Lifting Heavy Weight is Dangerous! - AnabolicMinds.com

Lifting Heavy Weight is Dangerous!

  1. Banned
    YellowJacket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    0
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Lifting Heavy Weight is Dangerous!


    According to the Wallstreet Journal

    Heavy weightlifting can prove danger
    By Kevin Helliker, The Wall Street Journal
    March 17, 2003

    As a fitness trainer and health fanatic, Michael Logan knew that weight lifting could strengthen his bones and protect his heart.

    What he didn't know was that it could be lethal. Logan had a bulge in his primary artery, the aorta. Knowledge of that bulge, or aneurysm, would have prompted doctors to allow only light-weight lifting. But like the vast majority of people with aneurysms, Logan didn't know he had one.

    So he continued heavy-weight lifting until an aortic aneurysm killed him last June at age 46.

    "It's very surprising that something he did for his health might have hurt him," says Mike Logan, the late Chicago trainer's son.

    In a nation obsessed with looks and fitness, weight lifting is the latest workout craze. Recent studies have shown that lifting can lower blood pressure, combat diabetes and strengthen bones. Bookstore shelves are teeming with new fitness tomes touting weight lifting. Over the three years ended in 2001, participation in weight lifting in the U.S. has risen 12 percent while aerobic exercise declined 2 percent, according to American Sports Data Inc.

    Now, however, a small but growing number of researchers are raising concerns about the safety of lifting heavy weights. Such lifting can trigger strokes and aneurysms, and perhaps even cause a highly fatal arterial disease called dissection, believe doctors at prominent health centers such as Yale University School of Medicine and the Stanford University Medical Center.

    Aneurysms alone kill 32,000 Americans a year, making them as big a killer as prostate cancer, and a more common killer than brain cancer or AIDS. Especially vulnerable to aneurysm and other arterial conditions are senior citizens a group that has been urged to take advantage of the bone-strengthening effects of weight lifting.

    Aneurysm experts express little concern about moderate- to light-weight lifting. Some define light as an amount that can be lifted 60 times, in four sets of 15. A leading aneurysm researcher and surgeon, John Elefteriades of the Yale University School of Medicine, recommends that people older than 40 bench-press no more than half their body weight. Equally important is breathing regularly during exercise to minimize spikes in blood pressure.

    Aneurysms aren't the only concern for heavy-weight lifters. Vascular experts say it can induce stroke as well as dissection, in which the inner lining of the aortic artery separates from the outer walls.

    Heavy-weight lifting can spike blood pressure to dangerous heights. In maximum-effort lifting, which pits a participant against the most weight he can hoist one time, studies have shown that blood pressure rises to as high as 370/360 from a resting rate of 130/80. Conventional blood-pressure monitors can't even measure levels higher than 300. "At that level, nobody would be surprised if you had a stroke," says Franz Messerli, a hypertension specialist at the Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans.

    John Robertson witnessed just such an event one day when he was lifting weights as a medical student. Lifting beside Robertson was a fellow medical student who suddenly keeled over backward. A vessel in his brain had ruptured. The student was rushed to the hospital and survived.

    "During the time that you're lifting, the pressure on the artery wall is intense," says Robertson, chief of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif.

    Doctors have long suspected that the steep blood-pressure spikes arising from heavy-weight lifting could trigger ruptures of already weakened vessels. Now, suspicion is growing that such lifting can damage healthy vessels. Yale's Elefteriades has shown in a lab experiment that intense pressure can induce dissection, often requiring emergency open-heart surgery.

    Dissection typically occurs in older adults, or those who have a family history or who suffer from a syndrome called Marfan's disease. Yet Elefteriades has treated two young dissection victims who had none of the traditional risk factors but who were heavy-weight lifters. Similarly, a study conducted at Los Angeles County Harbor-UCLA Medical Center profiled four men (aged 22, 34, 37 and 57) who entered the emergency room suffering dissection all heavy-weight lifters. Steriod use may increase the risk.

    One option for anyone older than 60 or with a family history of aneurysms or dissection is to get scanned before starting a lifting program. Most aneurysms and dissections can be detected by CT scans. Also, an inexpensive ultrasound test can detect the abdominal aortic aneurysm, which ranks as the nation's 13th-leading cause of death.

