Regimen for "Gymnast's Physique"?

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    Regimen for "Gymnast's Physique"?


    I've been HST'ing for three cycles now and I have seen some impressive changes in my body. I'm 6'0 and 170 right now.

    I'm trying to get a slim, lean, defined body -- I don't want to look like a bodybuilder but rather a gymnast or a martial arts guy.

    Thus, I'm wondering if HST is the right way to go for this or maybe I should research other methods, such as more isometric-emphasized. Or, should I continue HST but try to shape my growth, such as cutting out bench presses and doing thickening of the back? Any thoughts on how to design a regimen to get a tight, lean, wirey body? Prohormones/Steroids, nutrition, training, etc...

    Thanks

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    I would think the majority of the work you should do is full bodyweight exercises that involve balance.
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    Concetrate on ratios that stimulate sarcoplasmic hypertrophy.
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    alright...will do...uhh...what exactly are you talking about tho?
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    Its a type of training that increases time under tnesion but doens't necessarily stimultate myofibillar growth. Basically a high number of reps performed slowly. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy means (generally) increasing the glycogen capacity that gives you that well defined, long lean, yet muscular look. Your bascially toning without causing too much growth. As size said many full bodyweight exercises can be used because your total time under tension is increased but your doing many reps of a certain exercise withouth using heavy weight.
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    i hate to sound pedantic, or overly simplified, but the answer is clear.

    if you want to look like a gymnast, train like one.

    i mean, duh!

    seriously, some of a "classic gymnast" attributes are genetic. like being short.

    other than that, gymnasts look the way they do because of training. bobo is right in regards to sarcoplasmic (vs. sarcomere) hypetrophy priorities

    i am a big fan of haycock's methodology, but HST is a method designed to maximize hypertrophy (and not as concerned with specific exercises for various ratios of muscle sizes), and not really applicable. it uses a waved rep program, whereas gymnasts basically do several things

    one: explosive movements. useful in various floor movement and the horse, etc.

    long time under tension (as bobo mentioned) when twirling on the horse, the rings, etc.

    bodyweight manipulation, etc.

    also gymnasts, due to the nature of the movements and the fact that they need to manipulate and swing their legs around a lot, try to (consciously or not) minimize leg hypertrophy. non-functional muscle mass in the lower body would be much more detrimental in many movements vs. the same in the upper body, although non-functional muscle mass is to be avoided in general, of course.

    gymnasts are going to be noted for

    1) low bf (weight maintenance is key)
    2) big biceps and lats and shoulders (some pretty phenomenal biceps - not big by BBer standards, but big by layman's standards)
    3) often underdeveloped (relatively speaking, from an aesthetics standpoint) pecs
    4) phenomenal core development. especially notable in obliques. some bbers try not to "overdevelop" the obliques for aesthetic purposes. gymnasts otoh, need exceptionally strong and high-endurance capable cores, and sometimes have exceptionally hypertrophied obliques
    5) minimal leg development, relatively speaking

    i have trained with a gymnast/martial artist turned olympic lifter.

    items of note:

    phenomenal explosiveness
    phenomenal athleticism
    relatively weak legs (compared to the weights he C&J'd) for instance.
    great flexibility (in a test at the mexico city olympic, gymnasts had the best flexibility of all olympic athletes. weightlifters were second)
    exceptional body awareness and very fast skill acquisition

    but to put it simply - if you want to look like a gymnast, train like one
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    Thanks alot for this reply. It gave me much to think about. I am researching sarcoplasmic hypertrophy as we speak. Maybe I will find a regimen focused on time under tension, static holds, etc.

    As for now, I am going to focus on deltoid and lat development. I was thinking about dropping all pec work, then thinking of adding in extremely wide-grip incline presses or a dumbbell pullover. I want to be long, lean, and wide.

    Thanks much! Any other thoughts would be much appreciated. Love this board.


    Quote Originally Posted by jjjd
    i hate to sound pedantic, or overly simplified, but the answer is clear.

    if you want to look like a gymnast, train like one.

    i mean, duh!

    seriously, some of a "classic gymnast" attributes are genetic. like being short.

    other than that, gymnasts look the way they do because of training. bobo is right in regards to sarcoplasmic (vs. sarcomere) hypetrophy priorities

    i am a big fan of haycock's methodology, but HST is a method designed to maximize hypertrophy (and not as concerned with specific exercises for various ratios of muscle sizes), and not really applicable. it uses a waved rep program, whereas gymnasts basically do several things

    one: explosive movements. useful in various floor movement and the horse, etc.

    long time under tension (as bobo mentioned) when twirling on the horse, the rings, etc.

    bodyweight manipulation, etc.

    also gymnasts, due to the nature of the movements and the fact that they need to manipulate and swing their legs around a lot, try to (consciously or not) minimize leg hypertrophy. non-functional muscle mass in the lower body would be much more detrimental in many movements vs. the same in the upper body, although non-functional muscle mass is to be avoided in general, of course.

    gymnasts are going to be noted for

    1) low bf (weight maintenance is key)
    2) big biceps and lats and shoulders (some pretty phenomenal biceps - not big by BBer standards, but big by layman's standards)
    3) often underdeveloped (relatively speaking, from an aesthetics standpoint) pecs
    4) phenomenal core development. especially notable in obliques. some bbers try not to "overdevelop" the obliques for aesthetic purposes. gymnasts otoh, need exceptionally strong and high-endurance capable cores, and sometimes have exceptionally hypertrophied obliques
    5) minimal leg development, relatively speaking

    i have trained with a gymnast/martial artist turned olympic lifter.

    items of note:

    phenomenal explosiveness
    phenomenal athleticism
    relatively weak legs (compared to the weights he C&J'd) for instance.
    great flexibility (in a test at the mexico city olympic, gymnasts had the best flexibility of all olympic athletes. weightlifters were second)
    exceptional body awareness and very fast skill acquisition

    but to put it simply - if you want to look like a gymnast, train like one
  

  
 

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