What is over training?

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  1. Quote Originally Posted by willc86 View Post
    oh so working out legs 2times a week is good?
    I train everything 2x/week.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys



  2. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    I train everything 2x/week.
    ^ Same here.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
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  3. il go with that lads thanks so split legs into twice per week hit them at a few different angles and drop some of the machines i will keep you informed on my progress thanks again,anyone any thoughts on my diet UkNoko thought my diet looked like a weighloss plan thats not realy what im after any thoughts on this?

  4. Taken from Aceto overtraining article:

    Another factor influences recovery is training frequency. For the most part, I believe you have to train a muscle once every 5 to 8 days. In general, if you train a body part more frequently ? for instance, training chest every fourth day ? you won't grow due to over training. On the other hand, if you wait more than 8 days, you'll also fail to grow.

    goes on to saying:

    To avoid over training, you'll need a training strategy that allows you to hit each body part once every 5 to 8 days with 7 to 8 being the ideal.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Young Gotti View Post
    Taken from Aceto overtraining article:

    Another factor influences recovery is training frequency. For the most part, I believe you have to train a muscle once every 5 to 8 days. In general, if you train a body part more frequently ? for instance, training chest every fourth day ? you won't grow due to over training. On the other hand, if you wait more than 8 days, you'll also fail to grow.

    goes on to saying:

    To avoid over training, you'll need a training strategy that allows you to hit each body part once every 5 to 8 days with 7 to 8 being the ideal.
    there have been many people that have gotten larger from training a muscle/movement 2-4 times a week. then you look at pete cisco and his followers that may go up to 10-14 days between movements/muscles and they are getting bigger as well. if you include the other variables like intensity, volume, rest, food, stress levels, training age, active recovery techniques, etc, i hope that you can see that one can train however one likes as long as you take into account all the variables.
    you can call me "ozzie" for short.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by asooneyeonig View Post
    there have been many people that have gotten larger from training a muscle/movement 2-4 times a week. then you look at pete cisco and his followers that may go up to 10-14 days between movements/muscles and they are getting bigger as well. if you include the other variables like intensity, volume, rest, food, stress levels, training age, active recovery techniques, etc, i hope that you can see that one can train however one likes as long as you take into account all the variables.
    i understand, i'm just quoting an article, but even with all those variables....overtraining is still very possible

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Young Gotti
    Taken from Aceto overtraining article:

    Another factor influences recovery is training frequency. For the most part, I believe you have to train a muscle once every 5 to 8 days. In general, if you train a body part more frequently ? for instance, training chest every fourth day ? you won't grow due to over training. On the other hand, if you wait more than 8 days, you'll also fail to grow.

    goes on to saying:

    To avoid over training, you'll need a training strategy that allows you to hit each body part once every 5 to 8 days with 7 to 8 being the ideal.
    I have been doing a protocol involving widowmakers + full body wo EOD & one day for DLs. After a while felt like a wreck and then added 1000kcal to my diet and got my mojo back few days later. Great stuff to add some poundage on your squats when you hit plateau.

    I only had been close to overtraining when I was doing lots of running. But it was more a psychological burn out with the routine than anything else.
    Check out my current log: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/supplement-reviews-logs/195262-iforce-tropinol-testabolan.html

  8. Quote Originally Posted by Young Gotti View Post
    Taken from Aceto overtraining article:

    Another factor influences recovery is training frequency. For the most part, I believe you have to train a muscle once every 5 to 8 days. In general, if you train a body part more frequently ? for instance, training chest every fourth day ? you won't grow due to over training. On the other hand, if you wait more than 8 days, you'll also fail to grow.

    goes on to saying:

    To avoid over training, you'll need a training strategy that allows you to hit each body part once every 5 to 8 days with 7 to 8 being the ideal.
    We have already covered overtraining has nothing to do with you're saying it is.

    I have trained squats four days per week and still grew.

    Westside barbell - the strongest powerlifters in the world train everything 2X week.

    5-6 days is not a magical number. I train each movement every 3-4 days and I have never had a problem stimulating hypertrophy.

    The amount of volume was not accounted for in your post.

    You determine your recovery ability. If you let your body get used to training once every 7 days that's what it will be accustomed to.

