and/or intensity of workouts, lack of recovery, or both.

    This multifactorial problem is referred to as the overtraining syndrome and is associated with neurological, metabolic, and muscular signs and symptoms. When I was in practice I was astounded by the number of athletes who had problems associated with overtraining. In fact, most athletes fell into this category.

    Prevention and correction of the overtraining syndrome begins with assessment. Observing the subtle symptoms in their earliest stages are crucial to the prevention of further regression. The MAF Test, as described in my book Training for Endurance, is a powerful tool for assessing overtraining as it begins to develop, and may provide the first objective sign.

    In this article I would like to provide an overview of the full spectrum of overtraining. In the following weeks we will explore the three stages of the problem as it progresses to exhaustion. The three stages of the overtraining syndrome are:

    Functional Overtraining. The onset and earliest stage where very subtle indicators can clue you in that you're heading for more serious problems.


    Sympathetic Overtraining. In this stage, the overactivity of certain nervous and hormonal factors cause a variety of signs and symptoms. However, it should be noted that during this stage of overtraining, some athletes perform exceptionally well, only to fall apart soon afterwards.


    Parasympathetic overtraining. A stage resulting from the exhaustion of nervous and hormonal factors which also drag down muscle function.
    The overtraining syndrome typically results in poor performance and structural injury. In addition, secondary chemical injuries such as fatigue and infection, as well as altered mood states and reproductive function, are evident. Note that the diminished performance associated with overtraining occurs not only in competitive athletes but also in people performing everyday chores.

    An athlete's lifestyle may also contribute to overtraining; this aspect of overtraining was recognized as early as 1923. To date, however, mainstream medicine has not produced a standard assessment or treatment process for the full spectrum of overtraining

    However, it is evident that overtraining is a highly individual problem, the onset of which is subtle (functional) and often ignored or not recognized. It produces not just physical signs and symptoms, but various complaints that are without organic disease.

    In future MAF Sports reports we will explore the details of these three levels of overtraining and what a person may do to remedy the situation. For those who wish to "jump ahead of the class," this information is also presented in my books Training for Endurance and Complementary Sports Medicine.
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    Functional Overtraining: Stage I

    By Dr. Phil Maffetone


    Second in a Series

    The first stage of the overtraining syndrome is referred to as "Functional Overtraining" because it is not accompanied by classical symptoms but rather by very subtle, or subclinical problems.

    Oddly enough, this stage of overtraining also is sometimes accompanied by a sudden and dramatic improvement in competitive performance that may convince you that training is progressing well.

    During this stage, the MAF Test, as discussed in Training for Endurance, may be the first indicator of overtraining by demonstrating an abnormal plateau or regression, as compared to the normal plateau and progress.

    Another problem associated with functional overtraining is an imbalance between aerobic and anaerobic function. While this may be determined by a professional through a proper history, exam or other tests, anyone can compare his or her maximum aerobic function and maximum anaerobic function. Since aerobic function can be measured with the MAF Test and anaerobic function by competitive performance or time trial, an imbalance is evident, for example, if you can compete at high levels but achieve proportionately slow scores on the MAF Test.

    Functional overtraining probably is synonymous with overreaching, which has been shown in studies to boost performance but often turns into overtraining. Decreased performance levels are not evident until middle and later stages of overtraining, for example, during more obvious imbalance.

    Functional overtraining may also be associated with adrenal-gland dysfunction in its earliest stage, typically paralleling aerobic deficiency. An understanding of adrenal dysfunction and aerobic deficiency, and the recognition of functional symptoms, can be a significant deterrent against overtraining.

    In addition to the above symptoms of overtraining, other problems begin in the functional overtraining period and continue through the second and third stage of overtraining. These may include fatigue, sleeping irregularities and hunger. It may also include the inability to lose extra body fat, and occasionally an increase in body fat. Athletes may have difficulty getting out of bed, get sleepy after meals, and have an uncanny craving for sweets or caffeine. Other complaints common in those who are in the first stage of overtraining include:

    Increasing vulnerability to back, knee, ankle, and foot injuries.


    Adrenal gland dysfunction - typically a higher than normal cortisol, and lower testosterone and DHEA levels.


    Premenstrual syndrome and menopausal symptoms may be secondary complaints for women, but amenorrhea is the most common hormonal problem in overtrained women.


    Sexual dysfunction may be a problem for both sexes, typically producing reduced sexual desire and sometimes infertility.


    Mental and emotional stress, including mild or clinical depression and anxiety is not uncommon.
    If you think you might be in this first stage of functional overtraining, you are fortunate, as you may be able to turn it around before the problem progresses to the next stages, which are much more difficult to remedy. The specific training and dietary guidelines are discussed in my books.

    In future MAF Sports reports we will explore the details of the second and third levels of overtraining and what a person may do to reverse the condition. For those who wish to "stay ahead of the class," this information is also presented in my books Training for Endurance and Complementary Sports Medicine.
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    Thanks bro. I need to figure out how you did that with out all the coding errors.
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    Is it safe to assume that when you quote it, the coding issues go away??
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    Originally posted by windwords7
    Is it safe to assume that when you quote it, the coding issues go away??
    Bro how are you copying the files? You shouldn't get any coding in the post, for example:

    --------- COPIED FROM THE LINK ABOVE -----------------------------

    Don't underestimate overtraining

    By Dr. Phil Maffetone


    First in a Series

    For most athletes who compete in summertime sports, any signs or symptoms of overtraining should be gone by this time of the year, and a good training plan to prevent overtraining later in the year is vital.

    Overtraining has been traditionally described as diminished performance that results from an increase in training volume and/or intensity. This may result from excess number and/or intensity of workouts, lack of recovery, or both.

