Poll: Best type of Deadlift?

What type of deadlift gives best results?

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  1. What type of deadlift gives best results?


    Just wondering what type of deadlift gives people the best results... Sumo or Regular, and why?


  2. Personally, I think this is a complicated question.

    Some people prefer sumo others regular because it works for them. So, to a person who is all about high weight low reps = growth it would be whichever form allows them to lift the heaviest. To the person who is about low weight high reps gimme a burn = growth then they'll like whichever form allows them to get the biggest pump.

    I personally like the heavy weight and I take a sumo stance. It's way easier on my joints and I feel it all over my back when I can go heavy. If I go too light, I only feel it in my lower back.

  3. kwyckemynd00, how much heavier can you go on sumo deadlifts than on regular deadlifts?
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  4. i've yet to try sumo's. always done standard, might have give it a try though.

  5. Man, I've found that I can't go as heavy with sumo. A lot of people find the same thing. But I'm kinda interested in throwing them in the mix to work some different muscles. Plus I've kinda stagnated on conventional deads.

  6. I find the sumo dead works the inner thighs to a greater degree. I actually like to do high-rep sumo deads with a dumbell, as a leg exercise. For heavy deads on back day, its always traditional form for me.

    BV

  7. Conventional hit my traps and upper mid back a lot. Sumo I use my legs and hip flexors
    more. Neither is really better they both have there place depending on what u want to work out more.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by Shawn W.
    kwyckemynd00, how much heavier can you go on sumo deadlifts than on regular deadlifts?
    It really wasn't that big of a difference. I'm just able to get into a position that my body can lift the weight more comfortably in.

    It's hard to guage, too. I was bouncing when I was doing regulars because the pull strained my back too much. Now, I reset and pull for reps.

    Just give them both a shot and see which works better for you.

  9. I have a problem doing standard deads with regards to balance and whatnot, so I stick to sumo. In theory with some acclimation, anyone should lift more on sumo due to the shorter ROM and greater glute/hamstring involvement.

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  10. I'm just going for overall back thickness. My backwork consits of this, Deadlifts, Bent over Rows, Pull Ups, and seated rows. I am really tryign to pack on the thickness, since the width is easy for me to get. Any suggestions would be grateful.

  11. IMO for overall back thickness conventional deads from the floor is your best bet

  12. hell yes. Deads and bent over rows.

  13. Sumo deadlifts allow for an easier starting position for people who are either inflexible or have a big thick torso or both, but conventional deadlifts DO provide more leverage off the bottom if perfected and your body is capable of performing the lift properly

  14. Quote Originally Posted by exnihilo
    Sumo deadlifts allow for an easier starting position for people who are either inflexible or have a big thick torso or both, but conventional deadlifts DO provide more leverage off the bottom if perfected and your body is capable of performing the lift properly
    Well said. People assume that sumo is the way to go for heavy weight, but if it were that easy, guys like Garry Frank (2nd best DL ever and best PLer on the planet!) wouldn't be using conventional, right exhihilo

  15. the other week i went to a midwest powerlifting meet. all the heavier pulls were done with sumo style.

  16. Quote Originally Posted by knox
    the other week i went to a midwest powerlifting meet. all the heavier pulls were done with sumo style.
    I think it has to do w/ body structure, personally. Natural pullers prob do better w/ sumo. I don't think its "the stance" itself that works well. Although, it does decrease stroke, that's for sure...

  17. Seems to me since the sumo allows you to keep your back in more or less the same position through the lift, it works the legs more. I'd think a traditional dead would work the back much more since you must extend the back in the top half of the lift.

  18. The sumo works the hips and glutes more, and is a better way of deadlifting for thick guys with large bellies that have a hard time getting really low on the bar. I also think there is more of a carryover from squats to sumo style deadlifts... However, supposedly the mechanical leverage of the conventional pull is slightly better.

  19. You guys should try trap bar deads, much more of a natural position in the lift, plus it is much easier on the lower back. just my .02 cents......

  20. All I know, is sumo deads and squats just feel so much better. My hams and glutes get "ruined"! There is nothing that trashes my hams and glutes better than nice, slow, sumo squats.

  21. fwiw, questions like this are meaningless "best kind of deadlift"

    that's like saying "what the best workout routine?"

    the obvious corollary is "best for WHAT?"

