Does a degree really matter anymore?

puccah8808

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I am in a situation where I have a degree in Accounting but my experience is not long enough (4 years), so I am put into this entry level position where I am competing with those who have experience but no degree. I understand that I have to work my way up, but why does a company ask for your degree if they are not going to pay you for having one?

It makes me question if I want to continue my education. I don’t want to be in debt just to find a job making less than what my tuition cost me. I don’t know, I’m in a rut.

Also, my coworker questioned me about my degree. She didn’t believe I had one because she wanted to take the same classes I had taken and asked me to show her my courses online. Surprisingly, the site was down that day and I told her that I would get it for her later. A few days later she told my boss that I did not have my degree and no experience. My boss took her words and I was let go without any questions. I just said thank you and packed my stuff and left. And this is why I am asking this question. Does it really matter anymore?
 
LiveToLift

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Most places I see a degree is required as well as experience. Therefore the entry level position you are in is preparing you for the much more successful future you will have. Get some real world experience under your belt and you will get whatever you apply for assuming all other aspects of you aren't unhireable. Lol

Edit: Just read you have 4 years experience in the field already. Odd that it would need more. Maybe try applying elsewhere.
 
LiveToLift

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Believe me in my type of work to get the best paying jobs that are a walk in the park you either have to have a degree or work your ass off from the bottom and then get topped off just barely over the entry level pay of those with the degrees.
 
muscleupcrohn

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Depends on the field really. Something like social media management/marketing for example, I know people with good jobs without a degree, but it wasn’t easy, took lots of time and multiple jobs, and a lot of side work and portfolio building. For something like engineering/law/etc where you’re not allowed to practice without a degree and a certification, it matters by definition as a requirement. Other jobs you can get entry/base level jobs, but you’ll be limited to the bottom of the ladder without a degree. On a different note, some jobs just want a degree period to get hired, even if it’s not in a relevant field, it’s an advantage over other people applying, and if the demand (for jobs) is greater than the supply (of jobs), they can say that they only want people with a degree. Even just looking on Indeed, lots of jobs just want a degree, often a bachelors, but don’t even specify the field/major/etc.
 
puccah8808

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Most places I see a degree is required as well as experience. Therefore the entry level position you are in is preparing you for the much more successful future you will have. Get some real world experience under your belt and you will get whatever you apply for assuming all other aspects of you aren't unhireable. Lol
Thank you. I know that I just have to be patient, but honestly, my heart is not in accounting and is why I’m switching over to law school. I won’t lie, I think people judge me for my tattoos as well. Even when I am fully covered. Sometimes my sleeve will peak out a bit or my chest tattoo, but I am usually in dress shirts and slacks.
 
puccah8808

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Depends on the field really. Something like social media management/marketing for example, I know people with good jobs without a degree, but it wasn’t easy, took lots of time and multiple jobs, and a lot of side work and portfolio building. For something like engineering/law/etc where you’re not allowed to practice without a degree and a certification, it matters by definition as a requirement. Other jobs you can get entry/base level jobs, but you’ll be limited to the bottom of the ladder without a degree. On a different note, some jobs just want a degree period to get hired, even if it’s not in a relevant field, it’s an advantage over other people applying, and if the demand (for jobs) is greater than the supply (of jobs), they can say that they only want people with a degree. Even just looking on Indeed, lots of jobs just want a degree, often a bachelors, but don’t even specify the field/major/etc.
I noticed that when I was searching for jobs. Basic entry levels are requiring degrees but won’t pay what the degree is worth. One guy emailed me offering $12 an hour. Like really? That’s what my experience and degree is worth? All I know is that my degrees will be over $100,000 and I cannot afford to work for someone who doesn’t understand the value of what I will bring to the table.
 
