Low Testosterone Linked to Increased Mortality - AnabolicMinds.com

Low Testosterone Linked to Increased Mortality

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    Low testosterone in men over 40 linked to early death


    Low testosterone in men over 40 linked to early death

    Men's Health News

    Published: Tuesday, 15-Aug-2006
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    According to a new study, after the age of forty, men with low levels of the male sex hormone testosterone may have a higher risk of death over a four-year period than those with normal levels of the hormone.
    The hormone testosterone is linked with virility and energy, and unlike women undergoing menopause, middle-aged men generally do not experience a dramatic decrease in the production of the sex hormones.

    Testosterone levels gradually decline as a man ages, decreasing approximately 1.5 percent per year after age 30 and the effects of low testosterone levels include decreased muscle mass and bone density, insulin resistance, decreased sex drive, less energy, irritability and feelings of depression.

    For the study Dr. Molly M. Shores and colleagues at the VA Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Washington, Seattle, studied the relationship between hormone levels and death in a total of 858 male veterans older than age 40 years.

    All participants had their testosterone levels checked at least twice between 1994 and 1999, with at least one week and no more than two years elapsing between tests. The men were followed for between four and eight years until 2002.

    The researchers found that men in the lowest of three categories of testosterone levels were at least 68 percent more likely to die in the following 4-1/2 years than those in the "normal" category.

    Of the 858 veterans, 166 had below normal testosterone levels and 35 percent died during the study period compared to a 20 percent death rate for subjects with normal testosterone levels.

    Dr. Shores says levels of testosterone drop when serious illness strikes and recovers when the illness passes, or does not if health fails to improve.

    Even when the researchers considered other variables that may influence risk of death, such as age, other illnesses and body mass index, the association between low testosterone levels and death persisted.

    The study is published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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    Re: Low testosterone in men over 40 linked to early death


    So us men over 40 should be able to see the doc once a month for testosterone injections and our health insurance should cover it? :bb:
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    Post Low Testosterone Linked to Increased Mortality


    Hormone 'connected to death risk'

    Men over the age of 40 with low levels of testosterone have an increased risk of dying, according to research.

    US scientists studied the relationship between testosterone levels and death in 858 military veterans aged over 40.

    In the Archives of Internal Medicine, they report men with low hormone levels had an 88% increased risk of death compared with men with normal levels.

    But another expert said the study was not representative of the general population and contained weaknesses.

    Studies are needed to clarify the association between low testosterone levels and mortality
    Dr Molly Shores and colleagues

    Scientists at the University of Washington and Veteran's Association (VA) Puget Health Care System, both based in Seattle, studied male veterans who had had their testosterone levels measured at least twice between 1994 and 1999.

    Their health records were then tracked until 2002.

    The researchers found 53% of the men had normal testosterone levels, 28% had fluctuating levels where the average was classified as normal (termed equivocal levels), and 19% had low levels.

    Over the course of the study, the researchers found 20.1% of men with normal levels had died, compared with 24.6% of men with equivocal levels and 34.9% of men with low levels.

    Increased death risk

    After adjusting the figures to take into account factors such as age, body mass index and other illnesses, the researchers found men with low testosterone levels were 88% more likely to die than those with normal levels.

    The researchers then removed the men who had died within one year of taking the second testosterone sample from their calculations, as critical illnesses can cause testosterone levels to dramatically decrease.

    They still found men with low levels had a 68% increased mortality risk.

    Molly Shores, the author of the study, wrote with colleagues: "The persistence of elevated mortality risk after excluding early deaths suggests that the association between low testosterone and mortality is not simply due to acute illness.

    "Large prospective studies are needed to clarify the association between low testosterone levels and mortality."

    They pointed out their study might not be representative because it focused on military veterans, who had a higher risk of death than the normal population.

    Study flawed'

    But Pierre Bouloux, professor of endocrinology from the Royal Free Hospital in London, said while testosterone and mortality had been linked, the study contained several weaknesses and could not be extrapolated to the general population.

    "This is a VA - Veteran's Administration - study. The poorest people in the US go to the VA, who come from a very low socio-economic status - which is known to have an impact on mortality.

    "This makes it very difficult to know if you can extrapolate these results to the generality of the population.

    "It also seems very odd to me that the mortality amongst all of the men is so high but the problem is that the study does not even tell us what the causes of the deaths are," he added.

    "The fact that it is also retrospective study rather than prospective is also not helpful. As the authors themselves state, to pursue any association, you really need a prospective study."

    Story from BBC NEWS:
    BBC NEWS | Health | Hormone 'connected to death risk'

    Published: 2006/08/14 2307 GMT
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