    Mark Rippetoe has his clients train squats 3X a week. And it's the 2nd most demanding lift of all.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  9. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    We have already covered overtraining has nothing to do with you're saying it is.

    I have trained squats four days per week and still grew.

    Westside barbell - the strongest powerlifters in the world train everything 2X week.

    5-6 days is not a magical number. I train each movement every 3-4 days and I have never had a problem stimulating hypertrophy.

    The amount of volume was not accounted for in your post.

    You determine your recovery ability. If you let your body get used to training once every 7 days that's what it will be accustomed to.

    Mark Rippetoe has his clients train squats 3X a week. And it's the 2nd most demanding lift of all.

    again, i was just copying and pasting from an article about overtraining.....from a fairly respected man in the industry

  10. Everybody has heard it at some time or another "You're over training! That's why you're not making serious gains". But, do we understand what it means? I mean really understand what it means? Once you understand how to keep your body fresh and free from over training, you'll make some serious mass/strength gains.

    Over training means the body is being put under greater stress than it can handle; it's that simple. Any additional stress that is above and beyond what your own body can handle will result in a failure to recover and grow. It follows that you could be fairly dedicated, training with a routine you believe to be a well thought out approach to getting big; yet fail to move ahead and grow if your body is over trained. The real let down with overtraining is that you won't grow regardless of nutrition! If you are in an over trained state, muscle growth and recovery comes to a dead-stop no matter how much you pump your body with protein, carbs, creatine, glutamine and/or essential fatty acids.

    The intangible part of over training is that it varies greatly from person to person. Stress adaptation is the body's ability to deal with and recover from hardcore training. This is different for every bodybuilder out there; just as the metabolism will vary from person to person. We all know people who can eat a lot of junk and get away with it, while others seem to blow up when they marginally overeat. With training, you have to discover and hone what your body can handle and what it can't handle. Once you strike the right balance, the gains will come rather easily. With regards to overtraining and how it varies from person to person, let me tell you about a retired top pro I used to consult with. This pro frequently performed at least 20 to 24 sets for larger body parts and 15 or so for smaller body parts, taking each and every set to total failure. Every training partner he hooked up with never grew, ending up completely over trained while the pro continued to grow. Before you assume "Yea that's because all those pro's use anabolic steroids", I can tell you this pro trained clean (yes, drug free for the majority of the year) and very often his training partners were not drug free. There are several lessons to be learned from this anecdote:

    1) What's too much for one individual may not be for another.

    2) If you over train and hit the body too hard without adequate rest and recovery, you won't make gains even if you take steroids!

    I always said, this particular pro made it to the pro ranks on hard work and exceptional recovery ability.

    One of the dumbest things that I have ever heard is that "There's no such thing as over training, just under eating". The idea is so far off the mark and ill advised, I don't even want to spend much time with it. The fact is, nutrition can only support the body so far. When exercise stress exceeds your body's own tolerance for recovery, you go back wards. You don't grow; even if you are eating a lot.

    When Dorian Yates burst onto the scene, he followed up on the ideas formulated by Tom Platz and Mike Mentzer years earlier. Dorian's take on things was consistent with Tom and Mike's which was that most bodybuilders fail to grow because they train with too many sets (known as volume) and usually train too frequently. This can be characterized by training everyday or not taking enough rest days. Platz, Mentzer and Dorian were right. When you train too much, you don't grow. However, Mentzer fell into the trap that "If more is not better than less ? even far less may be radically better." So the pendulum shifted from heavy volume to far fewer sets. Suddenly, bodybuilders were doing 6 sets for chest or 8 to 10 sets for back which in my opinion is not enough to optimally stimulate growth. To understand why their approach may have been a little bit overboard, here's brief note on physiology. Building muscle relies on the weight you use. Pretty simple, right? If you can perform a set of barbell curls with 150 pounds, you'll stimulate far more growth than using only 100 pounds. No matter how you cut it, the weight you use is critically important in stimulating the muscle growth. After the weight comes volume or the total number of sets you perform. Volume influences muscle growth. If you do not perform enough sets, you'll fail to trigger growth. If you get carried away and do too many, you'll over train and also fail to grow. So you have to find a balance, a happy medium.

    BUT CHRIS, WHERE IS THE HAPPY MEDIUM??!?

    It depends on a number of factors, but here are some guidelines to help you sidestep the pitfalls of overtraining.

