Newbies & Weight Gain

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    Newbies & Weight Gain


    Weight Gain Myths

    The vast majority of myths about weight gain are mostly passed down from "gym talk" and so-called experts who know nothing about the body's workings.

    Myths that lead to wasted time, frustration and if are taken blindly as truth, can really set back your progress in the gym. Don't believe everything you hear in the gym when it comes to exercise and weight gain, do the research yourself.

    Simple, basic principles apply to all weight and muscle gain such as progressive overload, variable frequency of reps and high intensity workouts. Lets take a look at some of the most common weight gain myths.

    High repetitions burn fat while low repetitions build muscle.

    Progressive overload is needed to make muscles bigger. Meaning that you need to perform more reps than you did for your last workout for that particular exercise. If you perform the same amount of reps at each workout nothing will change on you, also if the weight doesn't changes on the bar nothing will change on you. You need to become stronger.

    Definition has two characteristics, muscle size and a low incidence of body fat. To reduce body fat you will have to reduce your calories; the high repetition exercise will burn some calories, but wouldn't it be better to fast walk to burn these off? Better still; use the low reps to build muscle, which will elevate your metabolism and burn more calories (less fat).

    Vegetarians can't build muscle.

    Yes they can! Strength training with supplementation of soy Protein Isolate has shown to increase solid bodyweight. Studies have shown that athletic performance is not impaired by following a meat free diet, and people strength training and consuming only soy protein isolate as a protein source were able to gain lean muscle mass.

    Strength Training will make you look masculine.


    If it is not you're intention to bulk up from strength training you won't. Putting on muscle is a long hard slow process. Your strength-training regime coupled with quality food will determine how much you will bulk up. To bulk up you also require more food. Women don't produce enough testosterone to allow for muscular growth as large as men.

    By working out you can eat what ever you want to.

    Of course you can eat whatever you want, if you don't care how you want to look. Working out does not give you an open license to consume as many calories as you want. Although you will burn more calories if you workout than someone who doesn't, you still need to balance your energy intake with you energy expenditure.

    If you take a week off you will lose most of your gains. Taking one or two weeks off occasionally will not harm your training. By taking this time off every eight to ten weeks in between strength training cycles it has the habit of refreshing you and to heal those small niggling injuries. By having longer layoffs you do not actually lose muscle fibres, just volume through not training, any size loss will be quickly re-gained.

    By eating more protein I can build bigger muscles.

    Building muscle mass involves two things, progressive overload to stimulate muscles beyond their normal levels of resistance and eating more calories than you can burn off. With all the hype about high protein diets lately and because muscle is made of protein, it's easy to believe that protein is the best fuel for building muscle, however muscles work on calories which should predominately be derived from carbohydrates.

    If I'm not sore after a workout, I didn't work out hard enough.

    Post workout soreness is not an indication of how good the exercise or strength training session was for you. The fitter you are at a certain activity, the less soreness you will experience after. As soon as you change an exercise, use a heavier weight or do a few more reps you place extra stress on that body part and this will cause soreness.

    Resistance training doesn't burn fat.

    Nothing could not be further from the truth. Muscle is a metabolically active tissue and has a role in increasing the metabolism. The faster metabolism we have the quicker we can burn fat. Cardio exercise enables us to burn calories whilst exercising but does little else for fat loss afterwards.

    Weight training enables us to burn calories whilst exercising but also helps us to burn calories whilst at rest. Weight training encourages muscle growth and the more lean muscle mass we possess, the more fat we burn though an increased and elevated metabolism.

    No pain no gain.

    This is one myth that hangs on and on. Pain is your body signalling that something is wrong. If you feel real pain during a workout, stop your workout and rest. To develop muscle and increase endurance you may need to have a slight level of discomfort, but that's not actual pain.

    Taking steroids will make me huge.


    Not true, strength training and correct nutrition will grow muscle. Taking steroids without training will not make you muscular.

    Most steroids allow faster muscle growth through greater recovery, while others help increase strength which allows for greater stress to be put onto a muscle. Without food to build the muscle or training to stimulate it nothing will happen. Most of the weight gain seen with the use of some steroids is due to water retention and is not actual muscle.

    Strength training won't work your heart.

    Wrong!! Strength training with short rest periods will increase your heartbeat well over a hundred beats per minute. For example, performing a set of breathing squats and you can be guaranteed that your heart will be working overtime and that your entire cardiovascular system will be given a great overall body workout.

    Any intensive weightlifting routine that lasts for 20 minutes or more is a great workout for your heart and the muscles involved.

    I can gain muscle and lose fat at the same time.

    Wrong. Only a few gifted people with superb genetics can increase muscle size while not putting on body fat. But for the average hard gainer, they have to increase their muscle mass to its maximum potential and then cut down their body fat percentage to achieve the desired shape.


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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyboy9
    No pain no gain.

