Differential effects of strength training leading to failure versus not to failure on

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    Differential effects of strength training leading to failure versus not to failure on


    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of 11 wk of resistance training to failure vs. nonfailure, followed by an identical 5-wk peaking period of maximal strength and power training for both groups as well as to examine the underlying physiological changes in basal circulating anabolic and catabolic hormones. Forty-two physically active men were matched and then randomly assigned to either a training to failure (RF; n = 14), nonfailure (NRF; n = 15), or control groups (C; n = 13). Muscular and power testing and blood draws to determine basal hormonal concentrations were conducted before the initiation of training (T0), after 6 wk of training (T1), after 11 wk of training (T2), and after 16 wk of training (T3). Both RF and NRF resulted in similar gains in 1-repetition maximum bench press (23 and 23%) and parallel squat (22 and 23%), muscle power output of the arm (27 and 28%) and leg extensor muscles (26 and 29%), and maximal number of repetitions performed during parallel squat (66 and 69%). RF group experienced larger gains in the maximal number of repetitions performed during the bench press. The peaking phase (T2 to T3) after NRF resulted in larger gains in muscle power output of the lower extremities, whereas after RF it resulted in larger gains in the maximal number of repetitions performed during the bench press. Strength training leading to RF resulted in reductions in resting concentrations of IGF-1 and elevations in IGFBP-3, whereas NRF resulted in reduced resting cortisol concentrations and an elevation in resting serum total testosterone concentration. This investigation demonstrated a potential beneficial stimulus of NRF for improving strength and power, especially during the subsequent peaking training period, whereas performing sets to failure resulted in greater gains in local muscular endurance. Elevation in IGFBP-3 after resistance training may have been compensatory to accommodate the reduction in IGF-1 to preserve IGF availability.

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    Quote Originally Posted by idunk42
    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of 11 wk of resistance training to failure vs. nonfailure, followed by an identical 5-wk peaking period of maximal strength and power training for both groups as well as to examine the underlying physiological changes in basal circulating anabolic and catabolic hormones. Forty-two physically active men were matched and then randomly assigned to either a training to failure (RF; n = 14), nonfailure (NRF; n = 15), or control groups (C; n = 13). Muscular and power testing and blood draws to determine basal hormonal concentrations were conducted before the initiation of training (T0), after 6 wk of training (T1), after 11 wk of training (T2), and after 16 wk of training (T3). Both RF and NRF resulted in similar gains in 1-repetition maximum bench press (23 and 23%) and parallel squat (22 and 23%), muscle power output of the arm (27 and 28%) and leg extensor muscles (26 and 29%), and maximal number of repetitions performed during parallel squat (66 and 69%). RF group experienced larger gains in the maximal number of repetitions performed during the bench press. The peaking phase (T2 to T3) after NRF resulted in larger gains in muscle power output of the lower extremities, whereas after RF it resulted in larger gains in the maximal number of repetitions performed during the bench press. Strength training leading to RF resulted in reductions in resting concentrations of IGF-1 and elevations in IGFBP-3, whereas NRF resulted in reduced resting cortisol concentrations and an elevation in resting serum total testosterone concentration. This investigation demonstrated a potential beneficial stimulus of NRF for improving strength and power, especially during the subsequent peaking training period, whereas performing sets to failure resulted in greater gains in local muscular endurance. Elevation in IGFBP-3 after resistance training may have been compensatory to accommodate the reduction in IGF-1 to preserve IGF availability.
    Great post
    It once again confirms my experience/reasearch that training to failure (other than occasional plataeu breakers ) is only good if
    1)you possess incredible genetic gifts (and those guys did'nt always train that way anyway)
    2)you have lots of Dbol
    3)Arthur Jones is insulting you
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    Yeah, read that some time ago.

    The only issue I have with this study is that none of the groups gained any weight (or lost any fat). So, where it does prove that strength increases it does not make any statements on pure hypertrophy.

    Also (sadly) the study does not reference if the subjects (that spanish sports team - don't remember what sport it was) used resistance training as regular part of their training program.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocketscientist
    Yeah, read that some time ago.

    The only issue I have with this study is that none of the groups gained any weight (or lost any fat). So, where it does prove that strength increases it does not make any statements on pure hypertrophy.

    Also (sadly) the study does not reference if the subjects (that spanish sports team - don't remember what sport it was) used resistance training as regular part of their training program.
    I believe this is the same study quoted on T nation.
    I find their conclusions interesting.............paraph rasing.
    This study demonstrates the potential benefits of NOT training to failure, however doing so may result in (my quotaions) "more muscular endurance, particulary in the upper body"
    why?
    Because the exercise used was the bench press?...what if it had been the leg press?
    I have actually seen a similar study in which just that exercise was used to gauge results, the study had identical parameters
    those T nation guys crack me up some times..they are also running Dardens 4 training to failure w/o's in two weeks........add 3/8ths of an inch to your upper arms
    (apparently its a standard 3/8ths, regardless of arm size prior to the exercise program....... )
    and you win A FREE HAT!
    man , how come nobody gives away free hats here?
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    Don't know if it's the same. Here's the reference
    Differential effects of strength training leading to failure versus not to failure on hormonal responses, strength, and muscle power gains.

    They let the guys do squats etc. it's all described above. The particularity of this study is that they use trained athletes, not random people from the street that never touched weights before
  

  
 

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