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HIIT training

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    Smile HIIT training


    Started HIIT training yesterday and wanted to get some feedback to make sure I have the right approach.

    Machine: Cybex ArcTrainer
    Duration: 18 mins
    60 sec - jog rate at about 120 strides per minute
    60 sec - sprint at about 195 strides per minute
    Repeat for another 16 mins

    Would appreciate some feedback on the timing intervals, rate, etc.

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    I do mine on a treadmill, but as far as intensity goes, mine will look typically like this:

    1-3 minutes of sprinting speed (as hard as I can possibly go)
    1 minute of walking speed

    After about 15 minutes or so I will lower the intensity a little bit (because I simply can't keep up with that intensity when I get this deep into the workout):

    1 minutes of sprinting speed
    1-2 minutes of a less intense sprint
    1 minute of walking speed (or 2 minutes of a light jogging speed)

    My workouts generally go for 30-45 minutes
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    You do HIIT for 30-45 mins?


    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    I do mine on a treadmill, but as far as intensity goes, mine will look typically like this:

    1-3 minutes of sprinting speed (as hard as I can possibly go)
    1 minute of walking speed

    After about 15 minutes or so I will lower the intensity a little bit (because I simply can't keep up with that intensity when I get this deep into the workout):

    1 minutes of sprinting speed
    1-2 minutes of a less intense sprint
    1 minute of walking speed (or 2 minutes of a light jogging speed)

    My workouts generally go for 30-45 minutes
    •   
       

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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    You do HIIT for 30-45 mins?
    Warning: I ramble....alot

    You'd better believe it. For me, 3 miles is a light day. I'll usually go for 4-5 miles, which will usually takes about 40 minutes. I'm a total cardio whore, like the Paris Hilton of Treadmills or something.

    IMO 18 minutes of cardio is hardly any cardio (how many calories do you expect to burn?). If 30 minutes of straight up HIIT is too much for you (don't feel bad, it took me years to build up to this capacity), it's not uncommon to do 15 minutes of HIIT followed by 15 minutes of normal cardio.

    In all actuality, you are more likely to burn (on average) more calories with normal cardio than with HIIT (in the same workout duration). Before someone calls me out on the above statement, I'll derive it from 2minute segments from each style:

    HIIT: 1 minute @ 12mph 1 minute @ 3 mph = Average speed= 7.5 mph

    Reg: 2 minutes @ 8mph Average Speed = 8.0 mph

    Since Work= Calories expended = Force * Speed * Time

    Force is related to your bodyweight (which is constant). Time will be constant (we are comparing two workouts of the same duration) Thus, the average speed will be the deciding factor in determining how many calories you burn.


    That being said, it's not that HIIT burns more calories per hour, but more calories from fat stores due to the way it recruits energy.

    I hope you're still awake, and this makes sense.

    thesinner
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    I do my HIIT at a more relaxed pace, I do 45s hard and then about 1min 45 relaxed . I do that about 7 or 8 times with 3 minutes leading into it as a warmup and about 4 or 5 minutes cool down. That takes about 20-25 minutes, and if I have more time I prefer to do a 40-60 long workout on the elliptical. Time is always short for me in university
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    Here is some great info I came across regarding HIIT:

    "For years, we've been told low-intensity aerobic exercise is the best method for ridding the body of excess fat. I'm here to tell you that's not the case. You knew deep down, anyhow, that busting your butt burned off more fat than an exercise that allowed you to read at the same time, didn't you? Well, research shows our instincts were right.

    The reason this low-effort theory of aerobic exercise came about is a study showed low-intensity exercise burns a greater percentage of calories from fat as opposed to carbs; however, when high-intensity exercise is practiced, the research showed the percentage of fuel from carbs is increased, while the amount of fat utilized is greater than or equal to that burned during low-intensity exercise.

    In research, HIIT has been shown to burn adipose tissue more effectively than low-intensity exercise—up to 50% more efficiently!3 In other words, HIIT speeds up your metabolism and keeps it revved up for some time after your workout. The bottom line is HIIT training burns a greater number of total calories than low-intensity training, and more calories burned equals more fat lost. What I'm suggesting is you forget about the "calories burned" readout on the stairstepper or Lifecycle; if you practice HIIT training, the majority of calories burned will come after your workout!

    Another reason low-intensity training became popular is the average, where's-my-remote-control American has no tolerance for high-intensity training. But, of course, if you're a weight trainer, high intensity is a part of life."



