Recent research on static stretching

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  1. Quote Originally Posted by Randoja View Post
    I hear ya, but wouldn't stretching reduce the elasticity of your connective tissue to some extent as well?
    No, it shouldn't.

    Static stretching desensitizes the muscle spindles, which means less discharge (to induce a stronger contraction) upon stretch.


  2. Quote Originally Posted by Randoja View Post
    I hear ya, but wouldn't stretching reduce the elasticity of your connective tissue to some extent as well?
    No. If anything, it'll increase the elasticity of the tendons, but we're not talking about a huge difference. Each piece of powerlifting gear is different in terms of ply, the cut, the material, the seem placement, etc. Depending on these factors, the feel and "groove" of each piece is different and will have a different effect on the person. The tighter the buy is, the harder it is to manipulate it and requires a greater degree of strength to actually use each piece. For example, when I put on my briefs, it takes me about 405 to hit parallel. Throw on the suit bottoms, and I need about 600 to hit parallel. Put on the straps and it can take another 40-60lbs to hit parallel.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys

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  3. I get what you guys are saying, I think I am just making a poor comparison to PL gear I guess. I mean to say coming in tight is going to provide you with tension in muscles and connective tissue that keeps you tight and can support more of a load. Stretching out is going to undoubtedly take some of that away, decreasing your max workload to some extent.
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  4. Quote Originally Posted by Randoja View Post
    Good to know.
    Gear is the most misunderstood thing about powerlifting. Most think you can throw on a shirt and it automatically adds 100lbs to your bench. The reality is that most don't have the technique to use the shirt properly let alone get anything out of it.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  5. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    Gear is the most misunderstood thing about powerlifting. Most think you can throw on a shirt and it automatically adds 100lbs to your bench. The reality is that most don't have the technique to use the shirt properly let alone get anything out of it.
    There was a guy in my old gym who entered his first PL comp so decided to try out a bench shirt.

    He put 220lbs on the bar and said he couldn't even get it to his chest so went up to 310lbs. He reached his chest on the eccentric phase but pushed it completely out of line on the way up and dropped in on his throat before the spotters could intervene.

    So, to agree with your point he failed to lift a weight he was able to lift raw and narrowly escaped serious injury.
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    No. If anything, it'll increase the elasticity of the tendons
    I'm not so sure if that's a good thing...at least the last thing we want is our tendons to become lax. The less energy they absorb, the more energy that is transferred into the ground (or load). If they have too much elasticity, or ability to stretch, then energy is lost. I think its synonymous with a shooting bow string. The bend and tension should be due to the recoil of the bow itself (the muscles), not the recoil the of string. In fact, the first hunting bows were made out of tendons.

    Br

  7. Quote Originally Posted by bdcc View Post
    There was a guy in my old gym who entered his first PL comp so decided to try out a bench shirt.

    He put 220lbs on the bar and said he couldn't even get it to his chest so went up to 310lbs. He reached his chest on the eccentric phase but pushed it completely out of line on the way up and dropped in on his throat before the spotters could intervene.

    So, to agree with your point he failed to lift a weight he was able to lift raw and narrowly escaped serious injury.
    I think I left some confusion in my post. Each piece of gear requires a certain manipulation to it. Depending on this, you will need a certain amount of raw strength before you will be able to get anything out of the particular piece of equipment with the most important element being technique. Each ply and/or layer that you add will require more and more technical proficiency and adaptation before you will be able to get anything out of the gear.

    For example, one of the guys who joined the crew in November had never used a shirt. It took him 3 months of training and technique adjustment before he was able to press his raw 1RM in a shirt because it altered the movement pattern so much. The particular shirt that he uses, a Metal Bash Pro, is not a particularly stiff shirt and it is a relatively loose shirt.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  8. Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    I'm not so sure if that's a good thing...at least the last thing we want is our tendons to become lax. The less energy they absorb, the more energy that is transferred into the ground (or load). If they have too much elasticity, or ability to stretch, then energy is lost. I think its synonymous with a shooting bow string. The bend and tension should be due to the recoil of the bow itself (the muscles), not the recoil the of string. In fact, the first hunting bows were made out of tendons.

    Br
    That's why I made sure to say nothing huge in terms of difference in elasticity. There will be some slight increase, which will help with stretch-reflex, but even that will limited without specific training.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  9. Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    I'm not so sure if that's a good thing...at least the last thing we want is our tendons to become lax. The less energy they absorb, the more energy that is transferred into the ground (or load). If they have too much elasticity, or ability to stretch, then energy is lost. I think its synonymous with a shooting bow string. The bend and tension should be due to the recoil of the bow itself (the muscles), not the recoil the of string. In fact, the first hunting bows were made out of tendons.

    Br
    This is the basis of what I was trying to say, I appreciate you putting it more eloquently than I was able to.
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