Poll: Best type of Deadlift?

What type of deadlift gives best results?

Page 2 of 2 First 12
  1. Cutting Sucks!
    Ant.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Age
    29
    Posts
    116
    Rep Power
    179
    Level
    10
    Lv. Percent
    4.64%

    I was reading the thread and I was going to suggest rack pulls but it looks like you figured it out on your own. Those are fun. I got up to 680 from just above my knee last week. Also, cleans or clean pulls seem to be good for upper back thickness. As for deadlifts, I think exnihilo hit the nail on the head when he said conventional involves more low and upper back while sumo is glutes and hammies. I havent tried moving my grip out but im gonna give that a shot. Seems like it would give the traps hell.

  2. Advanced Member
    -2z-'s Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  190 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Age
    43
    Posts
    736
    Rep Power
    500
    Level
    21
    Lv. Percent
    87.82%

    Quote Originally Posted by glenihan
    IMO for overall back thickness conventional deads from the floor is your best bet
    I agree.
  3. Banned
    Vincent124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Age
    44
    Posts
    38
    Rep Power
    0
    Level
    5
    Lv. Percent
    57.32%

    Good mornings > any deadlift.
    •   
       

  4. Elite Member
    BigVrunga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Age
    38
    Posts
    5,063
    Rep Power
    2683
    Level
    49
    Lv. Percent
    26.63%
    Achievements Posting ProPosting Authority

    I dont know about that...they work different muscle groups.
  5. Elite Member
    bioman's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  180 lbs.
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    42
    Posts
    7,700
    Rep Power
    513134
    Level
    59
    Lv. Percent
    85.37%
    Achievements Reputation ProReputation AuthorityPosting ProPosting Authority

    I give props to trap bar deads as well. They seem to hit me all over and I can pause more effectively at the top of the lift and get my posture/form just right. I can go a lot heavier and slower on them with more confidence than standard or sumo deads.

    I'm a bit on the slower recovery end of things so at most I'll alternate squats on week one, leg presses on week two, and deads on week three...then repeat. On cycle I'll add leg presses to squat day and alternate squats and deads each week. .since I'm in superman mode. lol
  6. Registered User
    rake922's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    76
    Rep Power
    139
    Level
    7
    Lv. Percent
    87.38%

    Regular deadlift
  7. Registered User
    CRUNCH's Avatar
    Stats
    6'3"  252 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Age
    44
    Posts
    1,168
    Rep Power
    714
    Level
    26
    Lv. Percent
    27.87%
    Achievements Posting Pro

    Back in my glory days of strongman comps, we'd have different events from one comp to another. Some had full deads, some partials (18" or silver dollar deads). Found I could pull more from the ground with conventional and more from 18" with sumo.

    Conventional deads work best for me. I'm 6'3" with long legs and arms so I agree with what others have said about individual body structure being the best indicator of which type of dead is best for them.
  8. Binging on Pure ****ing Rage
    Mulletsoldier's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  215 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    12,226
    Rep Power
    27064
    Level
    67
    Lv. Percent
    41%
    Achievements Reputation ProPosting ProPosting AuthorityPosting Veteran

    Personally I like the Rack.
  9. Advanced Member
    BigCasino's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  223 lbs.
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Age
    29
    Posts
    581
    Rep Power
    417
    Level
    19
    Lv. Percent
    68.59%

    Each week I alternate regular stance deadlifts and rack deadlifts. Ever since I started implementing rack dead I have noticed quicker strength gains.
  10. New Member
    alan aragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Age
    42
    Posts
    232
    Rep Power
    237
    Level
    12
    Lv. Percent
    82.08%

    A THREE DIMENSIONAL KINETIC ANALYSIS OF SUMO AND CONVENTIONAL STYLE DEADLIFTS

    "SUMMARY: Mechanical work is greater in the conventional deadlift, which suggest a higher energy expenditure. Moderate to high hip extensor, knee extensor, and ankle dorsiflexor moments are generated during the sumo deadlift, which implies moderate to high muscle activity is needed from the hip extensors, knee extensors, and ankle dorsi flexors. In contrast, moderate to high hip extensor moments and low knee flexor, knee extensor, and ankle plantar flexor moments are generated during the conventional deadlift. This implies moderate to high muscle activity from the hip extensors, and lower activity from the knee flexors & extensors and ankle plantar flexors. These kinetic differences result from technique differences. Hence, a electromyographic analysis should now be conducted to confirm muscle activity patterns. This would help trainers and therapists in prescribing the appropriate deadlift technique."

    [and now for an EMG study...]

    An electromyographic analysis of sumo and conventional style deadlifts.