LiveToLift

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Thank you. I know that I just have to be patient, but honestly, my heart is not in accounting and is why I’m switching over to law school. I won’t lie, I think people judge me for my tattoos as well. Even when I am fully covered. Sometimes my sleeve will peak out a bit or my chest tattoo, but I am usually in dress shirts and slacks.
Definitely follow your heart and do something that makes you happy but be prepared for the battle of the bar. I have a very close family friend (female not that it matters just to relate to your situation I suppose) who busted her ass to pass law school. She is often referred to as legally blonde. Somewhat ditzy and doesn't come across as book smart. But she passed and got her law degree. She is now making about 11 dollars an hour working under lawyers and going on her 5th bar exam. Crazy how much work you can put in to be stuck without passing the final part. It's like the navy seal training in a way. You can be a complete monster and fly through things normal people would give up quick on but 1 test can be your Achilles.
 
puccah8808

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Definitely follow your heart and do something that makes you happy but be prepared for the battle of the bar. I have a very close family friend (female not that it matters just to relate to your situation I suppose) who busted her ass to pass law school. She is often referred to as legally blonde. Somewhat ditzy and doesn't come across as book smart. But she passed and got her law degree. She is now making about 11 dollars an hour working under lawyers and going on her 5th bar exam. Crazy how much work you can put in to be stuck without passing the final part. It's like the navy seal training in a way. You can be a complete monster and fly through things normal people would give up quick on but 1 test can be your Achilles.
Thank you! F*ck, I hope she passes this one! All that hard work for $11 sucks! That is pretty much like getting a CPA license. You work so hard, but you have this last hurdle that can make or break you.
 
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I can tell you the most degrees are devalued nowadays. I have been an engineer in the medical and biotech industries for 25 years and a person with a degree 20 years ago would walk into a sweet gig with good pay. I just hired someone with 5 years experience and solid body of work and this person is making 55k. Up here in Boston this person will barely get by on that salary.
 
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Im over in the UK so may be slightly different but, aside from fields like law, engineering and medicine, experience is much more valued.

Personally i dropped out of a law degree to go into sales, worked through estate agency (real estate) and recruitment (earning equiv in excess of $90,000 for most of that 10 years). Used that experience to get into bpo sales and salary is now much higher.

Ironically i employ people with degrees as trainees on $30,000 p/a.....just my experience but over here degrees are largely irrelevant if you have 5 years exp aside from those certain fields.
 
Aleksandar37

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Completely depends on what you want to do. Even with a law degree, there are a lot of possibilities and a wide range of pay. Ultimately what you want to do might not end education-wise after your JD.
 
LiveToLift

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Thank you! F*ck, I hope she passes this one! All that hard work for $11 sucks! That is pretty much like getting a CPA license. You work so hard, but you have this last hurdle that can make or break you.
I feel for her. Passed one of the hardest college schedules and is making crap money. With no bar the degree is pretty much useless. She could be doing the job she's doing right now without the degree. The bar is such a difficult and unpredictable tests. It isn't cheap at all either.
 
puccah8808

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I can tell you the most degrees are devalued nowadays. I have been an engineer in the medical and biotech industries for 25 years and a person with a degree 20 years ago would walk into a sweet gig with good pay. I just hired someone with 5 years experience and solid body of work and this person is making 55k. Up here in Boston this person will barely get by on that salary.
Wow, that’s pretty good with no degree. You didn’t require someone with experience and a degree?

Im over in the UK so may be slightly different but, aside from fields like law, engineering and medicine, experience is much more valued.

Personally i dropped out of a law degree to go into sales, worked through estate agency (real estate) and recruitment (earning equiv in excess of $90,000 for most of that 10 years). Used that experience to get into bpo sales and salary is now much higher.

Ironically i employ people with degrees as trainees on $30,000 p/a.....just my experience but over here degrees are largely irrelevant if you have 5 years exp aside from those certain fields.
That’s pretty low for someone with a degree. People with accounting experience can start at $18-24 an hour. I don’t know, I guess I’m just wondering if it was a waste of time since I’m competing for entry level positions.

Completely depends on what you want to do. Even with a law degree, there are a lot of possibilities and a wide range of pay. Ultimately what you want to do might not end education-wise after your JD.
I don’t think my education will ever end. I was just thinking that losing this job was a blessing in disguise because I want to get a certificate in esthetician (6 month program) before I start law school.

I feel for her. Passed one of the hardest college schedules and is making crap money. With no bar the degree is pretty much useless. She could be doing the job she's doing right now without the degree. The bar is such a difficult and unpredictable tests. It isn't cheap at all either.
I do, too. I really hope she passes this next one. She’s worked so hard!!!
 
jgntyce

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Great thread puccah8808! Definitely a thread that many of us can relate to!
 
puccah8808

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Great thread puccah8808! Definitely a thread that many of us can relate to!
Thank you, I know it’s off topic but I don’t have social media and wanted some insight.
 
