Chronic tendonitis/tendonisis in forearm

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    Unhappy Chronic tendonitis/tendonisis in forearm


    I am 41 and have been dealing w/ chronic tendonitis/tendonisis in my forearms (mostly the r. one) for the past 8 months. It kept me out of the gym for about 6 months while I did P/T, Active Release Therapy, took Bulk Cissus, Celadrin, stretching, failed attempt at getting Oratropin, etc. Now I am back in the gym and it seems to be acting up again. I have made adjustments in my training ie: form, grip, exercises, etc. I have thought of many possible causes (ie: age and have to deal with it, test too low or hormonal imbalance?, wrong style training (5x5 too heavy a load) maybe I should be doing HST for example with less volume. Can't figure it out though. Anyone else dealing with this problem found an effective way to deal with it? I don't want to be out of the gym again. Any ideas would be appreciated.

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    Get Cissus


    I here it works on tendonitis , it it's very good for joints. I had a wrist injury from lifting a while ago and now it's almost completely gone.

    I bought Primaforce Cissus.

    Hope it helps.

    But you are already taking some cissus....

    I'm sure more people will be able to help you in this forum.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoPollo View Post
    I here it works on tendonitis , it it's very good for joints. I had a wrist injury from lifting a while ago and now it's almost completely gone.

    I bought Primaforce Cissus.

    Hope it helps.

    But you are already taking some cissus....

    I'm sure more people will be able to help you in this forum.
    Thanks for the reply. Yeah, I am currently taking Bulk Cissus, CEE, L-Glutamine, Powerfull, BCAA's, Fish Oils and as well as Glucosamine and MSM. Maybe a better question would be how have people found ways to work around this issue. Specifically what routines have worked for you. For example I have been doing db bench w/ neutral grip as this is easier on the forearms, I have been doing rows w/ underhand (palms away) rather than overhand grip as this is less stressful for me on the forearms. Pullups are out of the question, I think chinups (palms facing me) is easier but probably should avoid these. How have people still managed to get their arm/shoulder work in w/ this ailment. I was out 6 mnths and I am not doing this again. Sorry to ramble. Thanks for any help.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glipp View Post
    I am 41 and have been dealing w/ chronic tendonitis/tendonisis in my forearms (mostly the r. one) for the past 8 months. It kept me out of the gym for about 6 months while I did P/T, Active Release Therapy, took Bulk Cissus, Celadrin, stretching, failed attempt at getting Oratropin, etc. Now I am back in the gym and it seems to be acting up again. I have made adjustments in my training ie: form, grip, exercises, etc. I have thought of many possible causes (ie: age and have to deal with it, test too low or hormonal imbalance?, wrong style training (5x5 too heavy a load) maybe I should be doing HST for example with less volume. Can't figure it out though. Anyone else dealing with this problem found an effective way to deal with it? I don't want to be out of the gym again. Any ideas would be appreciated.
    WOW I feel for you! I spent over a year going back and forth to doctors and P/T and nothing worked. I finally did the research and realised the Tendinosis is a condition in where small tears in the tendon cause pain. It is often mistreated as Tendinitis but the treatment is different. For Tendinitis the treatment is rest but Tendinosis the treatment is P/T. All I can tell you is what worked for me, I did light forarm work and used a band for the arm called Band-It google it and Tendinosis and you will learn more.
    Good luck
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    I've had tendonitis in my elbows for the last 8 months, primarily my left elbow. The doctor said that the generic "tennis elbow" is the tendons on the head of the outside of the elbow, and what they call "golfer's elbow" is on the inside. The inside thing is a *****, makes me see stars when I do something wrong. I tried taking time off from lifting too. I've found that I do a combination of resting when it flares (worse than usual, its always there) and not doing lifts that aggravate it. For instance, no way can I do regular curls. But I can to reverse grip curls without pain. Pull ups are a bear too, I try to find other things like db rows instead. Oh, and I did a course of prednisolone (sp?) that was great, but the doctor won't keep prescribing it. He still wants me to take several months off of lifting. Not going to happen...
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    Try looking up prolotherapy, it did a lot of good for me. Also, do some reading on IGF-1.
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    I've gotten the same thing usually from pushing too much weight on reverse grip forearm curls, pull-ups, and reverse grip rows. I acutually have it now & was thinking to myself the same questions. I'm going to lay off the reverse grip movements & pullups plus go lighter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glipp View Post
    I am 41 and have been dealing w/ chronic tendonitis/tendonisis in my forearms (mostly the r. one) for the past 8 months. It kept me out of the gym for about 6 months while I did P/T, Active Release Therapy, took Bulk Cissus, Celadrin, stretching, failed attempt at getting Oratropin, etc. Now I am back in the gym and it seems to be acting up again. I have made adjustments in my training ie: form, grip, exercises, etc. I have thought of many possible causes (ie: age and have to deal with it, test too low or hormonal imbalance?, wrong style training (5x5 too heavy a load) maybe I should be doing HST for example with less volume. Can't figure it out though. Anyone else dealing with this problem found an effective way to deal with it? I don't want to be out of the gym again. Any ideas would be appreciated.
    It sounds like youíre taking the right sups (Cissus, BCAA's, Fish Oils and as well as Glucosamine), but I would definitely add Chondroitin, get a Glucosamine/chondroitin sup. Iíve tried going w/o Chondroitin but it didnít do me any good. Iíve never used MSM but some swear by it. Under normal circumstances, I donít feel the need to do Cissus with the Glucosamine/chondroitin, but Iíd leave it in until things clear up.