    "RESULTS: Overall EMG activity from the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior were significantly greater in the sumo deadlift, whereas overall EMG activity from the medial gastrocnemius was significantly greater in the conventional deadlift. Compared with the no-belt condition, the belt condition produced significantly greater rectus abdominis activity and significantly less external oblique activity. For most muscles, EMG activity was significantly greater in the knee extending intervals compared with the corresponding knee flexing intervals."
  11. Registered User
    CRUNCH's Avatar
    Stats
    6'3"  252 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Age
    44
    Posts
    1,168
    Rep Power
    714
    Level
    26
    Lv. Percent
    27.87%
    Achievements Posting Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by alan aragon
    A THREE DIMENSIONAL KINETIC ANALYSIS OF SUMO AND CONVENTIONAL STYLE DEADLIFTS

    "SUMMARY: Mechanical work is greater in the conventional deadlift, which suggest a higher energy expenditure. Moderate to high hip extensor, knee extensor, and ankle dorsiflexor moments are generated during the sumo deadlift, which implies moderate to high muscle activity is needed from the hip extensors, knee extensors, and ankle dorsi flexors. In contrast, moderate to high hip extensor moments and low knee flexor, knee extensor, and ankle plantar flexor moments are generated during the conventional deadlift. This implies moderate to high muscle activity from the hip extensors, and lower activity from the knee flexors & extensors and ankle plantar flexors. These kinetic differences result from technique differences. Hence, a electromyographic analysis should now be conducted to confirm muscle activity patterns. This would help trainers and therapists in prescribing the appropriate deadlift technique."

    [and now for an EMG study...]

    An electromyographic analysis of sumo and conventional style deadlifts.

    "RESULTS: Overall EMG activity from the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior were significantly greater in the sumo deadlift, whereas overall EMG activity from the medial gastrocnemius was significantly greater in the conventional deadlift. Compared with the no-belt condition, the belt condition produced significantly greater rectus abdominis activity and significantly less external oblique activity. For most muscles, EMG activity was significantly greater in the knee extending intervals compared with the corresponding knee flexing intervals."
    Interesting stuff allan, thanks for posting that.

    Funny though, I don't think tibialis anterior or medial gastroc activity (or lack of) will be a primary factor in determining which type of DL I do! The rest was cool, researchers can just be a tad goofy sometimes.
  12. New Member
    alan aragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Age
    42
    Posts
    232
    Rep Power
    237
    Level
    12
    Lv. Percent
    82.08%

    Quote Originally Posted by CRUNCH
    Interesting stuff allan, thanks for posting that.

    Funny though, I don't think tibialis anterior or medial gastroc activity (or lack of) will be a primary factor in determining which type of DL I do! The rest was cool, researchers can just be a tad goofy sometimes.
    Hahaha goofy? I doubt the researchers have set foot in the weight room . But yeah, they do come up with some interesting lab data.
  13. Registered User
    CHAPS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Age
    28
    Posts
    4,380
    Rep Power
    2868
    Level
    45
    Lv. Percent
    54.82%
    Achievements Reputation ProPosting Pro

    Sumo's involve too much leg for my liking, unless i was to use them on a leg day.
  14. New Member
    MiKeY ReSp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    257
    Rep Power
    234
    Level
    13
    Lv. Percent
    69.41%

    Never even really tried sumo's, always did them regular stance, but I'm going to give them a shot next week and I'll see how they feel. Quick question for you guys though...When I deadlift, I always pull it from the floor, and let it come back to the floor to a complete stop before I pull the next rep. Lately in my gym I've seen a lot of people stop right before they touch the floor, I guess you can say they "barely graze" the floor with the weight before pulling back up. Is there any advantage or disadvantage to doing this?? How do you guys do them?
  15. Advanced Member
    BigCasino's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  223 lbs.
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Age
    29
    Posts
    581
    Rep Power
    417
    Level
    19
    Lv. Percent
    68.59%

    Quote Originally Posted by MiKeY ReSp View Post
    Never even really tried sumo's, always did them regular stance, but I'm going to give them a shot next week and I'll see how they feel. Quick question for you guys though...When I deadlift, I always pull it from the floor, and let it come back to the floor to a complete stop before I pull the next rep. Lately in my gym I've seen a lot of people stop right before they touch the floor, I guess you can say they "barely graze" the floor with the weight before pulling back up. Is there any advantage or disadvantage to doing this?? How do you guys do them?
    I barely let them graze the floor, and never fully set it down. I feel that this is more difficult, because when you set it down you body has a moment of rest. By not setting it on the ground, you are keeping constant tension on your muscles. I'm not sure if it really makes a difference in terms of strength / muscle gains, but I do feel it is more challenging.
  16. Diamond Member
    John Smeton's Avatar
    Stats
    6'2"  225 lbs.
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Age
    33
    Posts
    10,014
    Rep Power
    33558
    Level
    62
    Lv. Percent
    81.81%
    Achievements Reputation ProPosting ProPosting AuthorityPosting Veteran

    nice thread
    Follow me on facebook, twitter and youtube, where I share information and videos to help you achieve your physique goals, John Smeton Ftness
  17. New Member
    MEH89's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    293
    Rep Power
    376
    Level
    14
    Lv. Percent
    89.54%
    Achievements Reputation Pro