    1) The More Sets You Perform, the Better

    Just as the greater the weight you handle, the better in terms of muscle recruitment; the more sets you do, the greater you'll work a muscle. The thing you really have to distinguish is where to stop. To illustrate the point, just ask yourself is three sets of bicep curls really better than one? Of course, the answer is yes. Is five better than three. Most likely. Is 7 better than five? The point where you have to stop or the point where more sets are no longer helping is typically where you lose the "feel" or "pump" in the muscle or where your poundages start to drop. For example, Victor Martinez can't do 20 straight sets of standing barbell curls with 120 pounds. After the sixth set, he will no longer be able to use 120 pounds. If he was aiming to do 8 to 10 reps per set, after set number five, six or seven, the weight he can handle will drop off quite a bit meaning it's time to move onto another exercise. When you reach a point where the poundage starts to fade, that's it. For some people like a beginner or intermediate that might be 2 to 3 sets while for someone like Victor it might be 5 to 6 sets. It's important to listen to your body and move on when you need to. If you lose a pump, move on. When your poundages drop and you can't handle the same heavy weight for each continuous set, move on to another exercise!

    2) Speed Of Reps Count

    The speed or perceived speed at which you move a weight influences how many sets you can do. Outside of the weight and total number of sets you perform, the speed at which you drive a weight has an influence on growth and can determine your own personal threshold for over training within each training session. Moving a weight fast, with speed and aggression, is far better for growth than moving a weight with a slow and even speed. That's because in trying to "drive a weight" with the intensity of a bullet coming out of a gun, a far greater number of muscle fibers come into play than simply moving the weight with a slow cadence. Slow training, in my opinion, is a gimmick and has no real place in mass building plans. If you want to grow, you should pick a heavy weight and drive the weight while maintaining good form. Of course when you drive a weight, there's not going to be a lot of momentum created because when you overload the muscle with a heavy weight, the poundage radically cuts down on the creation of momentum. In overloading a muscle with a heavy weight and driving the weight by pushing it fast rather than super slow, you physiologically create the greatest amount of stress on the muscle as possible. One way to discover whether you are about to do too much is by getting in touch with your ability to drive a weight. If you go into the gym and there's no oomph to the muscle and you can't explode or drive the first few sets of an exercise (after warming up of course) you are already over trained. Get out of the gym! On the other hand, if there is a lot of snap in the muscle ? you can drive those heavy weights and you feel powerful, obviously you are not overtraining and should proceed with the workout.

    3) Frequency Counts

    Another factor influences recovery is training frequency. For the most part, I believe you have to train a muscle once every 5 to 8 days. In general, if you train a body part more frequently ? for instance, training chest every fourth day ? you won't grow due to over training. On the other hand, if you wait more than 8 days, you'll also fail to grow. In this case not by over training but by failing to train frequently enough. You see, the muscles grow by stimulating them, then resting. If you rest too long ? waiting too many days before hitting the same muscle group for another workout, the stress on the body appears to be too great which overwhelms the recovery process leading to a lack of growth. Let's put it this way, imagine training legs on Monday and then again on Wednesday. The time in between is too short, so you over train. Now try training them for a second time 10 ?12 days after the first workout. What happens? The time between training is so long your legs become immensely sore the second time you train which can also trigger over training. You need balance, not too often and not too infrequent. To avoid over training, you'll need a training strategy that allows you to hit each body part once every 5 to 8 days with 7 to 8 being the ideal.
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  11. 4) Too Many Days In a Row

    If mass is the goal, you have to rest. Many bodybuilders won't be able to train more than two consecutive days – or at least should not train for more than two consecutive days in a row – because training for more than two days usually causes hormonal changes that lead to over training. Typically, in an over training state, testosterone levels start to drop a little. In addition, you'll experience a small surge in cortisol levels. Cortisol is the stress hormone released from the adrenal cortex that sits just atop the kidneys and it increases in response to stress. In small amounts it actually contributes to anabolism – the building up in muscle tissue. However, when released in larger amounts, especially when testosterone levels drop even mildly, it tends to tear muscle down creating a catabolic scenario. I've found most bodybuilders can not train for more than two consecutive days in a row before having to take a day or rest. For most individuals, good gains can be realized following the 2 day on 1 day off system where half the body is trained in two days followed by a day of rest. Then the other half of the body is trained in two days followed by another day of rest. In fact, even following this approach many (hard training) bodybuilders and athletes could risk slipping into a state of over training. Chronically, even the one day off becomes inefficient at facilitating recovery. The next logical step is to incorporate another day off after 3 cycles of following the 2 on 1 off system. For example, after cycling through 2 on, 1 off where you train all the body parts at least one time, repeat this for three cycles then incorporate another day off.

