13 Year old and weightlifting

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    13 Year old and weightlifting


    My 2 training partners are my 16 and 17 yo sons. Now my 13 year old wants to get in the act!
    He is a little guy, unlike his brothers. I decided to try and train him and set him up with a simple program:

    Benches 1x10-65lbs
    Lat Pulls 1x10-35
    Barbell Milis 1x10-45
    Tcep Pushes 1x10-12.5
    DB Curls 1x10-10

    These are the weights he can handle without much struggle and in that order. He has done this WO 2 x this week.

    Am I wrong in trying this? Is there a possibilty this could have some ill effect on him?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EEmain
    My 2 training partners are my 16 and 17 yo sons. Now my 13 year old wants to get in the act!
    He is a little guy, unlike his brothers. I decided to try and train him and set him up with a simple program:

    Benches 1x10-65lbs
    Lat Pulls 1x10-35
    Barbell Milis 1x10-45
    Tcep Pushes 1x10-12.5
    DB Curls 1x10-10

    These are the weights he can handle without much struggle and in that order. He has done this WO 2 x this week.

    Am I wrong in trying this? Is there a possibilty this could have some ill effect on him?
    I've always heard stick to calestinics at that age such as push-ups, pull-ups, crunches etc. Stuff that involves your own bodyweight you know. I never really looked that much into it though seeing as I didn't start lifting until I was 17. I have known a few guys that started lifting at a young age and they always seem to be short. Not sure it if has some sort of effect on your growth platlets or not.
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    natedogg, I have heard the same information , I dont see how it could have a negative effect. If it was me I would do exactly what you are doing and train light to start with.
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    I personall (keep in mind, I'm only 21!!) disagree that it's a big deal to have young teens working out. At 13-14, I think it's quite alright to lift weights. A simple 2 days split may work wonders for him. However, this is just my opinion. Kids are usually ready by the around the time they hit highschool, especially if they are going to be athletes. Maybe something like this:

    Day One:

    Dips or Bench Press 2 x 6-8
    Incline Press, or incline Fly 2 x 10-12
    Military Press, Or Hammer Shoulder Press 2 x 6-8
    Tricep (skull crushers) Extensions or Tricep Pushdowns 2 x 10-12
    Heavy Abs 3 x 10

    Day Two:
    Pull-Up 3 sets to failure
    Barbell Row 2 x 8
    EZ-Bar Or Dumbell Curl 1 x 10
    Squats 2 x 10
    Deadlifts, or Stiff-Legged Deadlift 1 x 10

    (simple routine by Iron Addict)

    Deads and squats only if you can teach proper form to him!!

    It just seemed that your orginal routine never touched his legs and back, and legs/back are important.
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    kwy, thats what i was implying a simple routine. I do agree though keep it simple.
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    Quote Originally Posted by punta
    kwy, thats what i was implying a simple routine. I do agree though keep it simple.
    Simple always seems to be effective. Funny how that works, huh?
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    I've heard that squatting/deadlifting in early teens can stop you growing in height and prevent some of the bones in your back from joining together as they are supposed to - again this is only word of mouth - I've never read a study to back it up.
    I just know if it was my kid I wouldn't take any chances.
    I agree with natedogg - I got relatively strong and fit in my early teens from doing loads of pushups, situps and chin-ups. As for leg strength - sprint training and running up hills is good for strength. I suppose some bicep curls wouldnt hurt either.
    Just my opinion.
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    Thanks guys! I will do some research and see if any studies have been done.Can`t really even be sure if the child will stick with it or if it is a passing phase.
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    great idea


