Denatured protein at high heat?

  1. Denatured protein at high heat?


    Doesnt heating the pancakes, chips and cookies denature its protein? Isnt this a bad thing? Thanks for answering.


  2. From everything I've read in the past concerning cooked whey, unless you burn them pretty good, the amount lost is very small.

  3. Correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't our body denature proteins during digestion in order to utilize amino acids?
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  4. Quote Originally Posted by Madevilz View Post
    Doesnt heating the pancakes, chips and cookies denature its protein? Isnt this a bad thing? Thanks for answering.
    Heat denatures proteins which means it changes the shapes of the proteins. For example, cooking changes the shapes of the proteins in an egg when you cook the egg, Denaturing the proteins in the egg changes the texture from slimy to firm. Cooking changes the shape of proteins, but cooking doesn't take away the amino acids found in those proteins. Baking will not ruin your protein.

    Or think of it this way we would all be destroying the chicken, meat, eggs and fish we cook


    CROWLER

  5. Quote Originally Posted by CROWLER View Post
    Or think of it this way we would all be destroying the chicken, meat, eggs and fish we cook


    CROWLER
    But is protein from whey and protein from real food a fair comparison?

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Madevilz View Post
    But is protein from whey and protein from real food a fair comparison?
    Is whey protein fake food? Last I checked it's just been chemically separated from milk. If we really wanted to, we could chemically separate protein from chicken fish beef and eggs as well.
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  7. Quote Originally Posted by Madevilz View Post
    But is protein from whey and protein from real food a fair comparison?
    Hello Mad,

    Thank you for the opportunity to address this again. It is FINE to cook/heat protein powder as you can see below.

    Here you go and if you have any more questions just let us know.

    Does cooking affect whey protein?

    Cooking with protein - DiscussBodybuilding.com

    Protein & Amino Acids- Ask the Dietitian


    CROWLER

  8. thanks for your answer, I appreciate it

  9. Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    Is whey protein fake food? Last I checked it's just been chemically separated from milk. If we really wanted to, we could chemically separate protein from chicken fish beef and eggs as well.
    I can't wait for ON's 100% Bovine or 100% Poultry!

    hmmm... bovine - whey, poultry - egg? DAMNIT! I'm too late!

  10. Quote Originally Posted by ShakesAllDay View Post
    I can't wait for ON's 100% Bovine or 100% Poultry!

    hmmm... bovine - whey, poultry - egg? DAMNIT! I'm too late!
    They actually make bovine protein. It is by far the most cost-ineffective protein on the market. I'm still holding out for the 100% trout protein
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  11. Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    Correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't our body denature proteins during digestion in order to utilize amino acids?
    I'm pretty new to this, but I don't think that's quite the case. Denaturation is not strong enough to break the peptide bonds of proteins, but does change the shape of the protein's structure.

    I believe that hydrolysis is utilized to break down proteins from their higher structures to lower structures that can be utilized by the body. This is the science behind hydrolyzed whey that allows for quicker absorption. Hydrolyzed whey is in essence, partially digested...

    Like I said, this is new to me, so feel free to add on/correct anything.
    RcB Since 09-06-2011 20:55 EST, Post 49

  12. Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    Correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't our body denature proteins during digestion in order to utilize amino acids?
    You are correct. Cooking will cause the proteins bind/coil tightly not allowing stomach acids to denature them and therefore inhibiting their digestion.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC

  13. Wait, I'm confused now...who's right?

    Denaturation doesn't break proteins down, it simply changes its structure (which dictates its function). Denaturation doesn't effect primary structure though and is also reversible if it's not to an extreme.

    I'm not trying to argue, I'm trying to clarify what was said...I've read many of your posts Jonny and you definitely know more about bio & chem than I do.
    RcB Since 09-06-2011 20:55 EST, Post 49

  14. I'll try to break it down for you.

    Stomach acids denature (unwind proteins) which allows for more surface area. Stomach Enzymes (pepsin) begin breaking large proteins down into smaller peptides. Then hit the dueodenum where CCK triggers release of pancreatic enzymes that further break the peptides to di & tri-peptides. Then brush-border Di & tri-peptidases do the rest of the work.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC

  15. So is the denaturation actually doing the breaking down of the protein or does it contribute to it? Was I way off about the hydrolysis then?
    RcB Since 09-06-2011 20:55 EST, Post 49

  16. Quote Originally Posted by jonny21 View Post
    You are correct. Cooking will cause the proteins bind/coil tightly not allowing stomach acids to denature them and therefore inhibiting their digestion.
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny21
    Stomach acids denature (unwind proteins) which allows for more surface area. Stomach Enzymes (pepsin) begin breaking large proteins down into smaller peptides. Then hit the dueodenum where CCK triggers release of pancreatic enzymes that further break the peptides to di & tri-peptides. Then brush-border Di & tri-peptidases do the rest of the work.
    So what you're getting at, is that cooking it is sort of like taking a step backwards, right?

    Are we overanalyzing this? Meaning, do you think it's really going to make any noticeable difference when we cook them?
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  17. Quote Originally Posted by stxnas View Post
    So is the denaturation actually doing the breaking down of the protein or does it contribute to it? Was I way off about the hydrolysis then?
    Contributes. Hydrolysis involves water. It breaks the peptide links allowing proteins to be more easily digested.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC

  18. Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    So what you're getting at, is that cooking it is sort of like taking a step backwards, right?

    Are we overanalyzing this? Meaning, do you think it's really going to make any noticeable difference when we cook them?
    Overcooking or too high temperature. That is why it is important to avoid boiling meats & eggs. Best wat to hardboil an egg is to place eggs in water, apply heat, bring to simmer/boil and cover & remove from heat. Let stand for ~18-20minutes and your done.
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC

  19. Quote Originally Posted by jonny21 View Post
    Contributes. Hydrolysis involves water. It breaks the peptide links allowing proteins to be more easily digested.
    Right, I just wasn't sure how stomach acid and bile came into play along with the hydrolysis...

    ...thanks for the clarification! Almost everything that I know about this right now is self learned, but I will be taking classes in the near future. I'm actually excited about that
    RcB Since 09-06-2011 20:55 EST, Post 49

  20. Quote Originally Posted by stxnas View Post
    Right, I just wasn't sure how stomach acid and bile came into play along with the hydrolysis...
    Bile plays a role in lipid emulsification and absorption not with protein digestion.

    Most hydrolyzed protein powders have been processed with enzymes to break down polypetides to shorter more easily digested peptides
    Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for life. Lao Tse 6th century BC

  21. Cool. Thanks again Jonny. This kind of stuff really intrigues me!
    RcB Since 09-06-2011 20:55 EST, Post 49
  

  
 

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