  2. Senior Member
    Biggs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,285
    Rep Power
    786

    Reputation

    Originally posted by YellowJacket

    Now, however, a small but growing number of researchers are raising concerns about the safety of lifting heavy weights. Such lifting can trigger strokes and aneurysms, and perhaps even cause a highly fatal arterial disease called dissection, believe doctors at prominent health centers such as Yale University School of Medicine and the Stanford University Medical Center.
    holy horse-**** batman ... the biggest problem in my estimation was that they identified lifting weights as a "craze". of course it would be dangerous... take a middle aged desk jockey guy and start throwing him under a weight bar to lift and strain for all he's worth for probably the first time in his life, with no real prior attention to nutritious diet, and wtf happens? he keels over, and dare I say rightly so? ****ing go off "half cocked" and reap what you sow, in all aspects of life.
  3. Senior Member
    scotty2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,138
    Rep Power
    715

    Reputation

    The same way as running is dangerous and unhealthy. If you're a sedentary, obese 350lb man, you cannot go out and run 20 miles without collapsing and possibly dropping dead. It's all relative.
    •   
       

  4. Elite Member
    BigVrunga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Age
    38
    Posts
    5,063
    Rep Power
    2682

    Reputation

    In a nation obsessed with looks and fitness...
    WHAT?! And how many Americans are overweight or obese? I would say that straining with everything you have for that 1RM could be dangerous. I remember once before I really knew what I was doing I tried to LegPress 800lbs. I strained so hard I almost passed out. Im sure that if I had an anuerism and tried that I could have blown a gasket.

    But hey - who needs heavy weight? We could all just switch to GVT
  5. New Member
    msclbldrguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    344
    Rep Power
    316

    Reputation

    at one time i had hi blood pressure (190/110)! when in college no less and dr would not let me lift...so i started doin mild cardio got my act together and now on my way to making bodybuilding a lifetime pursuit. glad i started when i was young. examples like ferrigno, arnold etc show what you can accomplish even in middle age when you start young and stay with it. but like others here said...you live sedentary for 30 yrs and at 46 decide to lift heavy...no wonder the guy keeled over
  6. New Member
    Irpker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    146

    Reputation

    Originally posted by YellowJacket
    [B]studies have shown that blood pressure rises to as high as 370/360 from a resting rate of 130/80. Conventional blood-pressure monitors can't even measure levels higher than 300.

    So, somebody guestimated 370? Sense please~
  7. Advanced Member
    wardog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    638
    Rep Power
    465

    Reputation

    Bench no more than half your bodyweight? Damn..that would not even be worth getting under the bar for. I might as well go to the bar and chase women
  8. New Member
    msclbldrguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    344
    Rep Power
    316

    Reputation

    Originally posted by wardog
    Bench no more than half your bodyweight? Damn..that would not even be worth getting under the bar for. I might as well go to the bar and chase women
    ya especially since i could do half my current body weight back when i was in 10th grade....thats not even much of a warm up anymore!

    seriously, thats the prob. esp with former jocks who think they can start out where they left off 20 or 30 years ago....what surprises me is that there's no more injuries or deaths than there are...
  9. New Member
    dez/null's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Age
    30
    Posts
    155
    Rep Power
    221

    Reputation

    I know a guy whos nearly braindead from running cross country most of his life. It's funny he's a teacher and yet he studders like crazy...I didn't like him very much though since I joined X-C to burn off a lil excess fat that I gained over the summer...Then when I quit to lift for wrestling he had a fit and was calling me a quote "quitter"....lets see I lifted and ran all summer...running hasn't gotten me anywhere so I say **** it im just gonna lift my ass off and wrestle the weight off....now im more experianced with nutrition and so forth so its not hard for me to loose excess weight...sides...bulking is much more fun.
  10. New Member
    msclbldrguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    344
    Rep Power
    316

    Reputation

    Originally posted by dez/null
    I know a guy whos nearly braindead from running cross country most of his life. It's funny he's a teacher and yet he studders like crazy...I didn't like him very much though since I joined X-C to burn off a lil excess fat that I gained over the summer...Then when I quit to lift for wrestling he had a fit and was calling me a quote "quitter"....lets see I lifted and ran all summer...running hasn't gotten me anywhere so I say **** it im just gonna lift my ass off and wrestle the weight off....now im more experianced with nutrition and so forth so its not hard for me to loose excess weight...sides...bulking is much more fun.

    saddest part is he lost the opportunity to teach...and build you and his other athletes up in the process. what a shame. i mean its not like you left because you were too lazy or whatever....he must be brain dead if he thinks you are a quitter because he has no grasp of what kinda drive you have....you're better off without someone like that around. creep.
  

  
 

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Life is short. LIFT heavy things. Buy 1 Get 1 Free!
    By Royd The Noyd in forum Company Promotions
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 03-18-2009, 10:06 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-19-2006, 04:53 PM
  3. heavy weights, no result
    By azzer2000 in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-09-2006, 02:32 PM
  4. heavy weights or moderate
    By Dugyrios in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-21-2006, 05:57 PM
  5. Bread Is Dangerous
    By delta314 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-16-2006, 04:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in