Bicep training video...

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    Bicep training video...


    YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.

    this guy talks about isolation... which is going against everything ive read which says isolating isnt good if ur trying to get big int he first place

    feel free to correct me but wouldnt it be better not trying to purely isolate it... ie standing BB bicep curls? plus wouldnt u be getting more different muscles working trying to balance the whole workout... and if done correctly u should be targetting the bicep pretty hard and getting it to grow?

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    Most people that I know that hae huge arms...don't use arm exercises directly to get there. They do them for assistance work but for the most part very little emphasis is done on them.
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    There are lifts designed to pack on the mass; those big, heavy compound lifts. But I believe that without isolation work, you're not building a quality physique. What's the point of having big arms if they're not quality arms?

    Don't get me wrong though, you have to build your arms up in mass first before you start concentrating on shape and definition, but that's where isolation work comes into play.

    And if you're into bodybuilding, you should know that while compound lifts may recruit heavily from the arm muscles (triceps are heavily recruited in pressing movements for instance, or biceps in pull-ups), you're still not stimulating as many muscle fibers as you could be. You have to work each muscle at various angles for full development, even if you're just starting out.

    Compound lifts for mass, because you're stimulating so many various groups of muscle fibers, and isolation work to ensure maximum muscle fiber stimulation for every muscle.
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    I am not saying that isolation (or more accurately, assistance) work has no merit, of course it does. But size? Shape? Most people never respond well to these concepts and people can just make their genetic blueprint bigger and not "sculpt" or whatever the magazines are saying these days.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hbs6 View Post
    I am not saying that isolation (or more accurately, assistance) work has no merit, of course it does. But size? Shape? Most people never respond well to these concepts and people can just make their genetic blueprint bigger and not "sculpt" or whatever the magazines are saying these days.
    I don't think you can "sculpt" your muscles, but I do think you can target certain areas of the muscle more so than others. When you do a barbell curl, you're stimulating muscle fibers in the biceps to contract. Well, I do think you can alter the way you do your curls as to stimulate certain muscle fibers more than others. You're working your biceps as a whole no matter what type of curl motion you execute, but I do think it's possible to make certain areas of the biceps contract a little harder than others, and in doing so, you can work different areas of the biceps to a slightly greater degree (even though, like I said, you're always going to be working the biceps as a whole, no matter what type of curl you're executing.)

    So yeah, you can't "sculpt" your muscles into the shape you want; genetics have already determined that. But you can still do certain things, certain techniques, to develop certain areas faster.

    I used to be the guy who said that you can only make your muscles bigger or smaller, and nothing more. But speaking of biceps, I've been training my biceps with different techniques lately and I can already tell my outer biceps are beginning to develop more so than they used to be, and I hadn't gained any significant additional mass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua86 View Post
    I don't think you can "sculpt" your muscles, but I do think you can target certain areas of the muscle more so than others. When you do a barbell curl, you're stimulating muscle fibers in the biceps to contract. Well, I do think you can alter the way you do your curls as to stimulate certain muscle fibers more than others. You're working your biceps as a whole no matter what type of curl motion you execute, but I do think it's possible to make certain areas of the biceps contract a little harder than others, and in doing so, you can work different areas of the biceps to a slightly greater degree (even though, like I said, you're always going to be working the biceps as a whole, no matter what type of curl you're executing.)

    So yeah, you can't "sculpt" your muscles into the shape you want; genetics have already determined that. But you can still do certain things, certain techniques, to develop certain areas faster.

    I used to be the guy who said that you can only make your muscles bigger or smaller, and nothing more. But speaking of biceps, I've been training my biceps with different techniques lately and I can already tell my outer biceps are beginning to develop more so than they used to be, and I hadn't gained any significant additional mass.
    If you wouldn't mind, could you tell me what you've been doing to get those results? I've been doing reverse preachers and hammers more lately, and seen a little results...but not enough
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    Keep in mind that I'm not the guy with genetics on his side. I have wide shoulders, but otherwise a small frame, and every bit of development I have was earned through training and diet. I'm not bragging or anything, but I'm not one of those guys who puts on muscle really easily and then tries to tell hard gainers how it's done.

    Anyway, I train my arms independently at the end of my training week. Throughout the week I've involved my triceps, biceps, and forearms in doing my compound lifts (presses, deadlifts, ect..), but on my last day I like to give them some extra work, which has proved worthwhile over the years, and especially this past half year or so. As I progress in knowledge about training, my training practices become more efficient, therefore I see extra development. I actually weighed more at the end of last summer than I do now (by about 8lbs, staying at about the same leanness), but my arms - especially my upper arms - look more impressive than ever, thanks in part, in my opinion, to how I've been training then as of late.

    So that aside, I'll get into my training routine:

    I'm a big supporter of flexing (isotension) between sets, and after workouts. During my workouts it allows me to keep more blood pumped into my muscles, therefore allowing them to work more efficiently. There's a time and place for stretching (dynamic and static), but flexing is something I don't see a lot of people doing intentionally (as in, other than just wanting to check themselves out in the mirror).
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    Keep in mind that I'm not the guy with genetics on his side. I have wide shoulders, but otherwise a small frame, and every bit of development I have was earned through training and diet. I'm not bragging or anything, but I'm not one of those guys who puts on muscle really easily and then tries to tell hard gainers how it's done.