LiveToLift

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Thank you, I know it’s off topic but I don’t have social media and wanted some insight.
Nothing's off topic here in the AM family. For many of us this site has been a big part of a good portion of our lives. I've been on this board for more than 6 years and have made some of the best friends I've ever had and gained valuable experience and guidance on so many different topics.
 
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I am in construction management and have worked on national historic landmarks throughout the country. I don't have a degree and it contributes to lower pay and less opportunity. With a degree I would be making 40% more overnight.

It matters
 
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Go Navy Seal. Where else can you get paid to kill people and workout.

SEAL = Sleep,Eat,and Lift
 
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Nothing's off topic here in the AM family. For many of us this site has been a big part of a good portion of our lives. I've been on this board for more than 6 years and have made some of the best friends I've ever had and gained valuable experience and guidance on so many different topics.
I’ve only been here 6 months and feel like that bro. Honestly didn’t expect to be learning about crypto for example, that thread has genuinely made me money I otherwise wouldn’t have.

The depth of knowledge AM members have, and the willingness to share it is awesome.
 
justhere4comm

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They did you a favor
It's not what others think is important but rather what you feel. Had you considered Forensic Accounting?

How I see things
Don't judge yourself based on what you earn but what you offer others around you.
Trust your gut as it will never lead you astray. My first love has been Art since I was very young, and it still is, yet I work in a job where a High School diploma is all that is needed. I have a M.Ed. I love what I do, and it pays the bills, but my Art is my love.

"Find what you love, and let it kill you."
-Henry Charles Bukowski
 
puccah8808

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They did you a favor
It's not what others think is important but rather what you feel. Had you considered Forensic Accounting?

How I see things
Don't judge yourself based on what you earn but what you offer others around you.
Trust your gut as it will never lead you astray. My first love has been Art since I was very young, and it still is, yet I work in a job where a High School diploma is all that is needed. I have a M.Ed. I love what I do, and it pays the bills, but my Art is my love.

"Find what you love, and let it kill you."
-Henry Charles Bukowski
Thank you so much! I truly needed this and you are completely correct. As I was looking at jobs this morning, I thought to myself... “They did me a favor because I hated working there, I never felt like I belonged! They can’t take away my degree or experiences.

I have considered forensic accounting but then it falls back to “I hate accounting.”

I am looking into the esthetician program, though. It’s only six months and something I can do before school in the fall. Plus, I have a passion for it! Art is a beautiful love... ❤
 
jbatts77

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I am in a situation where I have a degree in Accounting but my experience is not long enough (4 years), so I am put into this entry level position where I am competing with those who have experience but no degree. I understand that I have to work my way up, but why does a company ask for your degree if they are not going to pay you for having one?

It makes me question if I want to continue my education. I don’t want to be in debt just to find a job making less than what my tuition cost me. I don’t know, I’m in a rut.

Also, my coworker questioned me about my degree. She didn’t believe I had one because she wanted to take the same classes I had taken and asked me to show her my courses online. Surprisingly, the site was down that day and I told her that I would get it for her later. A few days later she told my boss that I did not have my degree and no experience. My boss took her words and I was let go without any questions. I just said thank you and packed my stuff and left. And this is why I am asking this question. Does it really matter anymore?
You should sue for wrongful termination.
 
puccah8808

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You should sue for wrongful termination.
It doesn’t even matter anymore. I am moving forward. Plus, the law protects the employer more than the employees. I want to work somewhere where I don’t feel like driving off a cliff every morning.

And also, I get back to training on a regular. :)
 
maggie.stine

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Both a degree and experience is needed for you to get a good job.
 
