The free radical theory of graying

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    Post The free radical theory of graying


    The free radical theory of graying

    An article published in the July, 2006 issue of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) journal submitted the hypothesis of researchers at Humboldt University in Berlin that the destruction of pigment cells called melanocytes that leads to the production of white hair by the hair follicles is due to free radical damage caused mainly by the generation of the pigment melanin, which results in significant oxidative stress.

    The researchers studied hair follicles obtained from graying donors and found an increase in melanocyte apoptosis (programmed cell self-destruction) and oxidative stress. A mitochondrial DNA deletion that is a marker for accumulating oxidative stress damage was found primarily in graying hair follicles compared to pigmented follicles. Additionally, when cultured pigmented hair follicles were exposed to a chemical that generates oxidative stress they were found to have an increase in hair bulb melanocyte apoptosis. Interestingly, unpigmented hair follicles were demonstrated to have a better capacity to grow in culture than pigmented follicles, which the authors suggest could be due in part to lower overall oxidative stress caused by the reduction in melanocytes.

    In addition to oxidative stress generated within the body, the authors suggest that exogenous oxidative stress caused by ultraviolet light and other factors could also be at fault in graying hair, and note that smokers have a greater incidence of premature graying.

    "The graying hair follicle therefore offers a unique model-system to study oxidative stress effects and aging and to test antioxidants and other antiaging therapeutics in their ability to slow down or even stop this process," the authors write. They suggest that clinical trials monitor hair follicle melanocytes as a measure of oxidative stress-tissue damage and the effectiveness of antiaging and antioxidant therapeutics.

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    Interesting, this last year mine had really started to gray, I take antioxidants everday, I may up the amount an see what happens...
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    Interesting article, but I started going gray when I was 16. So I don't think there was a whole lot of stress in my life then.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdarrell
    Interesting article, but I started going gray when I was 16. So I don't think there was a whole lot of stress in my life then.
    Some people are genetically pre-disposed.....others are succeptable to environmental stresses.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdarrell
    Interesting article, but I started going gray when I was 16. So I don't think there was a whole lot of stress in my life then.
    I may only be saying this because mine isn't grey, but going prematurely grey is far, far, far better than going prematurely bald. And besides, you can have the Richard Gere thing going on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mulletsoldier
    I may only be saying this because mine isn't grey, but going prematurely grey is far, far, far better than going prematurely bald. And besides, you can have the Richard Gere thing going on.
    I am goning gray (have been for awhile) and I will say it is better than going prematurely bald. My grandfather was completely bald by the time he was 20, so I guess I'll keep my gray hair.
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    The only bad thing about grey hair is the coarser consistency.
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeahright
    The only bad thing about grey hair is the coarser consistency.
    Yes I do find that a major problem. At least with the color, I can always color it, but I find as the years tick by my hair is a lot coarser and there is not a whole lot I can do about it.
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    I started going grey at 19, I have salt and pepper hair now which I kind of like, and my grandparents all have grey hair... so here's the question:
    Will my salt and pepper hair abruptly go grey/silver when I start using Melanotan II in a few months?
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