    I think it depends on your natural body leverages that determine which you can lift heavier at. The sumo deadlift is more hips, and poster chain. well the conventional deadlift works more lower back, and less hips. They both use the lower, and upper back, but the sumo is more legs. I would go with conventional if your are just interested in getting bigger, the sumo dosent work know where near as much back, and it will make your hips sore as ****. If your not a powerlifter, and looking to get the most weight, I would go with conventional. The reason being if your not competing then I wouldnt push make back to its limit, youll just have a sore back.Mark
  18. New Member
    MEH89's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    293
    Rep Power
    376
    Level
    14
    Lv. Percent
    89.54%
    Achievements Reputation Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by BigCasino View Post
    I barely let them graze the floor, and never fully set it down. I feel that this is more difficult, because when you set it down you body has a moment of rest. By not setting it on the ground, you are keeping constant tension on your muscles. I'm not sure if it really makes a difference in terms of strength / muscle gains, but I do feel it is more challenging.
    Its more challenging to let it rest, than it just hitting the ground "barley" then pulling. Just like benchpressing its harder if you pause it. Youll proably think its harder to bounce them for becuase as soon as the weight touches the ground you try to be explosive, and pull. Then you get bent over, and the bar is away from your body putting, you at a leverage disadvantage, more stress on the lower back the futher the bar is from the body.Maybe your body is deferent on terms of body strengths, and weakness. but for me its harder to let them rest. Mark
  19. New Member
    btech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    51
    Rep Power
    112
    Level
    6
    Lv. Percent
    53.94%

    For me, I have noticed that alternating floor deadlifts with rack deadlifts each week helps bump up my overall deadlift.....anybody else?
  20. Board Sponsor
    Aggravated's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,746
    Rep Power
    1501
    Level
    37
    Lv. Percent
    50.93%
    Achievements Posting Pro

    Why has no one mentioned stiff legged deads? These things hit my hams harder than sumo style.
  21. Registered User
    BOHICA's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  222 lbs.
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,196
    Rep Power
    721
    Level
    28
    Lv. Percent
    9.46%
    Achievements Posting Pro

    Because deadlift's are majority of a back exercise/full body exercise. Stiff leg deadlifts aren't the same thing.
  22. Diamond Member
    John Smeton's Avatar
    Stats
    6'2"  225 lbs.
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Age
    33
    Posts
    10,014
    Rep Power
    33558
    Level
    62
    Lv. Percent
    81.81%
    Achievements Reputation ProPosting ProPosting AuthorityPosting Veteran

    Stiffs are for Hams; allthough I feel my rhomboids and maybe rear delts when I do these.

    I do the sldl version almost strait legged, knee's bent some, and butt out, butt out allows a great stretch in the hams.
    Follow me on facebook, twitter and youtube, where I share information and videos to help you achieve your physique goals, John Smeton Ftness
  23. Senior Member
    kabuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,202
    Rep Power
    31511
    Level
    34
    Lv. Percent
    54.49%
    Achievements Reputation ProPosting Pro

    Conventional Deadlifters need to pull sumo as well. -- Sumo offers superior hip and posterior chain development.

    Sumo Deadlifters need to pull Conventional as well. -- Conventional offers superior lower back development.

    Both need to be cycled into a serious deadlifters program throughout the year.

    I also agree with getting a bigger deadlift by not deadlifting...but only for the elite deadlifter. Most newer trainees or non competitive deadlifters are NOT going to benifit from not doing the deadlift.
    1010 Squat @ 220 (#1 ranking in world) 801 Dead @ 198 (#1 ranking in world)
    Sponsored by USPLabs
    Live Your DREAMS -> WWW . KABUKIWARRIOR . COM
  24. Senior Member
    asianbabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Age
    28
    Posts
    1,616
    Rep Power
    1808
    Level
    29
    Lv. Percent
    58.94%
    Achievements Reputation ProPosting Pro

    I only do sumo stance deadlifts. I believe it targets the booty a bit more and it is a more comfortable position for me.
  

  
 

Similar Forum Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-28-2013, 12:57 AM
  2. What types of tests do insurance cover?
    By mauibuilt in forum General Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-31-2009, 09:17 PM
  3. What type of creatine is best?
    By testotony in forum Supplements
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-18-2008, 12:48 PM
  4. Ughh.... What type of Cardio/Lifting program for me??
    By foreverdown92 in forum Exercise Science
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-24-2005, 10:58 PM
  5. What type of oil, does it matter?
    By bpdaddy in forum Anabolics
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-11-2004, 02:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in