Godstrength

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There are plenty of good jobs that don’t require degrees.
I agree but also most jobs these days are looking for one or the other. Experience without the degree you will make less money. Degree without experience you will make less money. Degree with experience you can make more money. If you have neither your up ****s creek lol

I don't think its so much getting a good job but more the financial aspect is greatly increased when you have both working in your favor. You are right plenty of good jobs. Imo a good job is whatever makes you happy with your place of employment and your position in life.
 
puccah8808

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Both a degree and experience is needed for you to get a good job.
There are plenty of good jobs that don’t require degrees.
I agree but also most jobs these days are looking for one or the other. Experience without the degree you will make less money. Degree without experience you will make less money. Degree with experience you can make more money. If you have neither your up ****s creek lol

I don't think its so much getting a good job but more the financial aspect is greatly increased when you have both working in your favor. You are right plenty of good jobs. Imo a good job is whatever makes you happy with your place of employment and your position in life.
I agree with all you guys. I think what I have doing for the last few years was working for a title. I haven’t been happy at my last few jobs, and this last one just solidified my feelings regarding the career choices I have made. I always thought working in Corporate America was the epitome of finally making it. To most, it is, but it slowly killed me inside. I started looking for jobs this morning, nothing to do with a desk job at all.
 
THOR 70

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I agree with all you guys. I think what I have doing for the last few years was working for a title. I haven’t been happy at my last few jobs, and this last one just solidified my feelings regarding the career choices I have made. I always thought working in Corporate America was the epitome of finally making it. To most, it is, but it slowly killed me inside. I started looking for jobs this morning, nothing to do with a desk job at all.
Sounds like you need to go entrepreneurial route. I work in corporate America but also have some side stuff going which keeps me motivated/more fulfilled than just corporate job
 
rascal14

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I agree but also most jobs these days are looking for one or the other. Experience without the degree you will make less money. Degree without experience you will make less money. Degree with experience you can make more money. If you have neither your up ****s creek lol

I don't think its so much getting a good job but more the financial aspect is greatly increased when you have both working in your favor. You are right plenty of good jobs. Imo a good job is whatever makes you happy with your place of employment and your position in life.
I agree, but she said “Both a degree AND experience are needed for a good job.” Which means you have to have both, which is just far from true lol
 
puccah8808

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Sounds like you need to go entrepreneurial route. I work in corporate America but also have some side stuff going which keeps me motivated/more fulfilled than just corporate job
You are absolutely correct. I have been contemplating starting my own business for a long time. I can no longer be confined to a cubicle.

I agree, but she said “Both a degree AND experience are needed for a good job.” Which means you have to have both, which is just far from true lol
Both the President and VP at my last job had no degrees, just 50 years of experience between the two of them.
 
BioCorRob

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You are absolutely correct. I have been contemplating starting my own business for a long time. I can no longer be confined to a cubicle.

Both the President and VP at my last job had no degrees, just 50 years of experience between the two of them.
If I could give one piece of advice to you from someone who's done it relatively successfully, I'd say to "not quit your day job" just yet. Start your own business and do it as a side hustle until you can see some glimmer of hope that it will succeed. The only thing worse than a day job that you don't like is not having the pay coming in from the day job that you don't like because you quit too soon.

It may take you 2 or 3 tries before you find something to do self-employed that 1) makes you enough money to quit your day job and 2) that you enjoy doing. Keep the income coming in in the meantime to pay the bills. It make take you longer to get where you want to be, but the risk is significantly diminished.
 
rascal14

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I am in construction management and have worked on national historic landmarks throughout the country. I don't have a degree and it contributes to lower pay and less opportunity. With a degree I would be making 40% more overnight.

It matters
You should move companies. I have met many supers and PMs that don’t have degrees and make just as much as those that do.
 
dds

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The problem I see with a degree is that the market is flooded with them. In the states we have less people that can do the physical work.
 
rascal14

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The problem I see with a degree is that the market is flooded with them. In the states we have less people that can do the physical work.
There is a huge demand for trades workers and they can make a ton of money.
 
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There is a huge demand for trades workers and they can make a ton of money.
Very true. Im in construction part of a local union and you can literally jump right in after highschool. After about a year of apprenticeships you start at 60k. Meanwhile during the apprenticeship its about 35-40k. The best health, vision, dental, hearing insurance, pensions and annuities. Best part is not 1 cent of it comes from your paycheck. Someone just retired after 30 years at 55 with nearly $450,000 just in their annuity. And working up to become a super is easily accomplished
 
rascal14

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Yeah, I'm in construction management and there's almost as many managers needed as tradesmen, the whole industry needs workers. It is one of, if not the best industry to be in, I think. Even without a specific Construction degree puccah8808 you could try to apply as a Project Engineer or something similar if you were interested in that. It is long days, but the pay and benefits are amazing and it's almost never boring. Lol I've met many Project Managers with degrees in other things besides Construction Management.
 