    IMO, you should avoid any analgesics before a work out, they mask the pain you need to avoid. For me, to get rid of tendonitis I have to never, ever, aggravate the area. For this reason you should avoid Cissus before a wo. I think Cissus has some analgesic properties. The other thing I have to do is work the area with high reps (10 to 15). I think the high reps work the muscle without much stress on the tendon. Donít try to work thru the pain, if it hurts that much youíre going too heavy. In my experience 6 weeks of this usually works. Be careful, one screw up and the 6 weeks start over again.

    If you stick to the plan above, it doesnít matter what exercises you choose. As I can tell you found out, sometimes all you need to do is vary the angle a little. Things like pull-ups donít work very well, because itís hard to do them with high reps.

    To avoid tendonitis Iíve increased my reps. For benches, squats, and deads I still do a rep range of about 4-15, but for most other exercises I keep the rep range of 8-12 instead of the 6-10 I used to do. Iíve been doing that for about 6 years and can only remember a couple instances of tendonitis. One was attributable to not being careful, the other Iím not sure how it happened. You didn't specify how many sets you're doing, but a good rule of thumb is for the large muscle groups like chest, I do about 12 sets, for the smaller like bi's or shoulders 8-10 sets.

    Everyoneís different, but Iím inclined not to attribute your problem to being 41, Iím 53.
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    Just to check back in on this thread, thanks for the replies everyone. Thought I would share an article that I found helpful and I will be incorporating into my training. Still trying to get a handle on exactly how I will use it ie: which exercises, etc. Sorry for the length of the article. Anyway here it is:

    This may be the single most important article you will ever read. You are very likely to develop a tendon problem if you lift weights. You currently are more likely to be diagnosed wrong by a physician about that tendon problem. Your whole lifting career can be ended because of an improper treatment plan. ARE YOU WILLNG TO TAKE THAT RISK?

    The tendon is a very dense/fibrous tissue that is formed from the connective tissue of the muscle. It allows for a very sturdy attachment to the bone. It is this tough nature that brings about an obvious problem. It heals very slowly once it is injured. If you rupture it, surgery is your only option.

    If you have had tendon pain for a period of time longer than two weeks, you should be very aware that it is not likely tendonitis. That's right; your doctor may have told you for the past two years that your problem is an inflammatory condition requiring you to take NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) like they are candy to a child on Halloween.

    You can be doing even more damage by following that dangerous course of treatment. Dangerous? Yes, because not only are you causing more injury to the injured tendon, the fact is that over 16,000 people die every year from taking Advil, Aleve, Nuprin, Aspirin, etc. They eat away at your stomach and your lining of your heart and kill you.

    Now we have your attention!


    Tendonitis Vs. Tendonosis

    Tendonitis is actually very rare; the tendon is more likely to have a condition known as tendonosis. It may look like the same word, but it is very different and if you are confused at this point, then you understand why most doctors are lost too.

    Tendonosis is a degenerative condition that is treated completely different from its inflammatory misnomer, tendonitis. The -itis is a suffix that means inflammation. We could go on about this all day- Take a look at the table below to grasp a comparison of the two conditions.