    Day 1 – Chest & Biceps

    Day 2 – Quads, Hamstrings & Calves

    Day 3 – Rest

    Day 4 – Back & Abs

    Day 5 – Shoulders & Triceps

    Day 6 – Rest

    This is equal to one cycle. After going through three cycles, tag on another rest day such as follows

    Day 1 – Chest & Biceps

    Day 2 – Quads, Hamstrings & Calves

    Day 3 – Rest

    Day 4 – Rest

    Day 5 – Back & Abs

    Day 6 – Shoulders & Triceps

    Day 7 – Rest

    Day 8 – Rest

    This added rest day can ensure you don't over train. At this point, you would go back to the original two on one off schedule.

    5) Hormones Count

    Some bodybuilders resort to shooting illegal anabolic steroids in hopes of adding mass. Illegal anabolic steroids help prevent over training – at least for a few weeks. The reason why is because it all boils down to the interplay of hormones: testosterone, thyroid, growth hormone and cortisol. Overtraining plays havoc with your own anabolic hormones – suppressing them – while dramatically increasing the circulation of catabolic hormones. In part 2, we'll take a closer look at hormones and what you can do naturally, from diet to supplements, to alter your hormonal status to help you overcome the perils of over training.

  12. Good Lord.... once again that's NOT overtraining.

    Dumb Thing #5: Misunderstanding "Overtraining"
    If you ask me, "overtraining" is the most abused and misunderstood concept in the entire strength training community! Perform more than twelve sets for a muscle during a workout and you'll undoubtedly be accused of overtraining. Train a muscle group more often than two times per week? Overtraining! Relying on set extending methods such as drop sets, pre or post-fatigue, or rest-pause? What are you doing? Don't you know that's overtraining and you'll shrink faster than your masculine pride on a snowy Canadian winter night?!


    Yes, overtraining can eventually become a problem when it comes to your training performance, injury risks, and growth. However, it's far from being as common as most people would have you believe.


    The problem stems from the term itself, which is composed of "over" and "training." Because of that term, individuals are quick to equate it to "training too much." So every time someone thinks that a routine has too much volume, frequency, or advanced methods, they're quick to pull the "overtraining" trigger. When someone is tired and has a few bad workouts he'll also automatically assume that he's "overtraining." In both cases this shows a misunderstanding of what overtraining really is.


    Overtraining is a physiological state caused by an excess accumulation of physiological, psychological, emotional, environmental, and chemical stress that leads to a sustained decrease in physical and mental performance, and that requires a relatively long recovery period. There are four important elements in that scientific definition:


    "Physiological state:" Overtraining isn't an action (i.e. training too much) but a state in which your body can be put through. In that regard, it's similar to a burnout, a medical depression, or an illness.


    "Caused by an excess accumulation of physiological, psychological, emotional, environmental, and chemical stress:" Stress has both a localized and a systemic effect. Every type of stress has a systemic impact on the body; this impact isn't limited to the structures involved directly in the "stressful event." This systemic impact is caused by the release of stress hormones (glucocorticoids like cortisol for example) and an overexertion of the adrenal glands.


    So every single type of stressor out there can contribute to the onset of an overtraining state. Job troubles, tension in a relationship, death in the family, pollutants and chemicals in the air we breathe, the food we eat or the water we drink, etc. can all contribute to overtraining. Training too much is obviously another stress factor that can facilitate the onset of the overtraining state, but it's far from being the sole murder suspect.


    "Leads to a sustained decrease in physical and mental performance:" The key term here is sustained. Some people will have a few sub par workouts and will automatically assume they're overtraining. Not the case. It could simply be acute or accumulated fatigue due to poor recovery management or a deficient dietary approach.


