Chest bulk workout? - AnabolicMinds.com

Chest bulk workout?

  1. New Member
    BraunBruh's Avatar
    Stats
    6'2"  190 lbs.
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    15
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Chest bulk workout?


    Im 200 pounds 10% body fat
    Everything in size comes pretty natural to me butt chest
    I workouts 6 times a week and i train hard
    I just cant seem to get a defined chest my inner chest is cut but the sides arnt
    Ive been reading up that droimg drop sets like 4 sets 12,10,8,6 reps will do the job.
    what do you guys think i should do.
    when i lift chest this is my workout
    bench press
    incline press
    decline pree
    Cable flys
    Downward flys
    up crunch flys
    I just cant seem to build a big chest though
    Thoughts?

  2. Advanced Member
    toddgranit's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  186 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Age
    48
    Posts
    535
    Rep Power
    48047

    Reputation

    I would switch to dumbbell exercises, and try to increase your reps.
    If you aren't getting results with what your doing don't be afraid to try something different.
    Dips have always worked well for me, however if you are going to try dips make sure to use good form, lean forward, and go as low as you can comfortably go to get a really good stretch.
    Good luck.
  3. New Member
    rebel1130's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    40

    Reputation

    Drop decline...Flat, incline, and cables is all you need. Keep your reps around 12 and record your weight. Make sure you are doing full reps. If you record your weight, do full reps, and push yourself...You should go up each week.
    •   
       

  4. New Member
    Ripley's Avatar
    Stats
    5'4"  155 lbs.
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    35

    Reputation

    Have to agree with Todd.. dips are great for the chest.. slow n low
  5. New Member
    keyup's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  192 lbs.
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    29

    Reputation

    Dips for sure, after you get used to the movement add weight to the exercise by getting a dip belt.
  6. New Member
    gmanall's Avatar
    Stats
    6'5"  187 lbs.
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    262
    Rep Power
    120463

    Reputation Reputation Reputation

    Again dips are great for your chest. Also whats your rep range been? Some people respond better to different rep ranges. You could try high weight/low volume or lower weight/ high volume.
  7. Advanced Member
    toddgranit's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  186 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Age
    48
    Posts
    535
    Rep Power
    48047

    Reputation

    Have to agree with gmanall, play around with volume. Arnold was a big fan of high volume for chest, and people seem to think that he had a pretty good chest.
  8. New Member
    bulk up man's Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  143 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    21
    Rep Power
    73

    Reputation

    In Men's Health magazine a long time ago, it said training the back is the quickest way to add bulk to the chest. It helps activate muscle fibers in the chest and having a big back gives the appearance of having a big chest.
  9. New Member
    Ripley's Avatar
    Stats
    5'4"  155 lbs.
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    35

    Reputation

    Bulk up man has got it right = you must build your back if you want a bigger chest. The chest can't be very strong without an equally strong back. One supports the other and even goes beyond appearance = )
  10. New Member
    Ripley's Avatar
    Stats
    5'4"  155 lbs.
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    35

    Reputation

    The other thing you might try is to do power lifting style bench presses for a couple of months. Completely change the way you train the chest for awhile. I did this recently, training my chest (and back) as if I was a power lifter (bench pressing) and had a huge visible change in my chest, including strength increase.
    good luck!
  11. New Member
    novazw21's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    37

    Reputation

    I'm not really sure what you're looking for. You mentioned size AND definition. These are completely different ideas and therefore require completely different approaches. For size you go high weight-low rep while for definition you go low weight-high rep. Your 12,10,8,6 reps (in my opinion) is completely backwards. Your going up in weight but down in reps and that doesn't make any sense. Try 6, 8, 10, 12 while also going up in weight and I can guarantee you better results. This will allow your muscles to warm up while also increasing difficulty. True growth comes from pushing your limits. This is why I prefer to lift with a partner. It gives you the opportunity to really push your limits and your partner can help you with extra "forced" reps. I don't think anybody even mentioned pushups on this thread... Really? Go primitive. A pushup is probably the most basic compound exercise out there. It will give you that big chest AND big back that brings out your chest. The best part is that you can adapt your pushups to your needs. Try a weight vest or do them with your girlfriend on your back if they're too easy or change the positioning of your hands/elbows to attack different areas. Trust me with the 6, 8, 10, 12 reps while adding weight. Go up if you still have some in the tank or go back down while still increasing reps and you will definitely see a big change in size AND definition.
  12. New Member
    novazw21's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    37