    This is one myth that hangs on and on. Pain is your body signalling that something is wrong. If you feel real pain during a workout, stop your workout and rest. To develop muscle and increase endurance you may need to have a slight level of discomfort, but that's not actual pain.
    i don't know about you, but when i burn out my biceps with 21's, that is what i would define as pain. the word pain does not always imply injury. then again, every time you do a workout, you are, to some extent, "injuring" the muscle tissue, forcing new tissue to grow.

    aside from that point, a fairly sound post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wandy
    i don't know about you, but when i burn out my biceps with 21's, that is what i would define as pain. the word pain does not always imply injury.
    Quote Originally Posted by dannyboy9

    No pain no gain.

    This is one myth that hangs on and on. Pain is your body signalling that something is wrong. If you feel real pain during a workout, stop your workout and rest. To develop muscle and increase endurance you may need to have a slight level of discomfort, but that's not actual pain.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wandy
    then again, every time you do a workout, you are, to some extent, "injuring" the muscle tissue, forcing new tissue to grow.
    Yeah, I believe the correct term is "tearing down the muscle and building/repairing it back up:

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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyboy9
    Yeah, I believe the correct term is "tearing down the muscle and building/repairing it back up:
    real pain, actual pain.. whatever you want to call it... it's supposed to hurt. if the last few reps of a set don't burn your muscle (i.e. pain) then you wont grow. "no pain no gain" is no myth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyboy9
    [SIZE="3"]
    Wrong. Only a few gifted people with superb genetics can increase muscle size while not putting on body fat. But for the average hard gainer, they have to increase their muscle mass to its maximum potential and then cut down their body fat percentage to achieve the desired shape.
    I disagree with this one. It is not easy, but if you have training and diet down it can be done. Last year, when I cut w/ Bobo (FLA Nutrition) I dropped 14lbs, my arm measurement increased, and I gained strength. That indicates to me that I dropped more than 14lbs, and I gained some LBM, all in 8 weeks. I was only taking protein powder, BCAAs, and vitamins.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beowulf
    I disagree with this one. It is not easy, but if you have training and diet down it can be done. Last year, when I cut w/ Bobo (FLA Nutrition) I dropped 14lbs, my arm measurement increased, and I gained strength. That indicates to me that I dropped more than 14lbs, and I gained some LBM, all in 8 weeks. I was only taking protein powder, BCAAs, and vitamins.
    he is right about that somewhat.. it is very hard to do for the vast majority of people.. from the looks of it i'd guess you have a fast metabolism, and were on a rigorous training regimen. most people with an average metabolism and an average training program couldn't do what you did.

    then again maybe you are one of the few "chosen ones" with gifted genetics.

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    Alright guys....let's not split hairs here.

    Beowulf, you're right. Shedding fat building muscle thing, but like you said, you have to hae your diet & routine down to the teeth and this article is basically geared at newcomers to lifting. I know you can burn fat and build muscle. Would you bother explaining it to a newbie?

    No.

    Why?

    Because we don't need to be filling their brains with complicated little techniques and things they won't remember/understand at the moment. All newbies have to know is:

    EAT

    LIFT

    SLEEP

    REPEAT.

    Simple.

    Pain is an unpleasant sensation occurring in many degrees of severity due to injury, disease, or emotional disorder. It's suffering or stress.

    Do you feel any of that when you workout? I hope not....

    Do you feel the burn? Yes....of course but it doesn't feel like anything that I described up there.

    These are just basics, not specific guidelines

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    I think the key for us non-genetic freaks to gain lean mass and lose fat is getting the exact right balance and taking advantage of our bodys strengths and weaknesses. That would only work up until a point but still, it's possible.

    Because we don't need to be filling their brains with complicated little techniques and things they won't remember/understand at the moment. All newbies have to know is:
    Agreed, there's something about knowing too much that slows a lot of peoples (including myself at times) gains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyboy9
    Pain is an unpleasant sensation occurring in many degrees of severity due to injury, disease, or emotional disorder. It's suffering or stress.

    Do you feel any of that when you workout? I hope not....

    Do you feel the burn? Yes....of course but it doesn't feel like anything that I described up there.
    sure it does. perhaps your workouts arent as strenuous as mine. when i max out on squats, or a heavy set of barbell curls, what i experience can be described as none other than "an unpleasant sensation" occurring due to lactic acid buildup. "many degrees of severity" would also include workout pain, as it is still some degree of pain.. at least among anyone i workout with who is serious about making gains. it sounds like you need to start pushing yourself in the gym a little more. hurt yourself, throw around some heavy weight. the pumped up feeling you get for hours is well worth the few seconds of agony you experience at the end of a set. in the words of arnold: "this is what separates a champion from not a champion" lol.

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    Only pain I get in the gym is through negatives every 3 months or so I do. Other than that just a burn. I did pull my biceps doing heavy rack pulls...That hurt like hell

    Good over all message though Thumbs up

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