The Meaning of Legs - Read this it's short and sweet. - AnabolicMinds.com

The Meaning of Legs - Read this it's short and sweet.

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    The Meaning of Legs - Read this it's short and sweet.


    THE MEANING OF LEGS

    Your leg development is a direct reflection of your character. Weak legs mean a weak will. Show me a man whose upper body is proportionately bigger than his lower body and I'll show you a man who will settle for mediocre success in all walks of life. Never will he win a championship. Deficient legs are a sign that he cannot take the strain of a leg workout that would be of maximum benefit, because a good leg workout bears no resemblance to a good workout for any other body part.




    How true is that. How true is that????
    Last edited by Deoudes59; 01-30-2005 at 11:10 PM.
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    spot on!
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    That's great!
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    legs are great, best place to stack muscle, burn those extra calories and make your mid-section look leaner
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    true true, I look ~210ish, but the added leg muscle sticks me at 220lbs+
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    Printed to read before my leg workout.
  7. USA HOCKEY
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    from the depths of the board...

    bumping this, for all to read and reread and reflect and react
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    Quote Originally Posted by CEDeoudes59
    THE MEANING OF LEGS

    Your leg development is a direct reflection of your character. Weak legs mean a weak will. Show me a man whose upper body is proportionately bigger than his lower body and I'll show you a man who will settle for mediocre success in all walks of life. Never will he win a championship. Deficient legs are a sign that he cannot take the strain of a leg workout that would be of maximum benefit, because a good leg workout bears no resemblance to a good workout for any other body part.




    How true is that. How true is that????

    You speak the truth.
  9. USA HOCKEY
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    awesome writeup, but it wasn't by me!
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    I conccur
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    The ones who dont work legs hard are either wimps or ego seekers. When someone says "flex", I dont see too many quads, and you never hear a girl say "look at those hamstrings"
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    The only time I have gotten a compliment on my legs was when some girl was wrestling with me and she grabbed my legs (well hammys). She was like omg, your legs are hard! I was like...well DUH!

    (I guess thats kinda a compliment)
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    Word.

    Ry - the next line should have been "Oh yeah? I'll show you hard!"
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    ahha! i should have. She was cute too!
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    Yea I love legs and hate them, its kind of the same thing with deadlifts. It feels good to be lifting the heavy weights and that first set or 2 feels good. But by the 3-4, it just takes everything you got to get it out and usually ends up with me feeling a little sick from it.
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    Ok, that paragraph made me cry.

    lol, jk. I've lost a lot of size on my legs lately..very frustrating.

    I just did my first heavy leg WO after a 3 month lay-off due to a lumbar injury. It's good to be back!
  17. USA HOCKEY
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    Quote Originally Posted by spatch
    The ones who dont work legs hard are either wimps or ego seekers. When someone says "flex", I dont see too many quads, and you never hear a girl say "look at those hamstrings"
    so true, even if you aren't a bodybuilder, you still have to work legs. you're not an athlete if you don't work legs. hell, you're not a man if you don't*

    * not counting injuries.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CEDeoudes59
    so true, even if you aren't a bodybuilder, you still have to work legs. you're not an athlete if you don't work legs. hell, you're not a man if you don't*

    * not counting injuries.
    Or a woman for that matter. Work those legs hard ladies. Great post!
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    Pretty sweet, where did you find this?
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    I read that everone should do atleast 50 squats a day, non weighted on nonlifting days. It is suppossed to be really good for your internals cause it makes the blood flow better in your upper torso. I will try to find it and post it here.
    Drew
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    not true.
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    legs is the one area where "no pain no gain" truly applies
  23. USA HOCKEY
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    Quote Originally Posted by revodrew
    I read that everone should do atleast 50 squats a day, non weighted on nonlifting days. It is suppossed to be really good for your internals cause it makes the blood flow better in your upper torso. I will try to find it and post it here.
    Drew
    haha, that's overtraining if i had to guess
    arnold's father supposedly made him and his brother do 2 sets of squats everyday or they wouldn't get breakfast
    maybe true but maybe not
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    Quote Originally Posted by revodrew
    I read that everone should do atleast 50 squats a day, non weighted on nonlifting days. It is suppossed to be really good for your internals cause it makes the blood flow better in your upper torso. I will try to find it and post it here.
    Drew
    used to do the matt furey workout.
    had worked my way up to 1000 'hindu squats' at a time.
    did wonders for endurance and knee and ankle pain.
    however did zero for mass and fat burning.
    also, after a time it got boring as hell spending an hour doing 'hindu sqauts'.
    YMMV
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    Fantastic truth.
  26. Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boss_K
    not true.
    Show me your sources so I can compare against mine.
    Thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boss_K
    not true.
    Unless you have something that strongly arguees this, I will believe the Doc over you.