    A real overtraining state/syndrome takes months of excessive stress to build up. And when someone reaches that state, it'll take several weeks (even several months) of rest and recovery measures to get back to a "normal" physiological state. If a few days of rest or active rest can get your performance back up to par, you weren't overtraining. You probably suffered from some fatigue accumulation, that's all.


    Worst case scenario, you might enter an overreaching state (a transient form of overtraining). Reaching that point will normally take 10-14 days of rest and active rest to get back up to normal. Overreaching can actually be used as a training tool since the body normally surcompensates (with rest) following overreaching. Elite athletes often include periods of drastic training stress increases followed by a 10-14 day taper to reach a peak performance level on a certain date.


    "That requires a relatively long recovery period:" As we already mentioned, reaching a true overtraining state takes a long period of excessive stress and requires a long period of recovery. The following graphic illustrates the various steps toward the onset of an overtraining state as well as the recovery period needed to get out of these different levels.

    The spectrum goes from acute fatigue, which is the normal fatigue caused by a very intense/demanding workout, right up to a true overtraining state. In all my life, I've seen two cases of real overtraining. In both cases this happened to two high level athletes right after the Olympic Games (accumulation of the super intense training, the stress of qualifying for the Olympics, and the stress of the Olympics themselves).

    Understand that most international level athletes will train close to 30-40 hours per week. Obviously not all of that is spent in the gym; they also have their sport practice, speed and agility work, conditioning work, etc., but these still represent a physiological stress. Yet rarely will these athletes reach a true overtraining state.


    How could training for a total of five or six hours per week cause overtraining? Fatigue, yes, mostly due to improper recovery management, a very low level of general physical preparation (conditioning level), or a mediocre work capacity.


    To paraphrase Louie Simmons, North American athletes are out of shape. Being out of shape (low level of general preparedness or conditioning) means you can't recover well from a high volume of work. But the more work you can perform, without going beyond your capacity to recover, the more you'll progress. So in that regard, poor work capacity can be the real problem behind lack of gains from a program.


    By continually avoiding performing a high level of physical work, you'll never increase your work capacity and will suffer from accumulated fatigue as soon as you increase your training stress ever so slightly. Obviously, the solution isn't to jump into mega-volume training, but to gradually include more GPP work as well as periods of increased training stress that will increase in duration and frequency over time.

    Ask any of my clients — they must all go through four-week phases of very high volume work interlaced between phases of "normal" volume training (or even phases of low volume). And as they progress through the system, the high volume phases will become more frequent (as their work capacity improves) or last longer.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  13. To paraphrase Louie Simmons, North American athletes are out of shape. Being out of shape (low level of general preparedness or conditioning) means you can't recover well from a high volume of work. But the more work you can perform, without going beyond your capacity to recover, the more you'll progress. So in that regard, poor work capacity can be the real problem behind lack of gains from a program.
    This needs to be highlighted. BB'ers, despite not looking like it, are extremely out of shape and there is barely an emphasis on conditioning to increase work capacity. Having a high work capacity not only increases your training threshold, it also allows you to recover faster and lessens chance of injury.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  14. lol holy lord what have I started!

    Now I am confused O_o

  15. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Good Lord.... once again that's NOT overtraining.

    Dumb Thing #5: Misunderstanding "Overtraining"
    If you ask me, "overtraining" is the most abused and misunderstood concept in the entire strength training community! Perform more than twelve sets for a muscle during a workout and you'll undoubtedly be accused of overtraining. Train a muscle group more often than two times per week? Overtraining! Relying on set extending methods such as drop sets, pre or post-fatigue, or rest-pause? What are you doing? Don't you know that's overtraining and you'll shrink faster than your masculine pride on a snowy Canadian winter night?!


    Yes, overtraining can eventually become a problem when it comes to your training performance, injury risks, and growth. However, it's far from being as common as most people would have you believe.


    The problem stems from the term itself, which is composed of "over" and "training." Because of that term, individuals are quick to equate it to "training too much." So every time someone thinks that a routine has too much volume, frequency, or advanced methods, they're quick to pull the "overtraining" trigger. When someone is tired and has a few bad workouts he'll also automatically assume that he's "overtraining." In both cases this shows a misunderstanding of what overtraining really is.