BioCorRob

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The problem I see with a degree is that the market is flooded with them. In the states we have less people that can do the physical work.
I see this a lot, to be honest. Even in non-physical work situations. Our company has opportunities for sales reps and as an entry level position (as most sales rep positions are) is commission only to start. People with degrees are inquiring and wondering what the base salary is. I understand the desire for a salary, but from a sales perspective there's far more money to be made if you're good at sales on a commission structure. It's incredibly difficult for small businesses these days to offer salary, benefits, etc. with all of the other taxes, insurances, etc. that we're required to pay.

That's not to say you shouldn't get a degree, because I still think you should. The experiences and knowledge I gained in college - both inside and outside of class - are invaluable to me today. I'm only stating that in some cases, a degree just doesn't make sense for certain job types.

Hell, outside of the fitness industry I have seem some really ridiculous job postings... one of them was especially laughable. I believe it was for an "executive assistant" type position at an auto dealer if I'm not mistaken. Requirements for applying was a Masters degree in business. I was thinking to myself, who the hell is going to apply to be an executive assistant with a masters degree in business administration??
 
rascal14

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That reminds of me of the entry level positions that require a degree, but also 4-5 years experience.. Lol
 
toddmuelheim

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A bachelors degree is worth nowhere near what it used to be worth. If you aren’t planning on going to graduate or professional school, you should think long and hard about learning a trade or going into sales right out of HS. Not that it’s a hard fast rule, but spending over 100k and 4 years of income generating years so you can have an English literature hanging on your wall is not always the best financial move...
 
BioCorRob

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A bachelors degree is worth nowhere near what it used to be worth. If you aren’t planning on going to graduate or professional school, you should think long and hard about learning a trade or going into sales right out of HS. Not that it’s a hard fast rule, but spending over 100k and 4 years of income generating years so you can have an English literature hanging on your wall is not always the best financial move...
I'm actually a big fan of Mike Rowe, who pretty much said this exact same thing a few years back. I'm probably a tiny bit more leaning to the side of "get your degree" than he is, but for the most part I think what he says in terms of jobs is spot on.
 
booneman77

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I can 100% echo the "trades are the fast track to $" sentiment as well... I travel all over and every factory I go to is in desperate need of the next generation of skilled labor. Welders, machinists, inspectors, etc etc. Every place I go >90% of the skilled labor is within 5-10yrs of retirement. Its a societal expectation nowadays that everyone gets a 4yr degree and sits in a cube which has flooded the market with 20 something's with no experience, demanding 100k salaries and no real responsibility because they have a degree. Its the "millenial"-itis. As someone that's part of this generation too, it makes me sick because so many people look down on our generation as a whole becuase this is how they expect all of us to be; meanwhile, many are willing to work out on the shop floor and get dirty and put in the hours to move up to the cushy jobs.

I think there is an argument for both sides (the "require a degree" and "require experience") but I would 100% hire someone with experience and the right ATTITUDE long before I hired someone with a fancy degree. Some of the dumbest people I've worked with in my career have the fanciest degrees (including multiple doctorates). IMO getting a degree is important more to show a) that you can learn things and apply them and b) that you can dedicate yourself and your time to something. The actual application of what you learn from most colleges in most fields is actually only a VERY small % of what you truly do in the field. You learn the majority of your skills on the job and your ability to grow and evolve is what moves you forward.

Hell, i'm a prime example. I barely passed through college and last fall became the youngest lead consultant in my company's history. But I barely use what I went to school for and learned more in 3 months on the job than in 4+ years of college.

In short, degrees have a place, experience has a place, but to me, personalities, motivation, drive, ambition, commitment, and all the soft factors mean far more in the long term and a resume will never be able to showcase any of those things (unfortunately).
 
