Deadlifts&spinal compression - AnabolicMinds.com

Deadlifts&spinal compression

  1. mccallister's Avatar
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    Deadlifts&spinal compression


    How bad are heavy deadlifts (executed with proper form) at the 6-10 rep range for the health and longevity of the spine in the long term. This is kind of long shot question, but I was doing very heavy deads the other day and it got me thinking about how much the spine must be compressed as well as the stress placed upon other joints when you have a significant amount of weight on the bar

  2. asooneyeonig's Avatar
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    trick question. as long as you are strong enough it will only help.

    go to google scholar and look up research from stuart mcgill and robin mckenzie. those are the 2 foremost authorities on spinal biomechanics IMO. im sure they will have an answer you are looking for, if you look long enough.
    you can call me "ozzie" for short.
  3. Rodja's Avatar
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    Squats will probably lead to more spinal compression than deads since the TUT is longer and the bar is loaded directly on the spine.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
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    Technique and ability to maintain a neutral or even slightly lordic spine plays a huge role in this as well. When you lose that natural arch in your back the anterior intervertebral disk space is reduced (i.e.: compression increased). When you keep the back arched, then the disks rotate on the facet joints, and both anterior and posterior intervertebral disk space is increased.

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  5. Jahcuree
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja
    Squats will probably lead to more spinal compression than deads since the TUT is longer and the bar is loaded directly on the spine.
    Using a reverse -hyper extension machine properly after heavy squats will help with minimizing compression.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jahcuree View Post
    Using a reverse -hyper extension machine properly after heavy squats will help with minimizing compression.
    That depends on where the compression is located. If it's the lumbar, then a reverse hyper will help, but it will not help for thoracic issues.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys
  7. mccallister's Avatar
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    Thank you for all the responses. I suppose that if one has acquired strength naturally then joint strength and muscle strength will be able to lift heavy loads with proper form safely, in terms of long term back issues
  

  
 

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