    i think it's a great idea.. I wish my dad would have been into working out and gotten me started that early. I'd always have a partner. I don't see any reason why not to. It's also a good way to share a hobbie with your kids.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EEmain
    Thanks guys! I will do some research and see if any studies have been done.Can`t really even be sure if the child will stick with it or if it is a passing phase.
    I think one of the main issues is making sure the growth plates are stabalized..
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    i started lifting around that age .. of course it was kinda sporatic, poor training strategy and with a diet that mainly consisted of sugar ... but i think its a great idea and i don't buy that it will stunt one's growth it doesn't make any sense to me
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    yep younger the better...
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    13 y/o is a great age to start getting into lifting weights, I wish I had the opportunity!! If you're going to start him lifting, I would HIGHLY suggest keeping the reps higher than 15/set, when you lower the reps and increase the weights on somebody who still has some growing to do, you take the risk of avulsing the growth plates, and cause bone abnormalities at where the tendons attach to the muscle. For a kid his age, I like I said I would suggest keeping the reps high, and FOCUS on developing FORM and proper mechanics. I believe as long as you keep the reps high, you can pretty much do any exercises you desire...Good idea would be developing good form in the main olympic lifts and preparing him for HS athletics. Also stretching should be a BIG focus, especially if the gets real serious about lifting

    Hope that helps!
    CK
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    the good ol growth plate.. oh man........ there are to many that started lifing at a really young age that grew just fine... what is the deal with this....
    your body is growing and adaptiong.... lou feriggno started lifting at like 13 and he went as heavy as he could and grew to 6"4' just fine arnold started at 15 and grew to 6"2'
    Dave drapper.... the list goes on and on.... look he has really short arms
    he must of did heavy bench when he was young before he stopped growing..
    ........ I dont think so.... " but ,yes Form is important that is very true"...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwil
    i think it's a great idea.. I wish my dad would have been into working out and gotten me started that early. I'd always have a partner. I don't see any reason why not to. It's also a good way to share a hobbie with your kids.
    Yes it is pure fun working out with my sons..
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    Latest research is showing that it is prefectly fine to start lifting at this age and might even strength bone not cause you to stop growing
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    Athanasios G. Dessypris

    School of Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    ABSTRACT

    Tsolakis, C.K., G.K. Vagenas, and A.G. Dessypris. Strength adaptations and hormonal responses to resistance training and detraining in preadolescent males. J. Strength Cond. Res. 18(3):625–629. 2004.—Ninteen untrained preadolescent males (11–13 years old) were randomly placed into an experimental trained group (STG, n = 9) and a control group (n = 10). Informed consent was obtained from the children and their parents. The STG was submitted to a 2-month resistance-training program (6 exercises, 3 × 10 repetitions maximum [RM], 3 times per week), followed by a 2-month detraining program. The effectiveness of the resistance program was determined by measuring pre- and posttraining and detraining differences in isometric and isotonic (10RM) strength and hormonal responses in testosterone (T), sex hormone binding globulin, and free androgen index (FAI). Their maturation stage was evaluated according to Tanner. Significant posttraining isometric strength gains (17.5%) and mean T and FAI value increases (p < 0.05–0.001) were observed in STG. Detraining resulted in a significant loss (9.5%, p < 0.001) of isometric strength whereas the hormonal parameters of STG remained practically unaltered. The relative (Δ%) postdetraining hormonal responses correlated significantly with the respective isometric strength changes. In conclusion, the resistance training induced strength changes independent of the changes in the anabolic and androgenic activity in preadolescent males. Further research is needed to fully clarify the physiological mechanisms underlying the strength training and detraining process.
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    Maximal strength testing in healthy children.

    Faigenbaum AD, Milliken LA, Westcott WL.

    Department of Exercise Science and Physical Education, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts 02125, USA. avery.faigenbaum@umb.edu

    Strength training has become an accepted method of conditioning in children. However, there is concern among some observers that maximal strength testing may be inappropriate or potentially injurious to children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing in healthy children. Thirty-two girls and 64 boys between 6.2 and 12.3 years of age (mean age 9.3 +/- 1.6 years) volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects were screened for medical conditions that could worsen during maximal strength testing. Under close supervision by qualified professionals, each subject performed a 1RM test on 1 upper-body (standing chest press or seated chest press) and 1 lower-body (leg press or leg extension) exercise using child-size weight training machines. No injuries occurred during the study period, and the testing protocol was well tolerated by the subjects. No gender differences were found for any upper- or lower-body strength test. These findings demonstrate that healthy children can safely perform 1RM strength tests, provided that appropriate procedures are followed.
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    Pumping iron Jr. Weight training won't stunt a child's growth, but the lifts have to be chosen with care. Here's how.