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I can 100% echo the "trades are the fast track to $" sentiment as well... I travel all over and every factory I go to is in desperate need of the next generation of skilled labor. Welders, machinists, inspectors, etc etc. Every place I go >90% of the skilled labor is within 5-10yrs of retirement. Its a societal expectation nowadays that everyone gets a 4yr degree and sits in a cube which has flooded the market with 20 something's with no experience, demanding 100k salaries and no real responsibility because they have a degree. Its the "millenial"-itis. As someone that's part of this generation too, it makes me sick because so many people look down on our generation as a whole becuase this is how they expect all of us to be; meanwhile, many are willing to work out on the shop floor and get dirty and put in the hours to move up to the cushy jobs.

I think there is an argument for both sides (the "require a degree" and "require experience") but I would 100% hire someone with experience and the right ATTITUDE long before I hired someone with a fancy degree. Some of the dumbest people I've worked with in my career have the fanciest degrees (including multiple doctorates). IMO getting a degree is important more to show a) that you can learn things and apply them and b) that you can dedicate yourself and your time to something. The actual application of what you learn from most colleges in most fields is actually only a VERY small % of what you truly do in the field. You learn the majority of your skills on the job and your ability to grow and evolve is what moves you forward.

Hell, i'm a prime example. I barely passed through college and last fall became the youngest lead consultant in my company's history. But I barely use what I went to school for and learned more in 3 months on the job than in 4+ years of college.

In short, degrees have a place, experience has a place, but to me, personalities, motivation, drive, ambition, commitment, and all the soft factors mean far more in the long term and a resume will never be able to showcase any of those things (unfortunately).
On point 1 zillion percent. I would take hard work and determination over a piece a paper that tells me you can study and pass tests. Im not saying thats easy but i guess im just the type of person who would rather be hands on. I was a mechanic for 10 years right out of high school now do construction and part of the build of the new MGM casino in springfield, ma. The feeling of having to sometimes get dirty and sweaty at work is worth it when you see an outcome that people enjoy and helps a community to thrive with the rest of the nation. Whether its a casino or a new hospital building that i also was apart of a few years back. I would 100% rather be apart of that then someone who sits in a cubicle and has to call someone to change their wifes flat tire because they dont know what physical works is.
 
puccah8808

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If I could give one piece of advice to you from someone who's done it relatively successfully, I'd say to "not quit your day job" just yet. Start your own business and do it as a side hustle until you can see some glimmer of hope that it will succeed. The only thing worse than a day job that you don't like is not having the pay coming in from the day job that you don't like because you quit too soon.

It may take you 2 or 3 tries before you find something to do self-employed that 1) makes you enough money to quit your day job and 2) that you enjoy doing. Keep the income coming in in the meantime to pay the bills. It make take you longer to get where you want to be, but the risk is significantly diminished.
Thank you and you are so right. I think I will venture out and start something. I got talked to by my boss today (second job). Apparently, I am too bossy and I make people feel like I’m talking down to them. Excuse me, but we’re all adults here. 1.) You should be doing your job so I don’t have to ask you why it has not been done. 2.) Why should I pick up your slack? And 3.) We’re fcuking adults here.

The problem I see with a degree is that the market is flooded with them. In the states we have less people that can do the physical work.
You are right. At school, almost everyone was getting a business degree. It’s so broad that it doesn’t seem to hold much value anymore.

Very true. Im in construction part of a local union and you can literally jump right in after highschool. After about a year of apprenticeships you start at 60k. Meanwhile during the apprenticeship its about 35-40k. The best health, vision, dental, hearing insurance, pensions and annuities. Best part is not 1 cent of it comes from your paycheck. Someone just retired after 30 years at 55 with nearly $450,000 just in their annuity. And working up to become a super is easily accomplished
That’s great! I don’t know where you’re at but in California, you have to wait a long time to get any seniority in the union. I do enjoy hands on work over a desk job. I worked in a warehouse for 8 years with only men. Less drama and competition.

Yeah, I'm in construction management and there's almost as many managers needed as tradesmen, the whole industry needs workers. It is one of, if not the best industry to be in, I think. Even without a specific Construction degree puccah8808 you could try to apply as a Project Engineer or something similar if you were interested in that. It is long days, but the pay and benefits are amazing and it's almost never boring. Lol I've met many Project Managers with degrees in other things besides Construction Management.
My friend is a project manager for one of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the world and she makes over $100k a year. I was looking into project management or at least getting a pmp (I think that’s what it is) certificate but working in group projects at school has tainted my perception of people (many adults are lazy, stupid a-holes).