  22. and for whom

  23. sumo squats and deads feel better on my knees

  24. Quote Originally Posted by Homerjay
    sumo squats and deads fell better on my knees
    ditto. and they beat your hamstrings and glutes like no other exercise we've conceived of

  25. i agree about trap bar deads. the closer the bar is to your base of support, the better (generally speaking). because of the shape of our bodies, it is a natural that when deadlifting the bar is well forward of where it would OPTIMALLY be for max loading, for biomechanical efficiency, and for safety.

    for those who deadlift SPECIFICALLY for competition, trap bar deads might have their place as an occasional assistance exercise, but if one is deadlifting to get strong (vs for competition) i think trap bar deads are very underrated

  26. when i used to powerlift i used to enjoy sumo style....being as tall as I am ( 5;11) I found i could get lower than regular, and lift some pretty intense weight for a girl

    Sumo all the way

  27. Anybody ever try deads with the bar behind the feet? Certainly feels different and can be helpful to those with lower back injuries that never get better. Nothing wrong with a little experimentation...most of the time anyway.

  28. I believe that would be a real "hack squat"...I'm pretty sure anyway.

  29. Quote Originally Posted by kwyckemynd00
    ditto. and they beat your hamstrings and glutes like no other exercise we've conceived of

    You sure you have tried all of the exercises out to know this for sure???

    I think I might have one that will make you WISHING you could go back to the sumo dead lift to give your hams a rest

    You kneel down with your ankles/feet pinned down to the floor with either a piece of gym equipment or someone holding them. Now slowly lower your torso to the floor til your chest touches and come back up.

    BTW you may want to have your hands ready to break your fall so you don't break your nose.

    Give em a try and come back and let us know how many you can do

  30. Hmm....sounds interesting I'll give these a shot one day...however, I have to admit...I'm afraid...yep....if they're "that bad" it's scary to me

  31. I will be honest I can barely perform a couple reps and I kinda cheat on them lol

  32. I just feel a lot more comfortable pulling from the sumo position. I do both ways just for practice and to hit the different muscles, but when it comes down to my serious heavy lift I always go with the sumo.

  33. If you're trying to increase your deadlift, then as Louie Simmons says, "do everything but deadlift". Sounds strange but I've found good mornings, box squats, and hypers to really build a strong deadlift.

    For back thickness you should also throw in some GMs. Just my humble opinion.

  34. I find that conventional deads work the upper and lower back more, while sumo hits the glutes and hams more. I do both, though I only go really heavy with sumo style deadlifts as I have had some back pain issues after super heavy convetional deads.

    I think some sort of deadlifting should be done every week, whether speed pulls, pulls off a platform, or something. I wouldn't go heavy on deadlifts every week though, that taxes the nervous system in an extreme way.

  35. Quote Originally Posted by exnihilo
    I wouldn't go heavy on deadlifts every week though, that taxes the nervous system in an extreme way.
    I'm guessing you mean don't do a 1 rep max every week. Are you talking even a 3RM?

    PL definition of "heavy" can be different from the BB definition.

  36. Deadlifts themselves are very taxing on the CNS whether your going for reps or maxing out. I wouldn't recommend doing them every week as it may lead to overtraining.

  37. Going heavy for me is 3rm or heavier. I Agree with IRserge that you should be careful not to overdo deadlifts, however some variant (whether speed pulls, sumo pulls, conventional pulls on a platform, etc) should be done every week, probably alternating between a 1rm, doing 3-5 sets of 3 reps with a 5rm weight, and doing 8-10 singles with a 5-6rm weight but done as explosively as possible.

  38. Quote Originally Posted by exnihilo
    Going heavy for me is 3rm or heavier. I Agree with IRserge that you should be careful not to overdo deadlifts, however some variant (whether speed pulls, sumo pulls, conventional pulls on a platform, etc) should be done every week, probably alternating between a 1rm, doing 3-5 sets of 3 reps with a 5rm weight, and doing 8-10 singles with a 5-6rm weight but done as explosively as possible.
    Thanks for clarifying that. Those are some good ways to mix things up so the CNS isn't overtaxed.

  39. I have recently turned to rack deadlifts for my back thickness. They work great, and doesn't give my lower back/legs the burn I didn't want since I'm hitting it on back day.

  40. Quote Originally Posted by BOHICA
    I have recently turned to rack deadlifts for my back thickness. They work great, and doesn't give my lower back/legs the burn I didn't want since I'm hitting it on back day.
    Try spacing your grip WAY WAY out when you do your rack pulls too. That seems to involve the back a lot more.
  

  
 

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