Does Age Affect Your Training? Leave Your Ego at the Gym Door

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    Does Age Affect Your Training? Leave Your Ego at the Gym Door


    Does Age Affect Your Training?

    In a word, yes. Age does affect your training. That's the short answer. But how it affects your training is really up to the individual. If you are 20-something, you can train until you drop, and other than being tired and maybe a little sore, the effects wear off quickly and soon you are ready to hit it again.

    It's not that easy if you are in your late middle age or early old age. I am 63 years-old. I worked out in the gym at least five days a week for about 15 years. My training, while vigorous, was never strenuous. My goal was always to stay fit. Then, about three years ago I got the outrageous idea that I could train to prepare myself to enter a bodybuilding contest. Now that's an idea whose time had come. Imagine my wife's reaction when I told her the news. But, she was supportive and so I proceeded.

    Training for a bodybuilding competition required many hard hours in the gym, a strict diet and a totally different life-style. Here, age makes a difference and does have an affect.

    Lifting heavy weights with "old" muscles can be dangerous if you don't stay focused. It's easy to pull, rip, tear or stretch a muscle during an exercise that can stop you in your tracks and end your contest preparation on the spot.

    I took great care in the gym to make sure I stretched my muscles before and after each set. I drank plenty of water during my workouts and I never continued a lift or pull if I felt the least twinge. I stopped the set at that point and didn't continue the exercise. I also never lifted more than I should, just to lift. My weight training was purposeful and therefore carefully planned.

    To prepare for my first contest, I worked out 45 minutes a day, five days a week for 10 months prior to the contest date. During that time, I worked progressively harder each week as I grew stronger and never suffered a single injury nor did I miss a day of training, and my energy level remained very high. My fellow gym rats frequently gibed, "Old Navy is pumped today."

    I entered my first contest ready to compete. I continued to train vigorously for the next 16 months and entered a total of 16 bodybuilding competitions, winning 32 weight, height, age and Best Poser (3) trophies, including my NGA and IDFA Masters Pro Cards, again, without sustaining a single training injury.

    Simply put, if you are 20, it's OK to act like you are 20. If you are 63, it's not OK to act like you are 20.

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    As someone starting to feel the effects of age, I would highly agree. Good advice.
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    Very nice job, and somewhat inspiring to read.

    My problem is Im half your age, and Im finding that I am not recovering from hard training as quickly as I did when I was half my age, so it is affecting my workouts/routines, and I have to make changes or take an extra day off due to extreme muscle soreness and old old injuries are manifesting themselves into achy everyday problem areas when training.

    Any ideas on overcoming this stuff, I cant be training too hard, I dont think, but I might need to stop trying to train like a 20 year old.
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    Thats a useful and inspiring story ON. Congrats on your great effort and success.

    I've never been a bodybuilder, but I have been lifting since 1951 and at 65 I agree many things must change with time. For me I had to get away from the 5 days a week, 2 I/2 hrs per day that was really overtraining. As I got excited about powerlifting I shifted to 4 days per week and 1 1/4 hrs per. That turned out to be a decisive change. I also started adding longer breaks between each set. Again I push it pretty hard for my age such as today where I did my pulldowns and rows on the HS machines at 360 and my rack pulls at 365. FYI, I am working my way back from a mini-stroke last summer and just now getting back to my former highs. To do this kind of work I need more rest between sets and at night. I also rely heavily on my CEE to uphold my recovery. I try to supplement and frankly, love the results from AP, Powerfull and Cissus (the latter two megadosed to hell and back). Basicly it's a case of giving myself a chance to do my best with time being the key ingredient.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadBlocK View Post
    Very nice job, and somewhat inspiring to read.

    My problem is Im half your age, and Im finding that I am not recovering from hard training as quickly as I did when I was half my age, so it is affecting my workouts/routines, and I have to make changes or take an extra day off due to extreme muscle soreness and old old injuries are manifesting themselves into achy everyday problem areas when training.