I see this a lot, to be honest. Even in non-physical work situations. Our company has opportunities for sales reps and as an entry level position (as most sales rep positions are) is commission only to start. People with degrees are inquiring and wondering what the base salary is. I understand the desire for a salary, but from a sales perspective there's far more money to be made if you're good at sales on a commission structure. It's incredibly difficult for small businesses these days to offer salary, benefits, etc. with all of the other taxes, insurances, etc. that we're required to pay.

That's not to say you shouldn't get a degree, because I still think you should. The experiences and knowledge I gained in college - both inside and outside of class - are invaluable to me today. I'm only stating that in some cases, a degree just doesn't make sense for certain job types.

Hell, outside of the fitness industry I have seem some really ridiculous job postings... one of them was especially laughable. I believe it was for an "executive assistant" type position at an auto dealer if I'm not mistaken. Requirements for applying was a Masters degree in business. I was thinking to myself, who the hell is going to apply to be an executive assistant with a masters degree in business administration??
You are right! A guy I knew went from being a mechanic to a salesman at my old company and found out right away that it was harder than he thought. An executive assistant is just a fancy name for office assistant/ secretary. I asked a girl what her paralegal job consisted of and she said, “Oh, I’m just a secretary.” :/

A bachelors degree is worth nowhere near what it used to be worth. If you aren’t planning on going to graduate or professional school, you should think long and hard about learning a trade or going into sales right out of HS. Not that it’s a hard fast rule, but spending over 100k and 4 years of income generating years so you can have an English literature hanging on your wall is not always the best financial move...
My sister has an English degree and she’s a manager at a store. Not to knock her because nobody can ever take her degree away but it’s the reason why I decided to go to graduate school. I needed something more and people don’t really care about a bachelors anymore.

I can 100% echo the "trades are the fast track to $" sentiment as well... I travel all over and every factory I go to is in desperate need of the next generation of skilled labor. Welders, machinists, inspectors, etc etc. Every place I go >90% of the skilled labor is within 5-10yrs of retirement. Its a societal expectation nowadays that everyone gets a 4yr degree and sits in a cube which has flooded the market with 20 something's with no experience, demanding 100k salaries and no real responsibility because they have a degree. Its the "millenial"-itis. As someone that's part of this generation too, it makes me sick because so many people look down on our generation as a whole becuase this is how they expect all of us to be; meanwhile, many are willing to work out on the shop floor and get dirty and put in the hours to move up to the cushy jobs.

I think there is an argument for both sides (the "require a degree" and "require experience") but I would 100% hire someone with experience and the right ATTITUDE long before I hired someone with a fancy degree. Some of the dumbest people I've worked with in my career have the fanciest degrees (including multiple doctorates). IMO getting a degree is important more to show a) that you can learn things and apply them and b) that you can dedicate yourself and your time to something. The actual application of what you learn from most colleges in most fields is actually only a VERY small % of what you truly do in the field. You learn the majority of your skills on the job and your ability to grow and evolve is what moves you forward.

Hell, i'm a prime example. I barely passed through college and last fall became the youngest lead consultant in my company's history. But I barely use what I went to school for and learned more in 3 months on the job than in 4+ years of college.

In short, degrees have a place, experience has a place, but to me, personalities, motivation, drive, ambition, commitment, and all the soft factors mean far more in the long term and a resume will never be able to showcase any of those things (unfortunately).

Congrats on your promotion! :) I was waiting for you to reply cuz... I don’t know. I’ve always seen you as successful. :) You are absolutely correct. I would hire someone with a great personality and ambition over someone with a fancy degree. My previous boss has a degree in kinesiology but is a credit manager. She has over 20 years of experience in accounting over me, but to tell someone who graduated with an accounting degree that she knows nothing about accounting is bs. The accounting I learned in school is not the same as what I’ve learned on the job.

