Finished 10 week cycle and got injured!

atlbrvfan

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Hey guys! Yep, I did a 10 week cycle of Test with Tren taken week 4-8 and the Monday after I took my last dose of Test I hurt myself very bad. I was at the gym this past Monday night doing chest. I was on my 4th set of flat. I had climbed up from 135, 225, and 275 to 315. I was on my way down for my 3rd rep and I heard and felt my right pec rip. I immediately went home and put ice on it. The pain was severe. I could not really flex well enough to see if everything was still in place.

The next day I went to see my family doctor. He referred me to an orthopedic surgeon. I saw the surgeon yesterday and I now have surgery scheduled for this coming Monday. I am starting to hate Mondays. LOL. When I flex my rigth pec it jumps toward my sternum.

What made it happen??? Do you think the steroids made me think I could do things I couldn't do? Do you think my muscles got strong so fast that my tendons and ligaments could not handle the weight? Also, I am probably looking at 3 months without working any upperbody. I will be doing cardio and legs. My arms had went from a little under 17 to 17.5 during my cycle. My bench had went up from about 280 to 345-350. I don't want to lose everything I worked so hard for. Any suggestions?

I am planning on keeping my protein high and my diet clean. I am just depressed and frustrated. My arm is so bruised it looks like I have been beat with a baseball bat.
 
Max32

Max32

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Hey guys! Yep, I did a 10 week cycle of Test with Tren taken week 4-8 and the Monday after I took my last dose of Test I hurt myself very bad. I was at the gym this past Monday night doing chest. I was on my 4th set of flat. I had climbed up from 135, 225, and 275 to 315. I was on my way down for my 3rd rep and I heard and felt my right pec rip. I immediately went home and put ice on it. The pain was severe. I could not really flex well enough to see if everything was still in place.

The next day I went to see my family doctor. He referred me to an orthopedic surgeon. I saw the surgeon yesterday and I now have surgery scheduled for this coming Monday. I am starting to hate Mondays. LOL. When I flex my rigth pec it jumps toward my sternum.

What made it happen??? Do you think the steroids made me think I could do things I couldn't do? Do you think my muscles got strong so fast that my tendons and ligaments could not handle the weight? Also, I am probably looking at 3 months without working any upperbody. I will be doing cardio and legs. My arms had went from a little under 17 to 17.5 during my cycle. My bench had went up from about 280 to 345-350. I don't want to lose everything I worked so hard for. Any suggestions?

I am planning on keeping my protein high and my diet clean. I am just depressed and frustrated. My arm is so bruised it looks like I have been beat with a baseball bat.
Sorry bro, but chances are you will be weaker than when you started your cycle, and prob quite a bit. Take creatine and high dose glutamine to help with muscle wasting. I am sure you realize just how important proper PCT is at this time. Keep your diet in check as well. During the recovery process, I would recommend an Active Release Therapist as well
 

Kaboju

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Also cissus. I did the same thing on tren, I hurt my shoulder. Strength came really quick and my joints couldn't keep up. Simple as that for me.
 

Poobah

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perhaps pick up some CISSUS RX for pain and cortisol control.. and perhaps some lean extreme or both. that should help slow down the wasting and heal faster... as well as numb the pain. (at least that's what the reviews are leading me to think)
 

atlbrvfan

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Sorry bro, but chances are you will be weaker than when you started your cycle, and prob quite a bit. Take creatine and high dose glutamine to help with muscle wasting. I am sure you realize just how important proper PCT is at this time. Keep your diet in check as well. During the recovery process, I would recommend an Active Release Therapist as well.




What does Active Release Therapist mean? Physical therapy?
 

Kaboju

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Sort of, it is along the lines of a mix between that and massage therapy.
 

Tad50

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It's DEEP tissue massage that breaks up scar tissue. It hurts like hell but works like a charm.
 