    Anyway, I train my arms independently at the end of my training week. Throughout the week I've involved my triceps, biceps, and forearms in doing my compound lifts (presses, deadlifts, ect..), but on my last day I like to give them some extra work, which has proved worthwhile over the years, and especially this past half year or so. As I progress in knowledge about training, my training practices become more efficient, therefore I see extra development. I actually weighed more at the end of last summer than I do now (by about 8lbs, staying at about the same leanness), but my arms - especially my upper arms - look more impressive than ever, thanks in part, in my opinion, to how I've been training then as of late.

    So that aside, I'll get into my training practices:

    Flexing and Isotension -
    I'm a big supporter of flexing (isotension) between sets, and after workouts. During my workouts it allows me to keep more blood pumped into my muscles, therefore allowing them to work more efficiently. There's a time and place for stretching (dynamic and static), but flexing is something I don't see a lot of people doing intentionally (as in, other than just wanting to check themselves out in the mirror). So first off, flex your arm muscles! After every set of anything involving the arms specifically, flex them as hard as you can! I'll usually hold these flexes for 10-20 seconds, trying to get as much blood pumped to the muscles as possible, but still allowing them to get a little bit of rest before I jump into my next set. Flexing is a form of isotention exercise, because you are in fact contracting the muscle. One of the great things about flexing is that you can involve muscle fibers that might not have been involved (to a great extent) during your set, so it helps you make sure you're stimulating as many muscle fibers as possible.

    The biceps has two functions: to curl the arm, and to aid in pronating and supinating the wrists (rotating them). Rotate your wrist and you can see that your biceps are contracting to aid in that movement. So I think it makes sense to keep that in mind when you're training. When you flex your biceps, try flexing with the wrists facing different directions (obviously you're limited here). I find that when I flex my biceps and rotate my wrist so that my thumbs are facing away from my arms as far as they'll go (basically I'm saying flex the biceps but rotate the wrist out as far as it'll go), my outer biceps, over time, has begun to stick out more and more, to the point where I can flex in a certain way as to pop that muscle out enough to show definition. I couldn't do this a year ago, when I actually weighed more (staying at about the same leanness). So keeping that function of the biceps in mind, put it into play with your training. After each set of biceps, rotate the wrist all the way in both directions for a few times, then flex them as hard as you can. Also, during dumbbell exercises for the biceps, you can rotate your wrist during the movement. I especially like doing incline curls, and at the top of the movement, flexing the biceps as hard as possible while I try to rotate my wrist outward as much as possible, trying to make the muscle fibers on the outer biceps contract harder than they normally would had I just done a regular curl. I squeeze my biceps as hard as I can for a brief moment at the top of every curl.

    During my last biceps exercise I do static holds on the last set or two. Meaning, I'll do as many regular, full range reps as I can (remember, always go full range of motion, staying as strict as possible, unless otherwise advised), and on my last rep, once I can't do any more full ones, I'll hold the weight at various points, making my biceps contract to their maximum, trying to keep the weight up. This is best done on cable exercises, I think, so I usually end my biceps workout with either cable preacher curls or cable curls.

    And like I said before, after my arms workout, I'll do a lot of flexing and stretching, of course. Even later on in the day I might do a series of stretches and flexes. Sometimes when I'm driving my car, with my free arm, I'll hold a straight arm pose, flexing the triceps and stretching the biceps, then go the opposite way; flexing the biceps and stretching the triceps. After a while, all this flexing helps to bring out more definition, in my opinion (considering your arms are lean enough to show good definition). My arms are by no means shredded, but I have made them more defined lately, just by changing the way I train them.


    My Routine -
    My arms routine varies almost every week, but usually holds the same framework. I always start off with a lift I can use heavy weight on (glose-grip presses for triceps, or barbell curls for bieceps, for instance). I also like using supersets, because it not only lets me reduce my training time, making my training more intense and efficient, but it gives me a great pump! Here's an example of what one of my arms routines might look like:

    Glose-grip Bench Press 3 x 10,8,6
    Curl Bar Curls (using an arm blaster) 3 x 10,8,6
    Superset: DB Kickbacks and Incline DB Curls 3 x 6-8
    Cable Preacher Curls (or Cable Curls) 3 x 10,8,6
    Reverse Pushups 3 x Failure
    Superset: BB Wrist Curls and Reverse DB Wrist Curls 4 x 8-10

    ** Remember, on the last biceps exercise I like to hold the resistance at various points along the path of the movement, making my biceps work as hard as possible. I also do this during my reverse pushups (reverse dips). I also like doing 21s, or variations thereof, on reverse pushups. Sometimes I might do 10 for the bottom half, 10 for the top half, and then 10 full range. I squeeze the triceps at the top of each rep (I usually contact my muscles at the peak of most lifts, to make them contract that much harder).


    So basically my arms training revolves around flexing the crap out of my muscles and trying to work them from as many angles as possible, trying not to leave any muscle fiber behind!

    Do however keep overtraining in mind, being that the arms are subject to a lot of indirect work. If you start to feel like you might be overtraining, then change your workouts accordingly.

    P.S. - FORM IS EVERYTHING!!! One of the biggest mistakes I see is people getting caught up in how much weight they can lift, when they should be thinking about how much weight they can lift while keeping great form. My arms are bigger and look better than a lot of guys in my gym, who are trying to lift heavier weight than I am.

    P.S.S - I just now watched that guy's video and he's got the right idea. However, that last exercise he does, doing the curls seated, really restricts his range of motion, so he's not working the biceps along it's entire range, which is something I feel you should do. This does apparently work for him though! Kind of a weird choice of music, haha!
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    Great info...thanks man. I was flexing between sets a few months ago and the pumps were great. I kinda just forgot about it, time to re-incorporate that.
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