    Table 1. Comparing Tendonosis To Tendonitis
    Tendonosis Tendonitis
    Very Common; Very Rare
    Requires months/years to heal; Requires only 14 days to heal
    Treated with therapeutic exercise; Aggravated by exercise
    Irritated by NSAIDs; Helped by NSAIDs
    Shows up Black on a MRI (T1); Shows up White on an MRI
    Degenerative; Inflammatory
    Usually feels better after proper training; Hurts to move at all
    Responds to Electric stimulation and heat; Irritated by heat
    Irritated by Ice and rest; Loves rest and ice
    Helped by friction massage; No friction massage
    Most not helped by surgery; No help from surgery
    Usually cool to touch; Usually warm to touch

    Nutritionally
    Specifically proanthocyanidins (grape seed) that have been suggested to prevent activation of metalloproteases, decrease free-radical production and stabilize proteins. There hasn't been much work done in humans with proanthocyanidins so there isn't much out there. I'm thinking about 500 - 1000 mg/d to begin. Most of the capsules contain about 100 mg (Nature's Way).


    Training For Treatment

    Consider using this approach only after confirming your proper diagnosis with your doctor. Tendon Pathology includes but is not limited to: tendonosis/ tendinopathy, tenosynovitis and peritendonosis, partial and complete tears, subluxation and dislocation, and entrapment. The proper diagnosis is critical to determine your treatment success.

    The treatment for tendonosis requires a varied step approach.


    First:

    Find what area of the movement is affected by pain. Typically tendonosis does not limit your range of motion, except with pain. This means that if your lifting buddy can gently move the joint, then it shouldn't hurt as bad, as long are you are relaxed. You must find out what movement causes you pain.


    Second:

    This is to warm-up. We are going to work on the area where the movement doesn't hurt. Now let's say that the painful part of the curl is the part at the very bottom or the bench hurts when the bar is close to your chest.

    You should warm-up using less weight (less than 20% of max). Perform 30-40 reps with a slow speed. If it hurts to move anything, use Isometric contractions and use six different positions in the range of motion, for 6 seconds at 60% of your max for squeezing the muscle, then repeat it 6 times.

    Third:

    Please note; that this part is likely to cause pain, but not more than 60% or a 6/10. Ten is like Emergency room pain. Using the lighter weight still, enter into that painful range of motion. Do 30-40 reps with a slow speed. Do only one set the first day. Two the next and three the following and then move to the next step.


    Fourth:

    Instead of lifting more weight, try to move the weight faster. You might need to alter your lifting style here and go to using bands. Day one; do the movement for 30-40 seconds, day two do 50-60 seconds. Over the course of the next couple of days use a friend to count the number of movements. Try to move faster and faster, until you are moving stupid fast.

    Training the knees and shoulders might require special machines known as: Orthotrons, available at your local physical therapist, some chiropractic offices and some other specialty physician's clinics.


    Fifth:

    The next step is to slow down the movement again by 50% and increase the weight by 1-10%. Again, keep in mind that maximum pain is 60% and that speed helps this condition, not heavy weight.


    Sixth:

    You will also note that the Weider pyramid principle is quite effective here. Begin your group of sets with increased speed and lighter weights more reps. Progress onto sets with heavier weight, slower speed and less reps. Finish by returning to the faster speed, lighter weight and higher reps.

    Continue to raise the weight on the lower rep sets until you have obtained 80% of your original strength or that of the opposite healthy side.

    As your speed increases, you should note a decrease in pain. During this rehabilitation protocol you will have to back up to a previous step several times.

    You can train more often, since you are at sub-maximal levels. It is like jogging everyday, you need to rest, but under most conditions you can recover quickly.

    As time goes on, you will be able to return to your pre-injury weight. You will also need to consider that at least once or twice a month, you will need to use speed training/plyometics to stimulate your tendons to thicken and promote proper collateral circulation around them. Have a great workout.


    Tendonosis Rehab Summary

    *

    Determine the painful movements.
    *

    Warm the area up with lighter weights/slower movements.
    *

    Train the painful motion using lighter weights/slow movements at first, then progressing to faster and faster movements.
    *

    Train at speeds to complete a movement at very high speeds for time intervals of 15, 30, 45, 60 seconds. Special equipment may be required or use of therapy bands.
    *

    Reduce the speed and use more weight (1-10%) still maintaining a slower speed at first, and then progressing to a higher speed. Use the Weider pyramid principle to include speed sets with heavier sets.