    Overtraining is a physiological state caused by an excess accumulation of physiological, psychological, emotional, environmental, and chemical stress that leads to a sustained decrease in physical and mental performance, and that requires a relatively long recovery period. There are four important elements in that scientific definition:


    "Physiological state:" Overtraining isn't an action (i.e. training too much) but a state in which your body can be put through. In that regard, it's similar to a burnout, a medical depression, or an illness.


    "Caused by an excess accumulation of physiological, psychological, emotional, environmental, and chemical stress:" Stress has both a localized and a systemic effect. Every type of stress has a systemic impact on the body; this impact isn't limited to the structures involved directly in the "stressful event." This systemic impact is caused by the release of stress hormones (glucocorticoids like cortisol for example) and an overexertion of the adrenal glands.


    So every single type of stressor out there can contribute to the onset of an overtraining state. Job troubles, tension in a relationship, death in the family, pollutants and chemicals in the air we breathe, the food we eat or the water we drink, etc. can all contribute to overtraining. Training too much is obviously another stress factor that can facilitate the onset of the overtraining state, but it's far from being the sole murder suspect.


    "Leads to a sustained decrease in physical and mental performance:" The key term here is sustained. Some people will have a few sub par workouts and will automatically assume they're overtraining. Not the case. It could simply be acute or accumulated fatigue due to poor recovery management or a deficient dietary approach.


    A real overtraining state/syndrome takes months of excessive stress to build up. And when someone reaches that state, it'll take several weeks (even several months) of rest and recovery measures to get back to a "normal" physiological state. If a few days of rest or active rest can get your performance back up to par, you weren't overtraining. You probably suffered from some fatigue accumulation, that's all.


    Worst case scenario, you might enter an overreaching state (a transient form of overtraining). Reaching that point will normally take 10-14 days of rest and active rest to get back up to normal. Overreaching can actually be used as a training tool since the body normally surcompensates (with rest) following overreaching. Elite athletes often include periods of drastic training stress increases followed by a 10-14 day taper to reach a peak performance level on a certain date.


    "That requires a relatively long recovery period:" As we already mentioned, reaching a true overtraining state takes a long period of excessive stress and requires a long period of recovery. The following graphic illustrates the various steps toward the onset of an overtraining state as well as the recovery period needed to get out of these different levels.

    The spectrum goes from acute fatigue, which is the normal fatigue caused by a very intense/demanding workout, right up to a true overtraining state. In all my life, I've seen two cases of real overtraining. In both cases this happened to two high level athletes right after the Olympic Games (accumulation of the super intense training, the stress of qualifying for the Olympics, and the stress of the Olympics themselves).

    Understand that most international level athletes will train close to 30-40 hours per week. Obviously not all of that is spent in the gym; they also have their sport practice, speed and agility work, conditioning work, etc., but these still represent a physiological stress. Yet rarely will these athletes reach a true overtraining state.


    How could training for a total of five or six hours per week cause overtraining? Fatigue, yes, mostly due to improper recovery management, a very low level of general physical preparation (conditioning level), or a mediocre work capacity.


    To paraphrase Louie Simmons, North American athletes are out of shape. Being out of shape (low level of general preparedness or conditioning) means you can't recover well from a high volume of work. But the more work you can perform, without going beyond your capacity to recover, the more you'll progress. So in that regard, poor work capacity can be the real problem behind lack of gains from a program.


    By continually avoiding performing a high level of physical work, you'll never increase your work capacity and will suffer from accumulated fatigue as soon as you increase your training stress ever so slightly. Obviously, the solution isn't to jump into mega-volume training, but to gradually include more GPP work as well as periods of increased training stress that will increase in duration and frequency over time.

    Ask any of my clients — they must all go through four-week phases of very high volume work interlaced between phases of "normal" volume training (or even phases of low volume). And as they progress through the system, the high volume phases will become more frequent (as their work capacity improves) or last longer.



    can you give us a workout routine on what exactly can reach towards overtraining?

  16. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    ^ Same here.


    when should I start training everything twice a week? I am in a bulking stage and trying to mass up. I've been told to just work a muscle group once a week when trying to bulk. I am at 205 now I am just trying to get to 220...for now lol

  17. Quote Originally Posted by willc86 View Post
    can you give us a workout routine on what exactly can reach towards overtraining?
    Read the article completely over. There's no workout routine that overtrains you. It's accumulated fatigue over several months.