Kaboju

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[font=Tahoma, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]What is Active Release Techniques[/font][/font][font=Tahoma, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]®[/font]

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[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif][font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]The Active Release Techniques [/font][font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Soft Tissue Management System was developed and founded by Dr. Michael Leahy, DC, CCSP. Dr. Leahy is currently conducting research with the University of California San Diego Medical School on cumulative trauma disorders. Additionally, he serves on the Colorado Division of Worker’s Compensation Guidelines Committee for the treatment of cumulative trauma disorders[/font]. [font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Dr. Leahy’s works have been published in several peer- reviewed journals[/font][/font][font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif].[/font]

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[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Active Release provides a way to diagnose and treat the underlying causes of a variety of conditions collectively called cumulative trauma disorders. These disorders are also known as repetitive stress injuries or "overuse" syndromes. These syndromes are given familiar names like rotator cuff syndrome, tendonitis and plantar fascitis. Other conditions that fall directly into this category are post- operative scar tissue, carpal tunnel, chronic low back pain, and hyper extension/flexion injury (whiplash). [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Understanding Soft Tissue Dysfunction [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]To understand soft tissue injury, you must comprehend the basic mechanism of cumulative injury. Cumulative trauma disorder is the major injury problem in the workforce and the general population in this country. Federal statistics show that it now surpasses back pain, and worsening by 670 percent in the last 5 years. Past therapies such as massage, heat, cold, electrical stimulation, rest, exercise and surgery – have all failed to treat them effectively.� Leahy [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Symptoms of cumulative trauma disorders are sensations of tingling, burning, aching and weaknesses. When a muscle, tendon, ligament, or nerve is damaged from trauma or overuse, the body will attempt to repair the damage with scar tissue. These scar tissue adhesions left untreated perpetuate the cumulative injury cycle and result in progressive loss of function and increased pain. Soft tissue dysfunction often leads to a loss of flexibility, strength, and range of motion. People often attribute these losses to "just getting old," but this is seldom the case. [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Active Release separates, releases, and stretches the connective tissue adhesions, restores vascular and lymph circulation, and increases your range of motion, flexibility, and strength. [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]The treatments can be a bit uncomfortable, or even a little painful, but this pain is an important indicator that the problem has been located and signals that the treatments are correcting the injury. Patients often report that it "hurts good." [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Regardless of your activity level you can benefit from Active Release. From those who are victims of car accidents -- or even the proud weekend warrior -- Active Release has proven to be a fast, effective, non-invasive way to heal a wide variety of soft tissue injuries. [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Why Active Release is Different [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Active Release is a highly successful approach to injuries of muscles, tendons, nerves, and the surrounding soft tissues. Active Release is not massage, physiotherapy, or chiropractic care. While those procedures relieve muscle and motion dysfunction, they do not necessarily address the underlying problems caused by scar tissue formation. [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif][/font]

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[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif][/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]The three most common
mechanisms of injury are:
[/font]
  • [font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Acute trauma [/font]
  • [font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Constant pressure [/font]
  • [font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Repetitive motion.[/font]
[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]All three are a part of the cumulative injury cycle. Soft tissue structures in the body change or adapt with time: these changes are predictable and can be felt by the doctor. Chronic or "older" injuries actually feel different from acute or recent ones. [/font]
[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Active Release has proven to be especially valuable for athletes, from the professional to the beginner. Ninety percent of the time athletes with acute or long- standing muscular strain/sprain injuries experience complete recovery -- in a short period of time. [/font]

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif]Many patients experience complete recovery after only 5–10 visits, although this depends on the severity of their injuries. Because of the soft tissue component, where other treatments fail, ART succeeds. The bottom line is that patients get well quickly, completely, and with much less expense.[/font]
 
JonesersRX7

JonesersRX7

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....... Do you think the steroids made me think I could do things I couldn't do? Do you think my muscles got strong so fast that my tendons and ligaments could not handle the weight? .......
You already said it. The muscle grows a heck of a lot faster then the tendons and ligaments. Max already made some great suggestions. My only other advise would be to listen to your ortho and don't go rushing back into things. Recover slow and build up the weight.

Best of luck man.
 

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