    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    Warning: I ramble....alot

    You'd better believe it. For me, 3 miles is a light day. I'll usually go for 4-5 miles, which will usually takes about 40 minutes. I'm a total cardio whore, like the Paris Hilton of Treadmills or something.

    IMO 18 minutes of cardio is hardly any cardio (how many calories do you expect to burn?). If 30 minutes of straight up HIIT is too much for you (don't feel bad, it took me years to build up to this capacity), it's not uncommon to do 15 minutes of HIIT followed by 15 minutes of normal cardio.

    In all actuality, you are more likely to burn (on average) more calories with normal cardio than with HIIT (in the same workout duration). Before someone calls me out on the above statement, I'll derive it from 2minute segments from each style:

    HIIT: 1 minute @ 12mph 1 minute @ 3 mph = Average speed= 7.5 mph

    Reg: 2 minutes @ 8mph Average Speed = 8.0 mph

    Since Work= Calories expended = Force * Speed * Time

    Force is related to your bodyweight (which is constant). Time will be constant (we are comparing two workouts of the same duration) Thus, the average speed will be the deciding factor in determining how many calories you burn.


    That being said, it's not that HIIT burns more calories per hour, but more calories from fat stores due to the way it recruits energy.

    I hope you're still awake, and this makes sense.

    thesinner
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    Sorry for all the info, but came across this and it really clarifies the difference between true HIIT training and cardio. ENJOY!

    "Here's what I'm proposing: commit eight measly weeks of your bodybuilding life to shedding excess fat and see if you don't look and feel a ton better. If you don't like the idea of doing aerobics, I understand your reluctance. I have good news for you. I've discovered a "better way" to burn off that unwanted bodyfat. And it takes only 4 to 15 minutes a day! If you think it's something you can deal with, then try sticking with it, and I bet you'll be wearing tank tops to the gym in no time. After all, the leaner you get, the bigger you look.

    One of the great things about HIIT training is it can be applied to all sorts of activities—in or out of the gym. Personally, I like running stairs or sprinting, but it can also be done on a stationary bicycle, a stairstepper, or any activity where you can alternate periods of high intensity with periods of low intensity.

    The following outline is a general routine for boosting fat loss, one that's worked well for me. Of course, you'll have to develop at your own pace according to your level of cardiovascular fitness. If you follow the program properly, three or four HIIT sessions a week should produce significant fat-burning effects. To prevent overtraining, try to incorporate the program on your weight training "off days." Your HIIT program will likely be most effective if performed first thing in the morning on an empty stomach, but if you can't do it in the a.m., do it at noon, night, whenever!

    Let's assume you're going to apply HIIT training to running sprints or stairs, like I do. I work in intervals. For instance, I'll jog for a set amount of time, sprint for a set amount of time, followed by more jogging, more sprinting, and so on, until I've trained for a certain amount of time. Every other workout, you'll add another minute to your HIIT session. For instance, your first two HIIT sessions during week one will each take only four minutes. On the third workout of week 1, you'll add another 30-second sprint followed by a 30-second jog. Every other workout thereafter, you'll add another minute's worth of HIIT training until finally, by the end of week 8, you'll be doing a 15-minute HIIT session.

    Of course, depending on your age, level of fitness, and how badly you want it, you'll periodically have to replace one of the jogging or sprint intervals with a brisk walk. After the 30- or 60-second "break," your heart rate will hopefully come back down off the ceiling, and you'll be ready to resume your sprint and jog intervals.

    Let's say I'm just beginning. I'll put on my sweats and Nikes and grab my stopwatch and head out to the track. Table 1 indicates I'm supposed to begin with one 4-minute cycle.

    There. That's it. Only four minutes! That's all for the day! After doing this same program twice the first week, I'll add another 60 seconds to my HIIT training. Every third HIIT workout is a little more intense, requiring that I add an additional 30-second sprint and an additional 30-second jog. No matter, by this time, my heart and lungs are starting to handle it.

    As the weeks go by, I'll gradually add more and more minutes to my HIIT training, until finally, at the end of week 8, I'll be doing 15 minutes nonstop. By that time, the lines between my abs will be so deep I'll have to periodically clean the lint out with a Q-tip. (So that's where I dropped my car keys!)