    Smith IK.

    Publication Types:

    * News


    PMID: 11246789 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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    Thank you!
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    Quote Originally Posted by roidpuple
    the good ol grow plate.. oh man........ there are to many that started lifing at a really young age that grew just fine... what is the deal with this....
    your body is growing and adaptiong.... lou feriggno started lifting at like 13 and we went as heavy as he could grew to 6"4' just fine arnold started at 15 6"2'
    Dave drapper.... the list goes on and on.... look he has really short arms
    he must of did heavy bench when he was young before he stopped growing..
    ........ I dont think so.... " but ,yes Form is important that is very true"...
    I started lifting at 12...I am only 5'4"...and 40 now...OK..OK..I have short people in my family..
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    Quote Originally Posted by willieman
    I started lifting at 12...I am only 5'4"...and 40 now...OK..OK..I have short people in my family..
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    Yup I was powerlifting at the varsity level by time I was 15, and I grew over 6ft. tall. It's all good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roidpuple
    the good ol grow plate.. oh man........ there are to many that started lifing at a really young age that grew just fine... what is the deal with this....
    your body is growing and adaptiong.... lou feriggno started lifting at like 13 and we went as heavy as he could grew to 6"4' just fine arnold started at 15 6"2'
    Dave drapper.... the list goes on and on.... look he has really short arms
    he must of did heavy bench when he was young before he stopped growing..
    ........ I dont think so.... " but ,yes Form is important that is very true"...
    I'm not saying its bad, but everybody matures at different rates...some faster than others...I'm just restating what I learned in my kinesiology courses in school...better safe than sorry ya know, especially at a young age..

    Here's an article I found in "Scholastic Coach & Athletic Director"
    STRENGTH TRAINING FOR the pre-teenage and early-teenage athlete is steeped in the kind of ambiguity and misconceptions that have achieved mythological status.

    Though our early youth groups inculcate various physical and maturity considerations that require prudence and precaution, all of these concerns can be put to rest with intelligent screening, planning, instruction, and supervision.

    Allow us to shed a little light on a few of the most frequently asked questions and/or several of our own personal perspectives.

    Is Adolescent Weight Training Okay?

    Enough scientific research is available to answer with a resounding, yes!

    A vast majority of our exercise physiologists and pediatricians recommend some form of resistance training for medically' fit adolescents. In the prepubescent and usually preteen years, this may involve the use of bodyweight exercises such as push-ups, chin/pull-ups, parallel dips, sit-ups/crunches, etc.

    All of these very productive exercises offer an excellent introduction to the more advanced strength-training modes of future years.

    The physician must first determine whether the student is physically up to the task and then test the student's readiness through' a tool known as the Tanner Staging System, which evaluates secondary sexual characteristics and physical maturity.

    Boys normally make a growth spurt between ages 10-12, while girls make theirs as early as age 8 or as old as 14, and especially between ages 11-12 years.

    The bottom line is that most healthy youngsters--both boys and girls--are physically mature enough to begin a resistance program between ages 12-14.

    As a matter of fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Position Paper (<A id=ref_link title=1 href="http://calvin.linfield.edu:2273/citation.asp?tb=1&_ug=sid+9073 62F5%2D4A87%2D48DE%2D89B3%2D04 C9E08C14F4%40sessionmgr5+dbs+a ph%2Cawh%2Ccin20%2Cczh%2Chxh%2 Chch%2Cf5h%2Ccmedm%2Csph%2Ctth +F67E&_us=hd+False+hs+False+or +Date+fh+False+ss+SO+sm+ES+sl+ %2D#bib1">1) supports the implementation of strength training so long as it is monitored by a trained adult and all of the medical considerations have been taken into account.