    There is a chart that guidelines how exactly overtraining occurs.

    Your body will reach an overreaching stage before overtraining will become an issue. If you were overtraining, you'd know it.

    Train a muscle group more often than two times per week? Overtraining! Relying on set extending methods such as drop sets, pre or post-fatigue, or rest-pause? What are you doing? Don't you know that's overtraining and you'll shrink faster than your masculine pride on a snowy Canadian winter night?!
    ^ Notice the sarcasm in that particular part of the article?

    Overtraining refers to the nervous system.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    This needs to be highlighted. BB'ers, despite not looking like it, are extremely out of shape and there is barely an emphasis on conditioning to increase work capacity. Having a high work capacity not only increases your training threshold, it also allows you to recover faster and lessens chance of injury.
    Exactly.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  18. Is Aceto even relevant in the business anymore? I haven't heard anything from him in awhile.

  19. oh boy lol

  20. Quote Originally Posted by willc86 View Post
    when should I start training everything twice a week? I am in a bulking stage and trying to mass up. I've been told to just work a muscle group once a week when trying to bulk. I am at 205 now I am just trying to get to 220...for now lol
    Once per week is not enough frequency.

    This is the routine I always recommend. I found it on another site. ZiR RED (he posts on here too) is the one I got it from.

    Monday: Upper Body, horizontal emphasis, vertical maintenance
    3X5 Bench Press
    3X5 BB Rows
    3X10 Incline Press
    3X10 Pullups
    3X10 CG Bench Press

    Tuesday: Lower Body, posterior chain emphasis, quad maintenance
    3X5 Back Squat
    3X5 SLDL
    5X3 Power Cleans
    3X10 Front Squat
    3X10 Abs

    Thursday: Upper Body, vertical emphasis, horizontal maintenance
    3X5 Strict Press
    3X5 Weighted Chin-ups
    3X10 Bench Press
    3X10 Barbell Rows
    3X10 DB Curls

    Friday: Lower Body, quad emphasis, posterior chain maintenance
    3X5 Front Squat
    3X5 Deadlifts
    3X5 Single legged lunges
    5X3 Power Cleans
    3X10 Abs
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  21. Quote Originally Posted by Grmlock View Post
    Is Aceto even relevant in the business anymore? I haven't heard anything from him in awhile.
    the article i posted was originally posted march 21, 2012

  22. Quote Originally Posted by Young Gotti View Post
    the article i posted was originally posted march 21, 2012
    Relevant and active are different. I can't recall him prepping anyone lately.

  23. Quote Originally Posted by Grmlock View Post
    Relevant and active are different. I can't recall him prepping anyone lately.
    i'm sure he's working with people...i dunno....but his track record shows he knows what he's talking about....so usually when he writes an article, it's spot on

  24. Quote Originally Posted by Young Gotti View Post
    i'm sure he's working with people...i dunno....but his track record shows he knows what he's talking about....so usually when he writes an article, it's spot on
    Perhaps in nutrition, but overtraining is a CNS issue. At no point in the article did he mention the CNS, 1RM load, waving, etc.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  25. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    This needs to be highlighted. BB'ers, despite not looking like it, are extremely out of shape and there is barely an emphasis on conditioning to increase work capacity. Having a high work capacity not only increases your training threshold, it also allows you to recover faster and lessens chance of injury.
    That gives me a perspective on something.
    I've got a colleague who's doing BB-style workouts since "forever" and despite it he's bit overweight (27% bf) and quite often complaining on soreness after his leg routine. I've been training for ultramarathons last year after few years of running (Mind that I wasn't fond of exercise when I was younger at all) and doing a bit of weight training on-off. Now I focus more on weights, I recover much faster than him from my trainings and, well, I don't feel like dying after 5k run as he does.
    Could it be that my body is generally better conditioned because of endurance running and that's why I recover faster?
    Check out my current log: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/supplement-reviews-logs/195262-iforce-tropinol-testabolan.html