    The important thing to remember is sprinting is a very intense exercise. If you haven't tried to sprint for 30 seconds since you were a kid, you're in for a shock. Don't take off like you're doing a 40-yard dash. A groundskeeper will likely bury you on the spot where you collapse. Thirty seconds of sprinting should get you close to halfway around a quarter-mile track. Although you should ultimately strive to push yourself to run at 90% of your maximum, pace yourself as necessary in the beginning. "
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post

    My workouts generally go for 30-45 minutes
    That's a incredibly long time to be doing hitt. What HR ranges do you work in?

    Cardiovascular wise you must have incredible stamina.

    Few years back I was doing HITT intervals for 30 minutes on eliptical or treadmill. I was in insane shape at the time. I could even down 10 beers and beat most of the people I knew in a foot race. I was 190lbs at the time to. A lot of weight moving that fast.Felt like I was gonna have a heart attack with the alcohol in me though.. lol.
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    Not sure what my heart rates are during my workout

    I know my resting heart rate is below 50 though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    Not sure what my heart rates are during my workout

    I know my resting heart rate is below 50 though.
    I've always used a HR monitor. When your in those 90% HR max zones it gets pretty insane.

    Low resting HR. That's awesome!
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    Shouldn't HIIT be limited to 18 mins or so?



    Quote Originally Posted by Flaw View Post
    That's a incredibly long time to be doing hitt. What HR ranges do you work in?

    Cardiovascular wise you must have incredible stamina.

    Few years back I was doing HITT intervals for 30 minutes on eliptical or treadmill. I was in insane shape at the time. I could even down 10 beers and beat most of the people I knew in a foot race. I was 190lbs at the time to. A lot of weight moving that fast.Felt like I was gonna have a heart attack with the alcohol in me though.. lol.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    Shouldn't HIIT be limited to 18 mins or so?
    It really all depends on what goals you have. Most info on HIIT training recommends 18 to 20 minutes. This is a starting point for people who read certain books (BFL and??).

    In my opinion, the the process behind this is to get people active (even low levels of HIIT are far more active than most Americans these days), and to keep them from becoming so tired and sore they skip their next workout or two.

    I've had great success with 20 minute HIIT. I actually started off from a very bad spot conditioning wise and ended up getting into great shape (lost 25lbs.).

    In a nutshell: You can take two approaches to HIIT.

    1. Pick a starting point and keep the trainging length the same. As this becomes easier, pick up the intensity through out the duration of the time.

    2. Pick a starting point and as you find that 20 minutes becomes easy, add more time!

    Hope that helped a little
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timius View Post
    In a nutshell: You can take two approaches to HIIT.

    1. Pick a starting point and keep the trainging length the same. As this becomes easier, pick up the intensity through out the duration of the time.

    2. Pick a starting point and as you find that 20 minutes becomes easy, add more time!

    Hope that helped a little
    3. As you get into it, you can increase both intensity and duration since stamina and power (speed) will both increase the more you train this way.

    I find I get great results when I "wing it" with my HIIT routines. When I find myself having to grab onto the side bars, that's a sign that it's time to stop or lower the intensity of that interval.
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    Exactly, with HIIT you should be doing alternate intervals of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise with periods of near-maximum effort (90% of your max). After about 18 mins of the intervals, you should barely be able to finish the last one; if you can, increase the intensity. For what it says as the calories burned is of little concern as the bulk of the calories burned will occur after you leave the gym.






    Quote Originally Posted by Timius View Post
    It really all depends on what goals you have. Most info on HIIT training recommends 18 to 20 minutes. This is a starting point for people who read certain books (BFL and??).

    In my opinion, the the process behind this is to get people active (even low levels of HIIT are far more active than most Americans these days), and to keep them from becoming so tired and sore they skip their next workout or two.

    I've had great success with 20 minute HIIT. I actually started off from a very bad spot conditioning wise and ended up getting into great shape (lost 25lbs.).

    In a nutshell: You can take two approaches to HIIT.

    1. Pick a starting point and keep the trainging length the same. As this becomes easier, pick up the intensity through out the duration of the time.

    2. Pick a starting point and as you find that 20 minutes becomes easy, add more time!

    Hope that helped a little
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    Shouldn't HIIT be limited to 18 mins or so?
    You would have to work your way up to 30 minutes. When I say I was in incredible shape I didn't start out at 30 minute hitt sessions.