    Reputation

    A lot of guys have mentioned how working on your back brings out your chest but neglected that the same thing applies to working your shoulders and lats. In other words, wider shoulders and lats lead to a wider chest.
  13. Elite Member
    Jiigzz's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  205 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,224
    Rep Power
    3430326

    Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by novazw21 View Post
    I'm not really sure what you're looking for. You mentioned size AND definition. These are completely different ideas and therefore require completely different approaches. For size you go high weight-low rep while for definition you go low weight-high rep. Your 12,10,8,6 reps (in my opinion) is completely backwards. Your going up in weight but down in reps and that doesn't make any sense. Try 6, 8, 10, 12 while also going up in weight and I can guarantee you better results. This will allow your muscles to warm up while also increasing difficulty. True growth comes from pushing your limits. This is why I prefer to lift with a partner. It gives you the opportunity to really push your limits and your partner can help you with extra "forced" reps. I don't think anybody even mentioned pushups on this thread... Really? Go primitive. A pushup is probably the most basic compound exercise out there. It will give you that big chest AND big back that brings out your chest. The best part is that you can adapt your pushups to your needs. Try a weight vest or do them with your girlfriend on your back if they're too easy or change the positioning of your hands/elbows to attack different areas. Trust me with the 6, 8, 10, 12 reps while adding weight. Go up if you still have some in the tank or go back down while still increasing reps and you will definitely see a big change in size AND definition.
    Actually, some people prefer this pyramid scheme as it allows the body time to warm up as well, if you havent adequatly warmed up and start pushing at your maximum, you can tear a tendon or muscle. As for hypertrophy (muscle size) its all about volume. Usually rep ranges are from 6-10 with higher volume of sets and then increasing volume and weight over time (while keeping rep range the same).

    I dont undersatnd your method of increasing weight while increasing sets, in all cases, you should only select the maximum weight that will allow you to complete the prescribed number of reps in that set, so, if you start off with 6 reps, the weight should be heavier than the weight on 12 reps, however you imply the opposite. I can easily push out 6 reps with a light weight which will not be doing anything for placing stress on my muscles.
  14. Registered User
    Iron Warrior's Avatar
    Stats
    6'0"  265 lbs.
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    5,328
    Rep Power
    13068

    Reputation

    Try increasing the time under tension during each set. Also, hitting chest twice a week has helped me break some plateau's.
  15. New Member
    novazw21's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    37

    Reputation

    Jiigzz... In my "pyramid scheme" you use the lighter weights with lighter reps as your warmup while also not risking burning out too early in your workout. You don't burn out as quickly but you still warm up your muscles so you have the opportunity to lift more weight later on. You said my method doesn't allow your muscles to warm up properly and you're at a larger risk of injury. I disagree. My method allows your muscle to warm up slowly while being forced to adapt to heavier weights and more reps. I don't believe in a "prescribed number of reps" as you mentioned because you don't know how far your body will be able to go. The "prescribed number" is only something to base your lifting off of and it sounds like you're on of those people that are afraid of pushing yourself further than a "prescribed number". You sound like one of those people who only works out a predetermined body part on a predetermined day and has "prescribed" off days and things like that. I highly disagree with all of that because you don't know how much your body can handle until you push it. I used to have a schedule and a predetermined workout with a "prescribed number of sets" as you mentioned but I began to realize I still had gas left in the tank and I wasn't reaching my body's full potential. Your body is a beautiful thing because it is always changing and will never be the same way it is right now. You can either go by a "prescription" workout and maybe get a little better or you can go beyond that and push your muscles past their known limits. I like that you disagreed with what I said though because how you lift is really a matter of preference. However, I do recommend you try my method so that you can physically experience the pump and see the results firsthand and then get back to me. You said "Usually rep ranges are from 6-10 with higher volume of sets and then increasing volume and weight over time (while keeping rep range the same)." With that, you completely contradict the low weight-high rep idea that you were supporting... As for "...you can tear a tendon or muscle" you should take the "or muscle" out because that's the whole idea of weightlifting. You tear muscle fibers and force them to rebuild bigger and stronger...