    There are better choices for exercises depending on your particular injury. Trial and error is the best way to determine which are best for your program.

    Example Of Bench Pressing For Max 150lb Bench Press
    Set # Protocol Weight (lbs)
    1 15 seconds = 30 reps high speed 45
    2 30 seconds = 60 reps high speed 45
    3 15 reps /2 seconds each way 50
    4 10 reps /2 seconds each way 60
    5 45 seconds = 70 reps high speed 45
    6 60 seconds= 100 reps high speed 45
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    sounds like decent advise.

    I also had luck...no cure...but luck with doing my own physical therapy on my arm. Wrist curls, wrist extensions and ulnar/radial deviation. Which if you can think of a holding a hammer in your hand and with your arm on your leg, rotating the hammer from one side of your leg to the other.

    It's late at night, so if that makes absolutely no sense let me know and I'll find a pic.

    I also found running did a lot of good for mine. The blood flow to the tendons in the elbow are low so anytime you can get the area warmed up and working it will increase the blood flow. Plus there isn't a load while running.

    My best advise...find what works best for you and stick with it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefighter2032 View Post
    sounds like decent advise.

    I also had luck...no cure...but luck with doing my own physical therapy on my arm. Wrist curls, wrist extensions and ulnar/radial deviation. Which if you can think of a holding a hammer in your hand and with your arm on your leg, rotating the hammer from one side of your leg to the other.

    It's late at night, so if that makes absolutely no sense let me know and I'll find a pic.

    I also found running did a lot of good for mine. The blood flow to the tendons in the elbow are low so anytime you can get the area warmed up and working it will increase the blood flow. Plus there isn't a load while running.



    My best advise...find what works best for you and stick with it.
    Funny, but the guy who provided my ART therapy recommended doing the ulnar/radial deviation with a hammer. I actually have done that and have found that more beneficial than the normally recommended wrist curls/extensions. Weird, but helpful.
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    sub'd..... I feel your pain!!
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    Thumbs up


    [QUOTE=glipp;1348559]Just to check back in on this thread, thanks for the replies everyone. Thought I would share an article that I found helpful and I will be incorporating into my training. Still trying to get a handle on exactly how I will use it ie: which exercises, etc. Sorry for the length of the article. Anyway here it is:

    This is very similar to the info I read and followed. It worked very well and after a few months I had no pain at all. The Idea behind the Hammer is to work the fast twitch muscles in the forearm. I do the same type of movement with light dumbbells. Good luck man, hope it gets better soon.
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    Last year I stopped a pretty good lifting session due to a possible torn bicep...finally went for an MRI after both arms started to hurt. The left had pain really bad that actually started radiating up my arm and started to burn. All of my online research led me to believe that at least my left was partially torn. I have had "golfer's" elbow for over ten years...never golfed..but I found that reverse curls helped...so in my infinite wisdom, I took some Anti-Inflams, and curled the hell out of my arms...got worse..
    So...end of story...I supposedly have tendonitis in both arms..worse than before..
    Like Firefighter described above...part of my therapy involves rotating a dumbbell, held on the end, with my arm on a bench..so that the wrist hangs over the edge...if that makes sense. I use a 5 pound weight with (two) 1 1/4 plate mate magnets on the top end of that dumbbell, as I was too lazy to look for a proper sized weight. This particular therapy has worked well, and I'm back in the gym (basement) for almost 3 months, without flareup...and no NSAID's.
    The "prolotherapy" tab is coming up...
    good luck.
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    Stretch out your forearm flexors, bicep minor, and bicep. Rub and massage "across" the muscle fiber and "lengthwise" in your forearm and bicep area. Focus on strengthening your fingers and not your grip. so put a rubberbands or hair bands around your finger tips and focus on opening and closing your hands or by spreading them open and closing them. This is what we do in PT for people that claim to have tenis elbow etc. light weights, and bandwork will aid in the recovery. hope this helps!
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    Im 27 and have had golfers elbow. im rehabbing it right now. ive tried every supplement under thye sun. Nsaids for two months(did nothing) cortisone shot(that worked well for me) I ice , stretch before and after and dress it. I had to take six months off upper body. The only way for it to get better in my experience is take time off. it sucks but that's what had to be done for me. I tried every way around it it just got worst. take the time off and it'll heal.