    Fear the Squat No More! Part I

    By Paul Chek, HHP, NMT
    Founder, C.H.E.K. Institute

    While most articles written about the squat are aimed at the sweat-covered "big boys" in the gym, or at athletes trying to improve their performance, I'll show you that anyone, with at least one good leg, can use the squat to achieve improved health and function. I will teach you why we must learn to cherish and use the squat exercise, and how to perform several variations for excellent results.
    In the elite circles of strength sports, the squat exercise has long been referred to as "The King of All Exercises." Many respectable strength and conditioning experts feel if they had to choose only one exercise to condition an athlete, the squat would provide the greatest overall benefit.
    This is because the squat is a free-body movement that requires use of every muscle in the body. Given enough load and/or intensity even small muscles in the face will contract.
    Although the squat has been considered a keystone exercise for as long as people have been writing about strengthening and conditioning, it's beginning to show serious signs of becoming extinct. Having traveled and lectured all over the world for many years, I've been in a fair share of gyms and it is astonishing to me how few people are squatting anymore. It has come to the point that even finding a squat cage in a gym is difficult because they are being replaced with the shiniest new machine!
    Squatting is a Primal Pattern
    As developmental beings, the majority of our activities were ground-based activities that demanded physical readiness and the ability to get down to the ground easily. As I discuss in my book, "Movement That Matters," there are seven specific movements that we would have to be able to perform in order to ensure our survival during that era. I call these seven basic movements the Primal Patterns™ and they are:
    • Squatting
    • Lunging
    • Bending
    • Pushing
    • Pulling
    • Twisting
    • Gait (walking, jogging and running)
    Until very recently, we lived in harmony with nature and involved ourselves in hunting, gathering (see Figure 1), building shelter (see Figure 2), tending to crops (in the recent 10,000 years) and using fire to make tools and keep warm. The squat pattern was crucial for survival and, I believe, just as important today as it was then.
    The Physiological Importance of the Squat
    Digestion and Elimination
    Most of you don't think of the squat exercise as being beneficial to digestion and elimination. However, I would like to point out a few unique anatomical features of the human being in this regard. First of all, human beings are the only animals who must push feces uphill.
    In our natural environment, where we were squatting repeatedly throughout the day as dictated by a ground-based living environment, this was not a problem because of our anatomical design. Whenever we squatted to work, socialize or defecate, we would naturally squat until our hands reached the ground, (since that's where everything was) or until our torso was fully relaxed and supported by our thighs (see Figure 3).
    The full squat results in compression in the lower abdomen from the thigh. The right thigh will compress the cecum (the origin of the colon), mechanically pushing the feces uphill into the transverse colon, while the left thigh compresses the descending colon, moving feces into the sigmoid colon and ultimately the rectum (see Figure 4).
    With this understanding in mind, it is not surprising many early naturopathic physicians attributed the massive increase in constipation in the late 1800s and early 1900s to Thomas Crapper who has often been mistakenly identified as the inventor of the modern seated toilet. He was actually a plumber who popularized the toilet, but didn't invent it. To combat the fact that the modern toilet doesn't require a full squat, and therefore doesn't facilitate evacuation of the colon, Colon Hygienists recommend the use of a footstool ranging from 6-14 inches in height.[1]
    The addition of the full squat to your exercise program, along with a footstool can dramatically improve digestion and elimination. The reason I say "digestion" and elimination is that when the body is chronically constipated, the entire system gets backed up, literally from stomach to anus. When this happens, the stomach is forced to hold onto its contents, often leading to reflux, heartburn and poor digestion.
