Off topic: Common chemical causing obesity?

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    Off topic: Common chemical causing obesity?


    I read something similar elsewhere, but this was released a few days back. Enough to make you wonder..............



    Are Common Chemicals Feeding Obesity Epidemic?

    By Amanda Gardner
    HealthDay Reporter
    HealthDay Reporter
    posted: 15 March 2007
    01:30 pm ET



    (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to a class of chemicals commonly found in soap and plastics could be fueling the obesity epidemic by contributing to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance in men, a new study suggests.

    The chemicals, known as phthalates, have already been implicated in male reproductive problems including low sperm counts and low testosterone levels. However, it's too soon to know whether they are actually causing these health problems, cautioned the researchers and others.

    "It's premature for folks to be alarmed," said study author Dr. Richard Stahlhut, a resident in preventive medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry in New York.. "What is more alarming is the reason we are doing studies like this. Another study showed that testosterone levels had dropped about 22 percent in men, and that sperm counts had dropped to levels that are considered subfertile or infertile."

    "It's an important observation that chemical exposures could be contributing to obesity and diabetes in the general population," added Dr. Ted Schettler, science director for the Science and Environmental Health Network. "This is one more example of a family of chemicals that may be contributing to this problem, but this study has obvious limits that the authors acknowledge in great detail."

    The study was published in the March 14 online edition of Environmental Health Perspectives.

    Phthalates have been widely used for more than half a century in everything from paint to time-released medicines, but only recently have they become a topic of concern. Animal studies show that phthalates decrease testosterone levels while human studies have found that phthalates are associated with poor sperm quality in men.

    This study follows up on other studies that correlated abnormal sperm counts and low testosterone levels with phthalates. Men with low testosterone levels develop abdominal obesity and insulin resistance, so these authors speculated that phthalates might be behind the depressed testosterone levels.

    "That's the missing link, testosterone as a [possible] link between phthalates and obesity," Stahlhut said.

    Stahlhut and his team analyzed urine, blood samples and other data collected for the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES), a large government survey, from 1999 to 2002.

    Of the adult men available, 1,451 had data on phthalate exposures, obesity and waist circumference. Of these, 651 also had data on fasting glucose and insulin levels needed to calculate insulin resistance.

    According to the analysis, more than 75 percent of the U.S. population has measurable levels of several phthalates detectable in their urine.

    Men with the highest levels of phthalates in their urine had more belly fat and insulin resistance, even after adjusting for other factors.

    One drawback of the data, and therefore of the study, is that no information on hormone levels was available, nor was there any long-term data.

    In any event, phthalates are unlikely to be the whole story. The chemicals have been shown, in animal studies, to have an effect on thyroid hormone, which could also be a pathway to increased obesity.

    "This is just part of the search for answers," Stahlhut said. "The thing we're certain of is not that phthalates are doing this, but that phthalates require very careful scrutiny. I'm certain that the declines in testosterone and sperm production require urgent investigation, and I'm certain that phthalates are on the list of chemicals that could be part of the issue."

    "It's a complex, multi-factorial problem," Schettler added. "What the authors are suggesting is that a chemical exposure may be one among many factors. The study is certainly hypothesis-generating. It clearly makes a case that this potential link ought to be studied in more detail in more systematic ways."
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    Have you read "Natural Cures" by Kevin Trudeau? Pretty interesting read- he basically says that everything we eat and drink that is man-made causes obesity. Some of the stuff seems to be a little "crack-potish," but other things are pretty interesting and do have at least some truth to them
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    A decrease in overall testosterone levels among the population as a whole seems very possible to me........ just look at all the guys wearing Crocs (Poorly disguised cheapshot at my boy Buff)
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    HAHAHA that must be why i am obese, low test levels hmmm...(calling up the doc.) hahaha


    Good one LANBANE!!! here izza: enjoy!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanbane View Post
    A decrease in overall testosterone levels among the population as a whole seems very possible to me........ just look at all the guys wearing Crocs (Poorly disguised cheapshot at my boy Buff)
    ha-ha Found this for some reading material:

    Environmental Estrogens

    Estrogens are female sex hormones. Natural estrogens are responsible for female sexual development and play an essential role in fertility, pregnancy, and lactation. However, in both males and females excess estrogens can cause birth defects, abnormal sexual development, problems with the nervous system, the immune system, and cancer.

    Many synthetic chemicals that also mimic estrogen are commercially manufactured for a specific purpose or produced as a byproduct, often as pharmaceuticals and contraceptives. The concern arises from the fact that, surprisingly, a number of synthetic chemicals (even some that do not closely resemble the structure of natural estrogens) have estrogen-like activity in animals, including humans. In some cases, these chemicals imitate estrogen in the body, but estrogen-like activity can also result from interference with the action or production of the natural hormones.

    Environmental estrogens are the most studied of all the endocrine disruptors. The endocrine system is the network of glands and organs that maintain hormone balance. Natural compounds capable of producing estrogenic responses, such as the phytoestrogens, occur in a variety of plants and fungi, in addition to the synthetic chemicals that mimic estrogen.