    The only major exception made by the AAP is to avoid repetitive maximal lifts (i.e., one-rep maximum lifts or lifts within 2-3 reps of a one-rep max).

    IS ADOLESCENT STRENGTH TRAINING BENEFICIAL?

    A common safety question concerns the epiphyseal junctures ("growth plates") at the ends of the bones. For many years, it was speculated that strength training could damage the composition of this bony matter, from which healthy bone continues to emanate until full skeletal growth is completed. This is where the "growth stunting" myth surfaced.

    There is absolutely no scientific evidence that a sound, supervised strength-training program can have an adverse effect on these body structures. On the contrary, strength training can not only strengthen the bones and make them more resilient to injuries, but can enhance the muscular strength and endurance of the youngsters, just as it does with adults.

    These increases in strength appear to be the result of heightened neuromuscular activation--the nervous system learns to adapt more efficiently to the new stimulus. This is especially true with prepubescents, who do not yet possess enough circulating androgens (growth enhancing hormones) for large increases in muscle mass. In other words, they can get stronger without necessarily getting bigger.

    Strength training also plays a major role in enhancing the durability of connective tissue (ligaments and tendons), minimizing the injury potential of your athlete.

    From a psychological standpoint, strength training can provide a great boost in the individual's confidence and self-esteem--a component of special significance to emotionally fragile age groups.

    WHAT SHOULD AND SHOULD NOT BE DONE?

    In keeping with several recommendations of the AAP and from our own experience, we would like to offer the following recommendations:

    Seek medical evaluation and clearance from the child's physician. Make it clear that the youngster plans to engage in strength training and that you are interested in securing a comprehensive examination and any helpful recommendations before starting.

    Once cleared, make the child aware that the strength-training program will focus on proper techniques and gradual progression. It will not be a competitive endeavor to see how much weight can be lifted.

    Place the child under the supervision and guidance of a qualified instructor. Educational background and experience are, in our opinion, the most decisive factors in this determination. Certification(s) with nationally recognized and well-respected organizations can be considered.

    As recommended by the AAP, preadolescents and adolescents should avoid competitive weightlifting, power lifting, bodybuilding, and maximum lifts until they reach the appropriately determined physical and skeletal maturity.

    Exercises and sets per training session: Choose 10-12 exercises and perform one set of 10-15 quality reps of each, or choose fewer exercises (e.g., 5-6) and perform 2-3 sets of each. However, we would still keep the total volume to about 10-12 total sets.

    Select basic exercises, initially machine-based ones for teaching purposes, that stimulate the leg/hip/low back regions, chest, shoulders, upper back, abdominals, and arms. Many of these exercises and modalities we've described in past articles will suffice, though the set and rep schemes must be tailored to this age group.

    The youngster should make slow, gradual weight increments-no more than 1-2.5 lbs. once 15 reps are achieved.

    Recommendations on lifting frequency will vary from as few as one day per week to as many as four days per week, depending on who you ask. We recommend 1-3 days per week on a nonconsecutive basis. Don't wear the kid out; instead make it a fun and informative period in his life.

    A primary goal of the parent/coach should be to educate the child on a good lifestyle habit that will provide health benefits for many years to come. And, remember; just as with adults, more is not necessarily better when it comes to strength training. In fact, too much of it can only induce a mental tedium that will result in diminishing returns and injuries.

    REFERENCES

    American Academy of Pediatrics; "Policy Statement: Strength Training by Children and Adolescents," Pediatrics, June 2001.

    <A name="">A. Faigenbaum; W. Westcott; R. LaRosa Loud; and C. Long: "The Effects of Different Resistance Training Protocols on Muscular Strength and Endurance Development in Children," Pediatrics, 1999.

    NOTE: Hammer, Nautilus, Med-X, Gravitron, and PowerLift are trademark equipment names.

    ~~~~~~~~

    By Ken Mannie, Strength/Conditioning Coach, Michigan State University (Exercises performed by Alaina Mannie)
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    yes all a myth... hell they use to not let basketball players lift weights...
    they thought it would slow them down...
  

  
 

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