    Digestion and elimination are further facilitated by the full squat as a result of both pressure changes in the abdominal and thoracic cavities and improved motility of organs. Whenever you repeatedly perform the full squat, a pressure wave is created by the thighs, compressing the abdominal viscera. Additional pressure waves are created by the action of the abdominal muscles as they contract to stabilize your body, and by the action of the diaphragm as you breathe.
    These pressure waves, coupled with the mechanical action of the thighs, literally mobilize the viscera. They also pump blood and lymphatic fluids as well as mechanically aiding the intestinal system.
    By using "Breathing Squats" (see Figure 5), you can also facilitate the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). The PNS is also called the anabolic or digestive nervous system because it regulates these activities. Implementing PNS stimulating activities like breathing squats is probably more important today than ever, due to the typical American diet and lifestyle.
    It is not only stressful to the body, it also encourages activation of the sympathetic (catabolic) nervous system, which is the functional antagonist to the PNS. Too much SNS activity results in poor recovery from exercise, poor digestion and poor elimination! Try some breathing squats today.
    Many athletic types, Type-A personalities and those who cannot relax or calm their mind will very likely find breathing squats to be a valuable addition to their daily routine. To get the most from your breathing squats, make sure you go as low into the squat as you can without any discomfort, fully exhale on the way down and pause briefly at the bottom.
    To keep your mind from wandering, simply focus on counting your breaths. Keep the effort low and the movement slow. The most common mistake is to try and make it too athletic which defeats the purpose.
    One way to make sure you do your breathing squats correctly and get the most benefit is to do them right after eating or after drinking two glasses of water. If you are doing them correctly, you will not feel uncomfortable with a full stomach. In fact, as I show you in my book, "How to Eat, Move and Be Healthy!," squatting can actually improve your digestion and overall physiology.
    I recommend that you commit to performing at least 50 breathing squats a day. If you are unable to do 50 in a row then do as many as you can. Then, at intervals throughout the day, do a set of 10. This is an effective way to energize the body and combat the effects of sitting, which is an activity that the body is not designed for and is stressful to the lower back. Many of you will find that as you get better at breathing squats, your flexibility, digestion, elimination, energy, appearance, concentration and mental clarity all improve.
    Spinal Health
    The discs of our spine have no direct blood supply. They receive their nourishment and fluids through a process called "imbibition." This is a process whereby the jelly-like structure of the nucleus and collagenous outer rings of the anulus absorb fluids from the porous bone of the vertebra. The process of nourishing the spinal discs is improved by movement, which results in pressure changes in the disc tissues.
    During our developmental years, we didn't have chairs. If we wanted to stop and socialize, we simply went into a full squat and rested our trunk on our thighs[2] (see Figure 3). This process, along with our sleeping postures, naturally facilitates rehydration of the spinal discs (see Figure 6). Today, most people have such a poor diet and exercise program that performing a loaded squat places them at risk of ligament or disc injury, which has led to most exercise and rehabilitation professionals teaching maintenance of lumbar lordosis (curve) during a squat.
    Unfortunately, while the lordotic squatting posture may be beneficial among the injured and for those training at more than 60 percent maximum intensity (~ 21 rep load), use of the lordotic posture when it is unnecessary, such as during light squatting or during functional activities, results in static loading.
    This reduces pumping and accelerates the rate at which you dehydrate your disks, shortening your spine (see Figure 7). When the spine shortens due to disc dehydration and desiccation, the spinal ligaments become progressively more lax (see Figure 7-A), encouraging spinal instability. Surely, what we need is to use the natural full squat at low intensities in the gym, or during activities of daily living where the load is not threatening to the spine.
    I recommend to my patients that they use a natural full squat if the load is light enough to comfortably lift more than 20 times or light enough they can easily breath naturally. However, they must have no orthopedic restrictions, such as an existing disc bulge.

