Stretching?

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    Stretching?


    What do you guys do?

    I've heard before a workout, after a workout, only on off days, and not at all.

    I don't like to do it because it's takes time, but I'd do anything to help avoid injuries.

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    I do static stretching after my workout. More and more studies are coming out how static stretching pre-WO decreases power output. For your average lifter (me) it doesn't really matter, but if I were a PLer or athlete I'd cut out static stretching.

    However some people just can't even go into a weight-room without stretching first. For most of us its all a matter of comfort.
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    have any links to these studies? I'm a firm believer of not needing to stretch... but a lot of people ask me why, and I'd like something concrete to back it up.
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    DO NOT STRETCH A COLD MUSCLE!
    FWIW I stretch pwo, not pre...
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    Quote Originally Posted by AldrichAStern
    have any links to these studies? I'm a firm believer of not needing to stretch... but a lot of people ask me why, and I'd like something concrete to back it up.
    Like I said, there are a lot of variables, but I'm seeing more and more of this.

    Acute muscle stretching inhibits muscle strength endurance performance.

    Nelson AG, Kokkonen J, Arnall DA.

    Department of Kinesiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA. anelso@lsu.edu

    Since strength and muscular strength endurance are linked, it is possible that the inhibitory influence that prior stretching has on strength can also extend to the reduction of muscle strength endurance. To date, however, studies measuring muscle strength endurance poststretching have been criticized because of problems with their reliability. The purpose of this study was twofold: both the muscle strength endurance performance after acute static stretching exercises and the repeatability of those differences were measured. Two separate experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, the knee-flexion muscle strength endurance exercise was measured by exercise performed at 60 and 40% of body weight following either a no-stretching or stretching regimen. In experiment 2, using a test-retest protocol, a knee-flexion muscle strength endurance exercise was performed at 50% body weight on 4 different days, with 2 tests following a no-stretching regimen (RNS) and 2 tests following a stretching regimen (RST). For experiment 1, when exercise was performed at 60% of body weight, stretching significantly (p < 0.05) reduced muscle strength endurance by 24%, and at 40% of body weight, it was reduced by 9%. For experiment 2, reliability was high (RNS, intraclass correlation = 0.94; RST, intraclass correlation = 0.97). Stretching also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced muscle strength endurance by 28%. Therefore, it is recommended that heavy static stretching exercises of a muscle group be avoided prior to any performances requiring maximal muscle strength endurance.
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    i find that if i dont do some back stretches before my workout (but after my cardio warm up) im more prone to pulling something. im always stretching stuff during my workouts too.
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    The acute effects of static stretching on peak torque, mean power output, electromyography, and mechanomyography.

    Cramer JT, Housh TJ, Weir JP, Johnson GO, Coburn JW, Beck TW.

    Department of Kinesiology, Exercise Science Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019-0259, USA, jcramer@uta.ed.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of static stretching on peak torque (PT), the joint angle at PT, mean power output (MP), electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles during maximal, voluntary concentric isokinetic leg extensions at 60 and 240 degrees .s(-1) of the stretched and unstretched limbs. Twenty-one volunteers [mean age (SD) 21.5 (1.3) years] performed maximal, voluntary concentric isokinetic leg extensions for the dominant and non-dominant limbs at 60 and 240 degrees .s(-1). Surface EMG (muVrms) and MMG (mVrms) signals were recorded from the VL and RF muscles during the isokinetic tests. PT (Nm), the joint angle at PT, and MP (W) were calculated by a dynamometer. Following the initial isokinetic tests, the dominant leg extensors were stretched using four static stretching exercises. After the stretching, the isokinetic tests were repeated. PT decreased (P</=0.05) from pre- to post-stretching for the stretched limb at 60 and 240 degrees .s(-1) and for the unstretched limb at 60 degrees .s(-1). EMG amplitude of the VL and RF also decreased (P</=0.05) from pre- to post-stretching for the stretched and unstretched limbs. There were no stretching-induced changes (P>0.05) for the joint angle at PT, MP, or MMG amplitude. These findings indicated stretching-induced decreases in force production and muscle activation. The decreases in PT and EMG amplitude for the unstretched limb suggested that the stretching-induced decreases may be due to a central nervous system inhibitory mechanism.
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    The effect of different warm-up stretch protocols on 20 meter sprint performance in trained rugby union players.