    I guess you could read all of that ^ or you could just read this. Listen to your body. Your body will show you how much it can handle, what it needs, and what it responds to. It's all up to you if you want to follow those "prescribed numbers of reps" and get a little bit better or if you would rather actually push yourself and be the best that you can be. That's what separates the winners from the guys who just go through the motions. You have to call on that will power once in a while and hit your muscles until they can't handle any more. Leave everything in the weight room every time.
  16. Elite Member
    Jiigzz's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  205 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,224
    Rep Power
    3430326

    Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation

    Quote Originally Posted by novazw21 View Post
    Jiigzz... In my "pyramid scheme" you use the lighter weights with lighter reps as your warmup while also not risking burning out too early in your workout. You don't burn out as quickly but you still warm up your muscles so you have the opportunity to lift more weight later on. You said my method doesn't allow your muscles to warm up properly and you're at a larger risk of injury. I disagree. My method allows your muscle to warm up slowly while being forced to adapt to heavier weights and more reps. I don't believe in a "prescribed number of reps" as you mentioned because you don't know how far your body will be able to go. The "prescribed number" is only something to base your lifting off of and it sounds like you're on of those people that are afraid of pushing yourself further than a "prescribed number". You sound like one of those people who only works out a predetermined body part on a predetermined day and has "prescribed" off days and things like that. I highly disagree with all of that because you don't know how much your body can handle until you push it. I used to have a schedule and a predetermined workout with a "prescribed number of sets" as you mentioned but I began to realize I still had gas left in the tank and I wasn't reaching my body's full potential. Your body is a beautiful thing because it is always changing and will never be the same way it is right now. You can either go by a "prescription" workout and maybe get a little better or you can go beyond that and push your muscles past their known limits. I like that you disagreed with what I said though because how you lift is really a matter of preference. However, I do recommend you try my method so that you can physically experience the pump and see the results firsthand and then get back to me. You said "Usually rep ranges are from 6-10 with higher volume of sets and then increasing volume and weight over time (while keeping rep range the same)." With that, you completely contradict the low weight-high rep idea that you were supporting... As for "...you can tear a tendon or muscle" you should take the "or muscle" out because that's the whole idea of weightlifting. You tear muscle fibers and force them to rebuild bigger and stronger...

    I guess you could read all of that ^ or you could just read this. Listen to your body. Your body will show you how much it can handle, what it needs, and what it responds to. It's all up to you if you want to follow those "prescribed numbers of reps" and get a little bit better or if you would rather actually push yourself and be the best that you can be. That's what separates the winners from the guys who just go through the motions. You have to call on that will power once in a while and hit your muscles until they can't handle any more. Leave everything in the weight room every time.
    Firstly, I never said your workout doesnt allow you to warm up properly, never id I say that. Too me, it just didnt make sense. Secondly, I know my body and my limits very well. So well in fact, as im sure others are the same, that I can guess how much weight I can handle for 8 reps. Also, i have prescribed days off to allow my body to recupertate and repair.

    Also, I wasnt supporting a 'low weight, high rep' scheme, I dont know where you got this from?

    Say, for example, I might do 5 sets of 8 reps for a squat and by the end of it, I literally cannot do one more rep, this is how well I know how much I can handle.
  17. Elite Member
    Jiigzz's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  205 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,224
    Rep Power
    3430326

    Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation

    All im saying is, if you are on your maximum weight at 12 reps, then your weight simply isnt heavy enough for me. I like to train until the 8th rep is all I can handle. And also, A muscle TEAR is not ideal. Injuries are not just caused at the tendons but also in the muscle. You do not want a muscle tear
  18. New Member
    novazw21's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    37

    Reputation

    You could strain or pull a muscle through overextension but thats completely different from tearing muscle fibers to build muscle.
    I don't believe you do know your limits because you can push through your pain and get forced reps from where you grow a lot. Yes you do have a predetermined GENETIC limit but I don't think thats what you're talking about. We can both agree that how you lift is a matter of preference and if your eighth rep is all you can handle, then good for you.
    If your predetermined off days work for you, then thats fantastic but I was saying that if you don't really need that rest period and your body could handle more, then you should listen to your body instead of taking unnecessary rest periods.
    It's your body and you can do what you want with it. If you respond better to your methods, stick with them.
  19. Elite Member
    Jiigzz's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  205 lbs.
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,224
    Rep Power
    3430326

    Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation Reputation

    You can tear muscles, as in the entire muscle cell. In which I have done and it put it out of exercise for 6 weeks. Also, when training for muscular hpertrophy, it has been proven (through countless research and studies) thatrep ranges and set volumes and extrmely important. Simply put, a persons 1RM weight is alot higher than the same persons 12RM.

    In terms of exercise programs, if yours works for you then fine, stick to it.
    However the pyramid scheme he sugessted, along with the opposite, starting heavy then going light are the two most common forms of pyramid plans. the heavier the weight, the less reps you should perform.