    Exposure to these substances occurs throughout our lives from food, air, water, soil, household products and probably through breast milk and during development in our mother's womb. The human health risks that may be associated with these low-level yet constant exposures are still largely unknown and highly controversial.

    Some, called phytoestrogens, occur naturally in plants such as clover, soybeans and other legumes, whole grains and many fruits and vegetables. Others are synthetic chemicals made commercially for a specific purpose or produced as a byproduct of manufacturing processes.

    Humans and other animals have a long history with phytoestrogens but a very short one with human-made environmental estrogens. Since the turn of the century, manufacture and use of synthetic chemicals has rapidly increased. So too has our exposure to them. These estrogenic chemicals, which differ from phytoestrogens in many ways, are found in:

    * pesticides (insecticides such as o,p'-DDT, endosulfan, dieldrin, methoxychlor, kepone, dicofol, toxaphene, chlordane; herbicides such as alachlor, atrazine and nitrofen; fungicides such as benomyl, mancozeb and tributyl tin; nematocides such as aldicarb adn dibromochloropropane)
    * products associated with plastics (bisphenol A, phthalates)
    * pharmaceuticals (drug estrogens - birth control pills, DES, cimetidine)
    * ordinary household products (breakdown products of detergents and associated surfactants, including nonylphenol and octylphenol)
    * industrial chemicals (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxin and benzo(a)pyrene)
    * heavy metals (lead, mercury, and cadmium)

    Some scientists are concerned that average exposure to environmental levels of these kinds of chemicals may be sufficient to affect human health. However, some of these chemicals are used industrially. Workers in these industries are likely to have exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals at levels far greater than the average.

    Several scientists at UC Davis' Center for Environmental Health Studies are currently examining the effects of environmental estrogens on reproduction, development, and overall health, since pesticide use is a major factor in the economy of California's central valley.

    Sources:
    http://www.cep.ca/en/health/estrogen.html
    e.hormone | hormones and the environment

    Back to CEHS website:
    http://www.envtox.ucdavis.edu/CEHS/Index.htm
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    Kind of worrisome in a way, b/c this is stuff we come into contact with on a daily basis. Also no long term studies to prove/disprove effects on humans
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    Buff, that pizza is what got me in the shape I am in right now! Battling my way back though...... your contest pics were inspirational!
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    Thanks Lanbane haha you should see the before pics haha they are BAD!!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by rms80 View Post
    ...* products associated with plastics (bisphenol A, phthalates)
    ....
    http://www.envtox.ucdavis.edu/CEHS/Index.htm
    I have heard this come up a few times in the past few years...I seem to recall something about microwaving foods in plastic containers too (or maybe just the plastic containers that foods come in)...It was a while ago though, so I can't remember the specifics. Does anybody else remember this?
    RcB Since 09-06-2011 20:55 EST, Post 49
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    No doubt about it, these chemicals are highly toxic and detrimental to the hormonal system. Things like pthalates, teflon, PVC... the list goes on and and. Essentially, we've surrounded ourselves with highly toxic substances and designed a "life" that depends on them.

    All I can say is: good luck to the human race 'cause I don't think you're gonna last much longer (not at this rate).
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    Quote Originally Posted by stxnas View Post
    I have heard this come up a few times in the past few years...I seem to recall something about microwaving foods in plastic containers too (or maybe just the plastic containers that foods come in)...It was a while ago though, so I can't remember the specifics. Does anybody else remember this?
    I have heard that plastic containers heated in microwaves can release dioxin (a very toxic gas)- not very sure about the accuracy of this, but plastics are made of numerous petroleum-based byproducts/toxins, and heat can effect the chemical composition of anything, so it is really not that far-fetched- do you think that manufacturers would tell us if it was true? (think: smoking)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aeternitatis View Post
    No doubt about it, these chemicals are highly toxic and detrimental to the hormonal system. Things like pthalates, teflon, PVC... the list goes on and and. Essentially, we've surrounded ourselves with highly toxic substances and designed a "life" that depends on them.

    All I can say is: good luck to the human race 'cause I don't think you're gonna last much longer (not at this rate).
    Agreed- we are surrounded by things of this nature- and there is really no place you can go in the United States (or most developed countries for that matter) to avoid it.

    Aeternitis, have you seen "The Inconvenient Truth"? That movie was probably the biggest eye-opener for me- that and several books I have read
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    Quote Originally Posted by rms80 View Post
    I have heard that plastic containers heated in microwaves can release dioxin (a very toxic gas)- not very sure about the accuracy of this, but plastics are made of numerous petroleum-based byproducts/toxins, and heat can effect the chemical composition of anything, so it is really not that far-fetched- do you think that manufacturers would tell us if it was true? (think: smoking)
    PVC releases dioxin and other toxic gases as part of its "natural life". So, that means, your shower curtain, toothpaste tubes, children's toys, vinyl siding/upholstery, and of course PVC pipes.
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    All that, and then factor in chlorine/chloramine in our water (low dose or not... it's over the course of a lifetime), and preservatives in processed food.

    On a similar note, but at the same time an opposite: Look at half the supplements on the market that people are willingly ingesting! LOL
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