    Fletcher IM, Jones B.

    Exercise Physiology Laboratory, University of Luton, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK. i.fletcher@herts.ac.uk

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different static and dynamic stretch protocols on 20-m sprint performance. The 97 male rugby union players were assigned randomly to 4 groups: passive static stretch (PSS; n = 28), active dynamic stretch (ADS; n = 22), active static stretch (ASST; n = 24), and static dynamic stretch (SDS; n = 23). All groups performed a standard 10-minute jog warm-up, followed by two 20-m sprints. The 20-m sprints were then repeated after subjects had performed different stretch protocols. The PSS and ASST groups had a significant increase in sprint time (p < or = 0.05), while the ADS group had a significant decrease in sprint time (p < or = 0.05). The decrease in sprint time, observed in the SDS group, was found to be nonsignificant (p > or = 0.05). The decrease in performance for the 2 static stretch groups was attributed to an increase in the musculotendinous unit (MTU) compliance, leading to a decrease in the MTU ability to store elastic energy in its eccentric phase. The reason why the ADS group improved performance is less clear, but could be linked to the rehearsal of specific movement patterns, which may help increase coordination of subsequent movement. It was concluded that static stretching as part of a warm-up may decrease short sprint performance, whereas active dynamic stretching seems to increase 20-m sprint performance.
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    i do some simple chest and arm streches pre workout, only takes about a minute. i dont do any streching after though.
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    Effects of running, static stretching and practice jumps on explosive force production and jumping performance.

    Young WB, Behm DG.

    School of Human Movement and Sport Sciences, University of Ballarat, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. w.young@ballarat.edu.au

    AIM: The interaction between running, stretching and practice jumps during warm-up for jumping tests has not been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of running, static stretching of the leg extensors and practice jumps on explosive force production and jumping performance. METHODS: Sixteen volunteers (13 male and 3 female) participated in five different warm-ups in a randomised order prior to the performance of two jumping tests. The warm-ups were control, 4 min run, static stretch, run + stretch, and run + stretch + practice jumps. After a 2 min rest, a concentric jump and a drop jump were performed, which yielded 6 variables expressing fast force production and jumping performance of the leg extensor muscles (concentric jump height, peak force, rate of force developed, drop jump height, contact time and height/time). RESULTS: Generally the stretching warm-up produced the lowest values and the run or run + stretch + jumps warm-ups produced the highest values of explosive force production. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) between the control and run + stretch warm-ups, whereas the run yielded significantly better scores than the run + stretch warm-up for drop jump height (3.2%), concentric jump height (3.4%) and peak concentric force (2.7%) and rate of force developed (15.4%). CONCLUSION: The results indicated that submaximum running and practice jumps had a positive effect whereas static stretching had a negative influence on explosive force and jumping performance. It was suggested that an alternative for static stretching should be considered in warm-ups prior to power activities.
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    Now in all fairness, there are a lot of people who will argue the opposite. I'm not saying my opinion is the absolute, I'm just seeing the trend go towards an active warm-up Pre-WO.
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    I stretch my chest after each set during a workout. Back also.
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    Quote Originally Posted by James
    I stretch my chest after each set during a workout. Back also.
    by doing what exactly?
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    Good studies DieTrying Whale had some good input on this I believe, but he's not really around much anymore. Basically post workout is fine, or make sure you are warmed up first
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    I perform all my stretching PWO
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    I stretch before my workouts and also between each set.
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