    M.ExPhys
  20. New Member
    kawanakid's Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  74k lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    34
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    @toddgranit. Are you talking like a tri dip mate? If not, then what do you mean?
  21. Advanced Member
    toddgranit's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  186 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Age
    48
    Posts
    535
    Rep Power
    48047

    Reputation

    Kawanakid, no I'm talking about traditional dips, using a slow controlled descent, make sure you get a really good stretch at the bottom of the movement.
    When done correctly it is a fantastic overall upper body movement and really works well at developing the chest.
  22. New Member
    novazw21's Avatar
    Stats
    6'1"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    37

    Reputation

    I don't know how many people actually read the articles on this website but the "Simple Workout Tips" article by Mike Robertson of T-Nation addresses a "planned deload week." This is a direct quote from the article:
    "1. Use a planned deload week
    This is an argument that never seems to go away. One guy swears he needs to deload every fourth or sixth week. Another says he never takes planned deloads and just "listens to his body."

    Here's what I've found: The guy that takes a planned deload tends to see longer and more consistent gains. He's banged up less often, and as a whole, enjoys lifting more.

    The other guy, however, tends to push and push until he ends up injured. This leads to an unplanned deload week, when his body has finally had enough and tells him he has to take a break or risk serious injury.

    Which guy would you rather be?"
    I recognize and respect him as an experienced lifter and trainer so this completely washes away my argument of not taking planned rest periods....

    So as I said, how you lift is a matter of preference and everyone has a different body so stick with what you trust and respond to.
  23. New Member
    kawanakid's Avatar
    Stats
    5'9"  74k lbs.
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    34
    Rep Power
    0

    Reputation

    Toddgranit, I just googled traditional dips. I always thought that was a triceps move, but going nice and deep it would smash the chest. I'll add that in my routine. Thanks mate.
  24. Advanced Member
    MadmanMike's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  185 lbs.
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    618
    Rep Power
    77120

    Reputation Reputation

    I've always been a fan of wide grip bench press negatives, make the weight heavy, where you can only complete 3 reps, and have a spotter lift the weight up for you and bring the weight down as slow as possible in a controlled manner, 2 or 3 negatives should do it!! dont hurt yourself though, also you might be overtraining your chest, everyone is different but l benefit best from just flat and incline, oh yeah chest dips kick but too, the negatives should have you sore for a week if you do it right, dont train until you heal completely, hope this helps and good luck.
  25. New Member
    inda11's Avatar
    Stats
    5'11"  80 lbs.
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    130
    Rep Power
    6528

    Reputation

    Add dumbbell pull over. Its primary a lat movement but expands your rib cage giving your chest a gorilla look!
  26. Senior Member
    TheMeatus101's Avatar
    Stats
    6'2"  240 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,229
    Rep Power
    7268

    Reputation

    So you're going for a "big" chest right? I would def do higher weight lower reps. Just play with it until you start seeing some progress.
    Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free.
    -Jim Morrison
  27. New Member
    shockingfit's Avatar
    Stats
    5'10"  181 lbs.
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    12
    Rep Power
    35

    Reputation

    chest can be very hard to build up. I had problems similar problems, took me almost a full year to find out what works best for me!

    Here is what I've personally tried with no results: super sets, pre-exhaust, post-exhaust, lower weight with strict form, forced negatives, drop sets and probably every weird chest exercise I would get from some "guru" on youtube or forums..

    It was only when I switched back to the basics that my chest responded the best, started working somewhere between 5-8 reps and ultra heavy, even if i have to sacrifice a bit form the heavier I lift the better results I see. It's a simple progression model, with strength increase comes size.

    My current routine: incline barbell bench press > flat barbell bench press > decline barbell bench press > weighted gironda dips > Incline Dumbbell Flys and last high-low cable cross.

    Note: Sometimes I'll switch the last exercise with dumbbell pullover on decline bench and I switch incline flys with flat bench fly.

    I hope my experience helps you, what I realized sometimes sticking to the basic stuff and improving just works the best. I know some people say that some are able to lift 120kg on bench press and still have a small chest. To be honest in 5 years I haven't met someone who can lift 120kg 8 times decent form with undeveloped pecs.

    Peace
    "Train like God is watching. Never quit!"
  

  
 

Similar Forum Threads

  1. My new chest workout
    By Tboz in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-19-2012, 07:37 PM
  2. Looking for new chest workout
    By Tboz in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-09-2012, 07:10 PM
  3. Need help with a Chest workout.
    By steviestv8 in forum Workout Logs
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-22-2009, 01:56 AM
  4. Chest workout
    By East1600Plus in forum Exercise Science
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-10-2006, 09:57 PM
  5. Need some help with my chest workout.
    By ArnoldIsMyIdol in forum Exercise Science
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-27-2006, 04:00 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Log in
Log in