  26. Quote Originally Posted by UKNoko View Post
    That gives me a perspective on something.
    I've got a colleague who's doing BB-style workouts since "forever" and despite it he's bit overweight (27% bf) and quite often complaining on soreness after his leg routine. I've been training for ultramarathons last year after few years of running (Mind that I wasn't fond of exercise when I was younger at all) and doing a bit of weight training on-off. Now I focus more on weights, I recover much faster than him from my trainings and, well, I don't feel like dying after 5k run as he does.
    Could it be that my body is generally better conditioned because of endurance running and that's why I recover faster?
    Yes, being in that kind of condition helps recovery a lot. His problem is just too much excess adipose on his frame, which is causing more general stress.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  27. Quote Originally Posted by Rodja View Post
    Yes, being in that kind of condition helps recovery a lot. His problem is just too much excess adipose on his frame, which is causing more general stress.
    Thanks. I could not understand it until now, as he's much stronger and training for so much longer than me.
    About excess adipose tissue, well he's working on it now. Interestingly he was oblivious to the fact of how much fat he is carrying until just recently. Now he has better diet and does HIT.
    Check out my current log: http://anabolicminds.com/forum/supplement-reviews-logs/195262-iforce-tropinol-testabolan.html

  28. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Rodja, you're becoming one of my favorite posters on this board,
    I would say the same thing, then he goes and says something like "inadequate cool-down".

  29. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Once per week is not enough frequency.

    This is the routine I always recommend. I found it on another site. ZiR RED (he posts on here too) is the one I got it from.

    Monday: Upper Body, horizontal emphasis, vertical maintenance
    3X5 Bench Press
    3X5 BB Rows
    3X10 Incline Press
    3X10 Pullups
    3X10 CG Bench Press

    Tuesday: Lower Body, posterior chain emphasis, quad maintenance
    3X5 Back Squat
    3X5 SLDL
    5X3 Power Cleans
    3X10 Front Squat
    3X10 Abs

    Thursday: Upper Body, vertical emphasis, horizontal maintenance
    3X5 Strict Press
    3X5 Weighted Chin-ups
    3X10 Bench Press
    3X10 Barbell Rows
    3X10 DB Curls

    Friday: Lower Body, quad emphasis, posterior chain maintenance
    3X5 Front Squat
    3X5 Deadlifts
    3X5 Single legged lunges
    5X3 Power Cleans
    3X10 Abs
    that sounds good =) I will try this out for 6-8 weeks see how it goes.

    So, Should I lift heavy each workout? like example Monday go heavy and thursday go heavy again or go a bit lighter? And when I mean heavy, hit fatigue everyset

  30. Quote Originally Posted by willc86 View Post
    that sounds good =) I will try this out for 6-8 weeks see how it goes.

    So, Should I lift heavy each workout? like example Monday go heavy and thursday go heavy again or go a bit lighter? And when I mean heavy, hit fatigue everyset
    6-8 weeks isn't even time to see significant results with anything.

    Monday you'd go heavy with rows and bench (4-6 rep range), light with inclines and pullups (8-12 rep range).

    Thursday you'd go heavy with presses and pullups (4-6 rep range), light with flat bench and rows (8-12 rep range).

    Each Monday, your bench should increase 5-10lbs. It's pointless to workout if you're not using progressive overload and giving the muscle greater stimulus each session.

    Same thing with your light inclines and pullups, you should increase their weight 5-10lbs each session too.

    Each Thursday, your press should increase 5lbs. I know your press will plteau quick, so eventually it'll be every 2-3 weeks your presss will increase, but in the meantime focus on better tempo, muscular contraction, maybe even get an extra rep in.

    Start LIGHT. Lets assume your normal bench workout is 185lbs x 5 x 5. Drop the weight to 145lbs and each week add weight. This is going to force your CNS to activate motor units that weren't previously utilized. This will allow the program to work for longer periods and allow you to hit PR's faster.

    Drop the weight, add weight each session. Don't let your ego get in the way.

    I'd also youtube "so you think you can bench?" as well as "so you think you can squat?" Most people need form adjustments.

    Do NOT forget to squat. Squatting will cause ALL your lifts go up. Focus harder on your lower body days as you do on the upper body days. Front squats, cleans, back squats, deadlifts ALL of them will benefit your upper body. If you don't believe me, focus on developing those lifts and you will see.

    Make sure your squats are deep squats utilizing hip extension versus driving your feet into the ground and "leg presses" the weight up. Drive your back into the bar. Ass up, hips forward.

    With deadlifts let the bar roll up and down your legs. You should get a nice line from this.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
  

  
 

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