    Any ideas on overcoming this stuff, I cant be training too hard, I dont think, but I might need to stop trying to train like a 20 year old.

    Roadblock, when you have a moment, describe your average workout. I might be able to offer a few suggestions. What supplements do you take? I might be able to offer you some suggestions there, too.

    I am a "tested" athlete, so I don't use steroids, andros, HRT or TRT or prescription diuretics. But for guys who don't care about competing and who aren't interested in muscle "enhancers," HRT and TRT are very beneficial, under a doctor's watchful care.

    My supplements include protein shakes, branch chain amino acids, creatine, glutamine, anti-oxidants and multi-vitamins.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchman View Post
    Thats a useful and inspiring story ON. Congrats on your great effort and success.

    I've never been a bodybuilder, but I have been lifting since 1951 and at 65 I agree many things must change with time. For me I had to get away from the 5 days a week, 2 I/2 hrs per day that was really overtraining. As I got excited about powerlifting I shifted to 4 days per week and 1 1/4 hrs per. That turned out to be a decisive change. I also started adding longer breaks between each set. Again I push it pretty hard for my age such as today where I did my pulldowns and rows on the HS machines at 360 and my rack pulls at 365. FYI, I am working my way back from a mini-stroke last summer and just now getting back to my former highs. To do this kind of work I need more rest between sets and at night. I also rely heavily on my CEE to uphold my recovery. I try to supplement and frankly, love the results from AP, Powerfull and Cissus (the latter two megadosed to hell and back). Basicly it's a case of giving myself a chance to do my best with time being the key ingredient.
    Dutchman: I admire your grit. It takes a lot more than what I do to be a top power lifter. My hat is off to you, Man. Keep charging, Warrior. I'm glad to know the stroke didn't do you in. Way to keep on Charging!
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsade View Post


    As someone starting to feel the effects of age, I would highly agree. Good advice.
    dsade: Thanks for the Props. I appreciate them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutchman View Post
    Thats a useful and inspiring story ON. Congrats on your great effort and success.

    I've never been a bodybuilder, but I have been lifting since 1951 and at 65 I agree many things must change with time. For me I had to get away from the 5 days a week, 2 I/2 hrs per day that was really overtraining. As I got excited about powerlifting I shifted to 4 days per week and 1 1/4 hrs per. That turned out to be a decisive change. I also started adding longer breaks between each set. Again I push it pretty hard for my age such as today where I did my pulldowns and rows on the HS machines at 360 and my rack pulls at 365. FYI, I am working my way back from a mini-stroke last summer and just now getting back to my former highs. To do this kind of work I need more rest between sets and at night. I also rely heavily on my CEE to uphold my recovery. I try to supplement and frankly, love the results from AP, Powerfull and Cissus (the latter two megadosed to hell and back). Basicly it's a case of giving myself a chance to do my best with time being the key ingredient.
    Glad to know you're still here. Although, it's a fact that heavy
    lifting, which is more intense with more straining, will raise
    BP to dangerous levels for someone with a history of CVA.
    Might be flirtin' w/ disaster. Not saying stop training. But maybe
    let wisdom prevail in your routine.
    Last edited by Ribo68; 03-01-2007 at 07:06 AM. Reason: type o
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ribo68 View Post
    Glad to know you're still here. Although, it's a fact that heavy
    lifting, which is more intense with more straining, will raise
    BP to dangerous levels for someone with a history of CVA.
    Might be flirtin' w/ disaster. Not saying stop training. But maybe
    let wisdom prevail in your routine.
    Good advice. Thanks for your post.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ribo68 View Post
    Glad to know you're still here. Although, it's a fact that heavy
    lifting, which is more intense with more straining, will raise
    BP to dangerous levels for someone with a history of CVA.
    Might be flirtin' w/ disaster. Not saying stop training. But maybe
    let wisdom prevail in your routine.
    I appreciate your comments. Still after discussion with my Doc and with the supps I take for my BP, cholesterol, liver etc my test numbers come out great. I slowly built back up to lifting very heavy again and feel very comfortable with it.
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