    Db I am curious do you think people that had "Golfers elbow will ever be able to be pullups, rack chins?(I currently am doing light pull-downs)
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    Quote Originally Posted by smeton_yea View Post
    Db I am curious do you think people that had "Golfers elbow will ever be able to be pullups, rack chins?(I currently am doing light pull-downs)

    I've had the curse of the golfer's elbow and I'm now able to do just about everything except pull ups. I do use straps when doing pulling exercises to help take the tension off of the forearms.

    For pulldowns now, I use the bar that has the hands facing each other. Don't know why, put it seems to not hurt my forearms. I also have to use a restricted range of motion, if my arms go too high it seems to pull on that tendon.

    I am aiming for one day to be able to do pullups again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefighter2032 View Post
    I've had the curse of the golfer's elbow and I'm now able to do just about everything except pull ups. I do use straps when doing pulling exercises to help take the tension off of the forearms.

    For pulldowns now, I use the bar that has the hands facing each other. Don't know why, put it seems to not hurt my forearms. I also have to use a restricted range of motion, if my arms go too high it seems to pull on that tendon.

    I am aiming for one day to be able to do pullups again.
    How long has it been since the golfers elbow has acted up and since youve been able to go heavy?

    Im in the rehab stage and go light due to if I go heavy it can aggravate it . from all the people Ive talked with time seems to be the biggest issue. one guy said it took a year for his to fully heal(after he stopped aggravating it)
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    I've had a long history of dealing with it. At least 4 years. I have the occassional flare up but I've learned to listen to my body so when I do over use it, it's not too bad.

    I have found a few things that seem to really help it when it does act up: Jump roping and using 2 golf balls and twirling them around in my hand. Kinda like you see the chinese balls with bells in them. Yep, none of that sounded right, but I'm unsure how else to explain it.

    For whatever reason the repetitive motion seems to loosen it up and dispense the flare up fairly quickly.

    Oratropin helped mine alot, but IBE doesn't make it anymore, you can look into IGF-1, it does miracles for curing injured tendons.

    Lots of Ice too, after every workout I ice my arm down.
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefighter2032 View Post
    I've had a long history of dealing with it. At least 4 years. I have the occassional flare up but I've learned to listen to my body so when I do over use it, it's not too bad.

    I have found a few things that seem to really help it when it does act up: Jump roping and using 2 golf balls and twirling them around in my hand. Kinda like you see the chinese balls with bells in them. Yep, none of that sounded right, but I'm unsure how else to explain it.

    For whatever reason the repetitive motion seems to loosen it up and dispense the flare up fairly quickly.

    Oratropin helped mine alot, but IBE doesn't make it anymore, you can look into IGF-1, it does miracles for curing injured tendons.

    Lots of Ice too, after every workout I ice my arm down.
    I have good insurance. would insurance cover it you think if I could convince my doctor?
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    No...IGF is a research chemical. You could try to get HGH, but it's not as affective. Go under the IGF forum portion and you'll find loads of info.

    Best of Luck
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    I have had this problem in both forearms and found that wearing a tight elastic or adjustable band around the forearm, just below the elbow helped tremendously. I wore it in and out of the gym. It hurt to pick up a gallon of milk and pour it. Of course, now it spread to the other arm.

    I have since added wrist curls, rotations and hi reps movements for the forearm muscles and things are getting better. They were the weak link and heavy DB rows, pulldowns were slowly tearing them up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glipp View Post
    I am 41 and have been dealing w/ chronic tendonitis/tendonisis in my forearms (mostly the r. one) for the past 8 months. It kept me out of the gym for about 6 months while I did P/T, Active Release Therapy, took Bulk Cissus, Celadrin, stretching, failed attempt at getting Oratropin, etc. Now I am back in the gym and it seems to be acting up again. I have made adjustments in my training ie: form, grip, exercises, etc. I have thought of many possible causes (ie: age and have to deal with it, test too low or hormonal imbalance?, wrong style training (5x5 too heavy a load) maybe I should be doing HST for example with less volume. Can't figure it out though. Anyone else dealing with this problem found an effective way to deal with it? I don't want to be out of the gym again. Any ideas would be appreciated.
    Interesting, since I'm going through the same thing myself. My tendonitis is in the back of my forearm on running toward the thumb-side. Curls just KILL me, although I have found moving my hands toward the middle of the ez curl bar helps some.

    I just finished a round of HST, the lower weights for high reps were fine but once I got to within 20# of what would be my normal weight, it started to flare up again.