    Drew
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    Nobody? Not trying to argue, just find the truth. I will check back later.
    Drew
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    I'm disagreeing with the first post. I don't think legs should be the only measure of ones character. It is an opinion. I don't need a study to back it up....
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    Wow I really liked this post, glad you bumped it up man!
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    GREAT SECOND POST!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boss_K
    I'm disagreeing with the first post. I don't think legs should be the only measure of ones character. It is an opinion. I don't need a study to back it up....
    Oh, got ya, I thought you were saying that squats everyday were not true. Sorry man. Didnt mean to sound like I was trying to Down you or anything, I just try to learn from experiance rather then what some doc. says who probally never lifted a weight or practice what he preaches. In this case I do have to side with him as there is nothing going against it.
    Drew
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    On another note, "intense leg training" comes in several colors.

    My friend thought I was a ***** because I hardly every squat, but he did one of my workouts with me and he could hardly walk to his car

    secret: Hack Squats with 5 second negatives
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    Quote Originally Posted by spatch
    On another note, "intense leg training" comes in several colors.

    My friend thought I was a ***** because I hardly every squat, but he did one of my workouts with me and he could hardly walk to his car

    secret: Hack Squats with 5 second negatives
    Hack squats with long negatives are brutal. Just make sure you breathe correctly on those puppies. I was doing drop sets with hack squats and doing long 5-6 second negatives and taking a plate off every 5 reps and didnt time my breathing right. I ended up collapsing and when I stood up I had the worst godawful headache of my life for like 10 mins. I thought I was seriously having an aneurysm. For 2 weeks after that everytime I tried to lift the pain came back in the back of my head, and it was horrible. The doc said i probably pulled a muscle in my neck or trap, but it felt like I busted a blood vessel in the back of my head. Needless to say now I make sure I breathe extra deep when doing leg movements.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbxdan
    Hack squats with long negatives are brutal. Just make sure you breathe correctly on those puppies. I was doing drop sets with hack squats and doing long 5-6 second negatives and taking a plate off every 5 reps and didnt time my breathing right. I ended up collapsing and when I stood up I had the worst godawful headache of my life for like 10 mins. I thought I was seriously having an aneurysm. For 2 weeks after that everytime I tried to lift the pain came back in the back of my head, and it was horrible. The doc said i probably pulled a muscle in my neck or trap, but it felt like I busted a blood vessel in the back of my head. Needless to say now I make sure I breathe extra deep when doing leg movements.
    It is a blood vessel in the back of your head. I had the same thing happen to me when I increased my bench too fast. You are suppose to take it easy for a while and if the pain comes back ease off. I can’t give you any sources my experience was about 4 years ago and I read extensively about it on bb.com and other internet sources.
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    Quote Originally Posted by badbart
    It is a blood vessel in the back of your head. I had the same thing happen to me when I increased my bench too fast. You are suppose to take it easy for a while and if the pain comes back ease off. I can’t give you any sources my experience was about 4 years ago and I read extensively about it on bb.com and other internet sources.
    Yeah, after I went back to the doc that's what he said. They found some leekage in a small arachnoid cyst that a cat-scan revealed. Pretty bad pain isn't it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbxdan
    Hack squats with long negatives are brutal. Just make sure you breathe correctly on those puppies. I was doing drop sets with hack squats and doing long 5-6 second negatives and taking a plate off every 5 reps and didnt time my breathing right. I ended up collapsing and when I stood up I had the worst godawful headache of my life for like 10 mins. I thought I was seriously having an aneurysm. For 2 weeks after that everytime I tried to lift the pain came back in the back of my head, and it was horrible. The doc said i probably pulled a muscle in my neck or trap, but it felt like I busted a blood vessel in the back of my head. Needless to say now I make sure I breathe extra deep when doing leg movements.
    I had the same exact thing about a year ago when doing a triple on squats.. Won't ever go below 5 reps on any exercise now. Worst pain of my life.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Togoro
    Wow I really liked this post, glad you bumped it up man!

    Anyone know why I was neg repped for saying that I liked this post??

    Any input would be appreciated.
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    Perfect post it seperates the men form the boys squats kick ass below parallel!!!! <----then you can do stuff like that!
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    So out of curiousoty how big are everyone's legs? I'll start off thighs 28" and calves 18.5" for reference I weigh 234 lbs with about 12-13% bf. Oh yeah I am 5-11.
  

  
 

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