    This multifactorial problem is referred to as the overtraining syndrome and is associated with neurological, metabolic, and muscular signs and symptoms. When I was in practice I was astounded by the number of athletes who had problems associated with overtraining. In fact, most athletes fell into this category.

    Prevention and correction of the overtraining syndrome begins with assessment. Observing the subtle symptoms in their earliest stages are crucial to the prevention of further regression. The MAF Test, as described in my book Training for Endurance, is a powerful tool for assessing overtraining as it begins to develop, and may provide the first objective sign.

    In this article I would like to provide an overview of the full spectrum of overtraining. In the following weeks we will explore the three stages of the problem as it progresses to exhaustion. The three stages of the overtraining syndrome are:

    Functional Overtraining. The onset and earliest stage where very subtle indicators can clue you in that you're heading for more serious problems.


    Sympathetic Overtraining. In this stage, the overactivity of certain nervous and hormonal factors cause a variety of signs and symptoms. However, it should be noted that during this stage of overtraining, some athletes perform exceptionally well, only to fall apart soon afterwards.


    Parasympathetic overtraining. A stage resulting from the exhaustion of nervous and hormonal factors which also drag down muscle function.
    The overtraining syndrome typically results in poor performance and structural injury. In addition, secondary chemical injuries such as fatigue and infection, as well as altered mood states and reproductive function, are evident. Note that the diminished performance associated with overtraining occurs not only in competitive athletes but also in people performing everyday chores.

    An athlete's lifestyle may also contribute to overtraining; this aspect of overtraining was recognized as early as 1923. To date, however, mainstream medicine has not produced a standard assessment or treatment process for the full spectrum of overtraining

    However, it is evident that overtraining is a highly individual problem, the onset of which is subtle (functional) and often ignored or not recognized. It produces not just physical signs and symptoms, but various complaints that are without organic disease.

    In future MAF Sports reports we will explore the details of these three levels of overtraining and what a person may do to remedy the situation. For those who wish to "jump ahead of the class," this information is also presented in my books Training for Endurance and Complementary Sports Medicine.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just highlight the text with your cursor and do the following

    1. After highlighting the text hold down "Ctrl" + "c" to copy.
    2. In the forum post screen just press "Ctrl" + "v" to paste.
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    LMAO Draven! Im all good on cutting pasting bro. Thanks though. When I cut and paste in the "post a reply" function I get a very screwed up post. I will show you in the next post.
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    Originally posted by windwords7
    LMAO Draven! Im all good on cutting pasting bro. Thanks though. When I cut and paste in the "post a reply" function I get a very screwed up post. I will show you in the next post.
    Sorry, but you'd be surprised how many over look such a simple thing.
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    Like that one Draven!!?? Pisses me off.
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    OK, does it do that if you just paste the text in to note pad? You may have IE set to copy the source code and not the visible text or something cause that's the source code of the page.
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    Not in note pad bro and you cant see it when I paste right away either. Its once I hit submit that it comes out.
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    Dude, turn off the WYSIWYG in your options panel of the UserCP, that's what's doing it I think. See...
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    Let's try this again.....

    Don't underestimate overtraining

    By Dr. Phil Maffetone


    First in a Series

    For most athletes who compete in summertime sports, any signs or symptoms of overtraining should be gone by this time of the year, and a good training plan to prevent overtraining later in the year is vital.

    Overtraining has been traditionally described as diminished performance that results from an increase in training volume and/or intensity. This may result from excess number and/or intensity of workouts, lack of recovery, or both.

    This multifactorial problem is referred to as the overtraining syndrome and is associated with neurological, metabolic, and muscular signs and symptoms. When I was in practice I was astounded by the number of athletes who had problems associated with overtraining. In fact, most athletes fell into this category.

    Prevention and correction of the overtraining syndrome begins with assessment. Observing the subtle symptoms in their earliest stages are crucial to the prevention of further regression. The MAF Test, as described in my book Training for Endurance, is a powerful tool for assessing overtraining as it begins to develop, and may provide the first objective sign.

    In this article I would like to provide an overview of the full spectrum of overtraining. In the following weeks we will explore the three stages of the problem as it progresses to exhaustion. The three stages of the overtraining syndrome are:

    Functional Overtraining. The onset and earliest stage where very subtle indicators can clue you in that you're heading for more serious problems.


    Sympathetic Overtraining. In this stage, the overactivity of certain nervous and hormonal factors cause a variety of signs and symptoms. However, it should be noted that during this stage of overtraining, some athletes perform exceptionally well, only to fall apart soon afterwards.


    Parasympathetic overtraining. A stage resulting from the exhaustion of nervous and hormonal factors which also drag down muscle function.
    The overtraining syndrome typically results in poor performance and structural injury. In addition, secondary chemical injuries such as fatigue and infection, as well as altered mood states and reproductive function, are evident. Note that the diminished performance associated with overtraining occurs not only in competitive athletes but also in people performing everyday chores.

    An athlete's lifestyle may also contribute to overtraining; this aspect of overtraining was recognized as early as 1923. To date, however, mainstream medicine has not produced a standard assessment or treatment process for the full spectrum of overtraining

    However, it is evident that overtraining is a highly individual problem, the onset of which is subtle (functional) and often ignored or not recognized. It produces not just physical signs and symptoms, but various complaints that are without organic disease.

    In future MAF Sports reports we will explore the details of these three levels of overtraining and what a person may do to remedy the situation. For those who wish to "jump ahead of the class," this information is also presented in my books Training for Endurance and Complementary Sports Medicine.
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    Very good Draven! Thanks bro!
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    Haha, NP. Might want to clean up your thread now though.

    The problem is Chemo has HTML in posts turned off.
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