    I took last week off and started this week at lower weights, backing off as I started to feel it. I've had these kind of frustrating things before and have just had to bring them malong with lower weight until they got better.... a slow process. NSAIDs can help you get through the really painful periods, but as you know, you shouldn't take them for long periods of time.
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    Carl so tennis elbow? I had the opposite. although it hasnt been acting up I'm very careful not to let it act up. Ive pushed it before doing a back exercise a nautilus row exercise. I mean I had to completely eliminate all my exercises and find what works. I know I can go back to some and all of the e3ercise I once did do, it's just taking time for the inside to get back together. Any thing that causes pain the next day(the bad pain not the good pain which is muscle soreness) is only setting you back. I speak from experience
    I took nsaids for two months all they did for me is mask the pain they didn't make it better. its best not to workout stuff that caused the pain in the first place using them because you cant feel what they do. I have not trained upper body for six months and have been doing light movements that don't cause pain. It has acted up on certain movements like the nautilus preacher curl bench so i just do db curls atm. Its something you have to work around in till you it's healed. cortisone shot helped me.

    It sucks not being able to do a pull up or any pressing movement (except light db presses) and having to work around and go light. what doesn't kill you makes you stronger...for it to get better you may have to take months off, i did. i don't know the severity of your injury. only you can access that and how much time is needed. Proper form is something I didn't pay attention to so much now it's a must.
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    Quote Originally Posted by smeton_yea View Post
    Carl so tennis elbow? I had the opposite. although it hasnt been acting up I'm very careful not to let it act up. Ive pushed it before doing a back exercise a nautilus row exercise. I mean I had to completely eliminate all my exercises and find what works. I know I can go back to some and all of the e3ercise I once did do, it's just taking time for the inside to get back together. Any thing that causes pain the next day(the bad pain not the good pain which is muscle soreness) is only setting you back. I speak from experience
    I took nsaids for two months all they did for me is mask the pain they didn't make it better. its best not to workout stuff that caused the pain in the first place using them because you cant feel what they do. I have not trained upper body for six months and have been doing light movements that don't cause pain. It has acted up on certain movements like the nautilus preacher curl bench so i just do db curls atm. Its something you have to work around in till you it's healed. cortisone shot helped me.

    It sucks not being able to do a pull up or any pressing movement (except light db presses) and having to work around and go light. what doesn't kill you makes you stronger...for it to get better you may have to take months off, i did. i don't know the severity of your injury. only you can access that and how much time is needed. Proper form is something I didn't pay attention to so much now it's a must.
    Not tennis elbow, since I associate that with more of the triceps movements ( and the elbow, I've had that too). Mine is in the proximal posterior forearm. Sounds like your problem is in a different area than mine. I can do press movements and triceps movements without aggravating it much...it's the curl movements and, to a lesser degree, the pulldown movements that make it flare up. So mine is a little easier to work around. Hate not being able to curl though (or curl ridiculously light weight).

    I'm approaching it from a physical therapy type af approach...a careful balance of rest and light exercise. Mine is improving, but you know haw easy a set-back can happen.

    Don't remember if you said you saw an MD, but it as long as this has gone on...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Hungus View Post

    Don't remember if you said you saw an MD, but it as long as this has gone on...
    yeah mine is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golfer%27s_elbow
    I think the about the same thing.

    yeah as long it its going on go light and do nothing to aggravate it. icing before and after has helped , stretch and wrapping the elbow or an elbow brace.
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    prednisone for the inflamation, then rebuild.
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    Im still have problems and may for a while...Im not aggravting though thats the main thing..whenever I feel slight pain i back off, then maybe a month later try the same exerciuse with the same weight...

    anyone tried ART?(Activate Release Therapy) jason Wojo has a video of him doing it on you tube.many athletics say it does wonders..Ive checked into it briefly and haven't found any places around here that does it. I might just move to another city seven hours away to get this done , if I can with my insurance...
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    I actually did ART. It was helpful but not a cure for me, though I have heard it is for many. Go to www.activerelease.com and you will see a place to do a provider search in the upper right hand corner. My insurance did not pay for it but I found a guy who was willing to provide the therapy for about $50 a session. It was helpful.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glipp View Post
    I actually did ART. It was helpful but not a cure for me, though I have heard it is for many. Go to www.activerelease.com and you will see a place to do a provider search in the upper right hand corner. My insurance did not pay for it but I found a guy who was willing to provide the therapy for about $50 a session. It was helpful.
    yeah the nearest provider is four hours away. I'm seeing this week if insurance covers it if not I may pay if I have the money. hopefully insurance covers it.