On point 1 zillion percent. I would take hard work and determination over a piece a paper that tells me you can study and pass tests. Im not saying thats easy but i guess im just the type of person who would rather be hands on. I was a mechanic for 10 years right out of high school now do construction and part of the build of the new MGM casino in springfield, ma. The feeling of having to sometimes get dirty and sweaty at work is worth it when you see an outcome that people enjoy and helps a community to thrive with the rest of the nation. Whether its a casino or a new hospital building that i also was apart of a few years back. I would 100% rather be apart of that then someone who sits in a cubicle and has to call someone to change their wifes flat tire because they dont know what physical works is.
I miss getting out there and working with my hands. Sitting at a desk job helped me gain tons of weight! Lol
 
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Thank you and you are so right. I think I will venture out and start something. I got talked to by my boss today (second job). Apparently, I am too bossy and I make people feel like I’m talking down to them. Excuse me, but we’re all adults here. 1.) You should be doing your job so I don’t have to ask you why it has not been done. 2.) Why should I pick up your slack? And 3.) We’re fcuking adults here.


You are right. At school, almost everyone was getting a business degree. It’s so broad that it doesn’t seem to hold much value anymore.


That’s great! I don’t know where you’re at but in California, you have to wait a long time to get any seniority in the union. I do enjoy hands on work over a desk job. I worked in a warehouse for 8 years with only men. Less drama and competition.


My friend is a project manager for one of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the world and she makes over $100k a year. I was looking into project management or at least getting a pmp (I think that’s what it is) certificate but working in group projects at school has tainted my perception of people (many adults are lazy, stupid a-holes).


You are right! A guy I knew went from being a mechanic to a salesman at my old company and found out right away that it was harder than he thought. An executive assistant is just a fancy name for office assistant/ secretary. I asked a girl what her paralegal job consisted of and she said, “Oh, I’m just a secretary.” :/


My sister has an English degree and she’s a manager at a store. Not to knock her because nobody can ever take her degree away but it’s the reason why I decided to go to graduate school. I needed something more and people don’t really care about a bachelors anymore.

Congrats on your promotion! :) I was waiting for you to reply cuz... I don’t know. I’ve always seen you as successful. :) You are absolutely correct. I would hire someone with a great personality and ambition over someone with a fancy degree. My previous boss has a degree in kinesiology but is a credit manager. She has over 20 years of experience in accounting over me, but to tell someone who graduated with an accounting degree that she knows nothing about accounting is bs. The accounting I learned in school is not the same as what I’ve learned on the job.



I miss getting out there and working with my hands. Sitting at a desk job helped me gain tons of weight! Lol
Thanks p! One of the best things I’ve realized is that finding the right people to be around can absolutely make a job or even a career. I’ve been lucky to stumble upon a few really smart and driven people in a variety of places who were both tough enough to push me but also helpful when they noticed I was struggling or didn’t know what to do.

I’ve had two bosses and one peer who between those 3 I basically model 90% of career choices and Work life around. What’s funny is that those same people are also the ones who I look up to the most for their work/life balance as well. They’re not even the smartest or highest ranking that I’ve met by a long shot but all 3 are extremely successful and have moved up through the ranks at will, but totally in their terms. I’ve seen 2 of the 3 turn down promotions and such because they didn’t see the value in taking on additional stress or getting into a position where they knew they had no control over their own path or ability to make a difference. That’s something I’ve really come to respect.
 
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Well my last two jobs My base salary has been higher than my peers bc of my degree and my current job it’s required. I also have a friend with no degree who makes double I do lol.

Oh and get your PMP. Today we had two candidates very similar resume and experience but the one with the PMP cert got the interview. It’ll help A LOT
 
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Who spends $100,000 on a bachelors degree? The government paid my tuition and actually gave me money through Pell grants which most people can get. I was working full time w kids and still managed to get the degree taking 3 classes a semester plus summer classes. In my opinion it was well worth it. If I go back to get my masters ill have to take out loans to pay for that but the financial bracket increase and what I could make would be worth it. Anything after a bachelors you can't get grants for.

I think it does help. I worked construction most of my life. I'm 40 now and honestly not something I wanted to do forever. And its not for everyone. But I prefer to use my mind over my body these days as my body just can't physically keep up with the things I did in my 20 s. Still do a lot of side work (carpentry) for extra income but its at my convenience.
 
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I’ve only been here 6 months and feel like that bro. Honestly didn’t expect to be learning about crypto for example, that thread has genuinely made me money I otherwise wouldn’t have.

The depth of knowledge AM members have, and the willingness to share it is awesome.
It's a family for sure! Enjoy what's to offer. :)
 

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