    YouTube - Jason Wojo chiropractor/ART/SASTM visit
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    http://saveyourself.ca/articles/frictions.php try this I did it today and felt better. also apt elbow sleeves . tried these today and a lot better. im not 35 and I have hammering my joints with heavy weight so I might be in the same category joint wise as a normal 35 year old or even worst considering my weight, which the more you weight the more stress your knees take.
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    I've had tendonitis in both elbows. Like the article that was posted said, it can take a very long time to heal AND you have to lay off of it. I can't take a year break from the gym. I went to an ortho and got a shot of cortizone in each elbow and within a day or two of each, they both were healed. You still need to train wisely and learn what you can do safely not to aggrevate it and what you absolutely have to lay off of. Good luck, it sucks!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by dg806 View Post
    I've had tendonitis in both elbows. Like the article that was posted said, it can take a very long time to heal AND you have to lay off of it. I can't take a year break from the gym. I went to an ortho and got a shot of cortizone in each elbow and within a day or two of each, they both were healed. You still need to train wisely and learn what you can do safely not to aggrevate it and what you absolutely have to lay off of. Good luck, it sucks!!
    can you do all exercises you want to or do you still train around them?

    how long has it been since it really started acting up and impairing exercise selection?
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    Quote Originally Posted by smeton_yea View Post
    can you do all exercises you want to or do you still train around them?

    how long has it been since it really started acting up and impairing exercise selection?
    The first one was my left elbow around 2002-2003. I could go to pick up a milk jug out of the fridge and I would almost drop it. When I got the shot in that elbow, it brought tears to my eyes the tendon was so sore. But in a day or two it was fine. Overhead tricep exts got that.....I never do those anymore. The second was my right early this yr. Not sure what really caused this other than overuse period. Got a shot and several days later it was fine. Now my left is sore again from pullups, earlier this summer. I started doing as many as I could do, 8-10 first set, 6-8 second set and so on till I did 100 on back day. In addition to everything else, I put too much on it. It has slowly got better, but I still can't do straight bar curls for crap. It kills my forearm and elbow. I may have to go get another shot soon. It sucks to have to work around something.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dg806 View Post
    The first one was my left elbow around 2002-2003. I could go to pick up a milk jug out of the fridge and I would almost drop it. When I got the shot in that elbow, it brought tears to my eyes the tendon was so sore. But in a day or two it was fine. Overhead tricep exts got that.....I never do those anymore. The second was my right early this yr. Not sure what really caused this other than overuse period. Got a shot and several days later it was fine. Now my left is sore again from pullups, earlier this summer. I started doing as many as I could do, 8-10 first set, 6-8 second set and so on till I did 100 on back day. In addition to everything else, I put too much on it. It has slowly got better, but I still can't do straight bar curls for crap. It kills my forearm and elbow. I may have to go get another shot soon. It sucks to have to work around something.
    surgery my last option and I'm not going to struggle with this ****. Ill get the surgery if I have to.
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    I was just diagnosed with tendonitis on my right forearm. dammit. with thumb arthritis too no less. I thought it was carpal tunnel
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyEJL View Post
    I was just diagnosed with tendonitis on my right forearm. dammit. with thumb arthritis too no less. I thought it was carpal tunnel
    welcome to the club easy.
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    Everything seems all better for the time being anyway. Pulsing Epi seems to have sped up/cemented the healing process. Back to my pre-injury weight.
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    Quote Originally Posted by smeton_yea View Post
    http://saveyourself.ca/articles/frictions.php try this I did it today and felt better. also apt elbow sleeves . tried these today and a lot better. im not 35 and I have hammering my joints with heavy weight so I might be in the same category joint wise as a normal 35 year old or even worst considering my weight, which the more you weight the more stress your knees take.
    just tryed this out... and my elbow feels great. will probably do it again later but did seem to help. thanks
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    I'm 41 and a couple of years ago had the same problem in my right forearm. It really put a damper on my workouts for a few months. I was considering going to a doctor. One day I looked at my forearms and realized they looked soft and weak, especially for someone lifting as heavy as I was. I began squeezing a hard rubber ball all throughout the day and the pain went away in less than a week.
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