    I started out at 10, 15, 20, so on.. took awhile to get there. It's a progression.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flaw View Post
    took awhile to get there. It's a progression.
    Exactly
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    Definitely, however to gain the benefit I am looking for, going to max it out at no more than 20 mins as the benefits I am after is what will occur after leaving the gym, not the actual calories burned while performing the HIIT routine.

    HIIT isn't cardio and cardio isn't HIIT...two totally different approaches, intentions, and results. Did some searches even on this board and seems many have the impressive that HIIT is a cardio workout...definitely not the case nor for what HIIT is intended.


    Quote Originally Posted by Flaw View Post
    You would have to work your way up to 30 minutes. When I say I was in incredible shape I didn't start out at 30 minute hitt sessions.

    I started out at 10, 15, 20, so on.. took awhile to get there. It's a progression.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    Definitely, however to gain the benefit I am looking for, going to max it out at no more than 20 mins as the benefits I am after is what will occur after leaving the gym, not the actual calories burned while performing the HIIT routine.

    HIIT isn't cardio and cardio isn't HIIT...two totally different approaches, intentions, and results. Did some searches even on this board and seems many have the impressive that HIIT is a cardio workout...definitely not the case nor for what HIIT is intended.
    If you wanted to increase your RMB, I would imagine doing deadlifts, squats, or cleans for 18minutes would be a much more effective approach.

    Last I checked, HIIT (for the cases of burning fat at least, since it was historically used as speed training for runners) is employed as a means of quickly burning up stored energies (ATP, ADP, Creatine, and glucose) to avoid use of glycogen as done with normal High-intensity Cardio.
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    Exactly...as I mentioned before, think this is a good summation:

    "HIIT has been shown to burn adipose tissue more effectively than low-intensity exercise—up to 50% more efficiently!3 In other words, HIIT speeds up your metabolism and keeps it revved up for some time after your workout. The bottom line is HIIT training burns a greater number of total calories than low-intensity training, and more calories burned equals more fat lost. What I'm suggesting is you forget about the "calories burned" readout on the stairstepper or Lifecycle; if you practice HIIT training, the majority of calories burned will come after your workout!"



    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    If you wanted to increase your RMB, I would imagine doing deadlifts, squats, or cleans for 18minutes would be a much more effective approach.

    Last I checked, HIIT (for the cases of burning fat at least, since it was historically used as speed training for runners) is employed as a means of quickly burning up stored energies (ATP, ADP, Creatine, and glucose) to avoid use of glycogen as done with normal High-intensity Cardio.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    Definitely, however to gain the benefit I am looking for, going to max it out at no more than 20 mins as the benefits I am after is what will occur after leaving the gym, not the actual calories burned while performing the HIIT routine.

    HIIT isn't cardio and cardio isn't HIIT...two totally different approaches, intentions, and results. Did some searches even on this board and seems many have the impressive that HIIT is a cardio workout...definitely not the case nor for what HIIT is intended.

    I disagree, cardio really depends on what your training for. Intervals are pretty much the same as HIIT, and are used to train the body to help recuperate faster between bouts of intense exercise.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    Definitely, however to gain the benefit I am looking for, going to max it out at no more than 20 mins as the benefits I am after is what will occur after leaving the gym, not the actual calories burned while performing the HIIT routine.

    HIIT isn't cardio and cardio isn't HIIT...two totally different approaches, intentions, and results. Did some searches even on this board and seems many have the impressive that HIIT is a cardio workout...definitely not the case nor for what HIIT is intended.
    If you wanna burn the most cals from fat you do the highest intensities possible in the shortest amount of time. If your totally exhausted after 10 minutes then it's all good. You will be burning a good amount of fat hours after the routine. Regular cardiovascular exercise does not do much for burning fat long after it's done. It's more of a calorie burn in general.
    “Lord, whom shall we go away to? You have sayings of everlasting life"- John 6:68

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    Totally agree, just meant they have two different purposes and all depends what you are really after.


    Quote Originally Posted by rugger48 View Post
    I disagree, cardio really depends on what your training for. Intervals are pretty much the same as HIIT, and are used to train the body to help recuperate faster between bouts of intense exercise.
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    Exactly

    Quote Originally Posted by Flaw View Post
    If you wanna burn the most cals from fat you do the highest intensities possible in the shortest amount of time. If your totally exhausted after 10 minutes then it's all good. You will be burning a good amount of fat hours after the routine. Regular cardiovascular exercise does not do much for burning fat long after it's done. It's more of a calorie burn in general.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatburner2007 View Post
    Totally agree, just meant they have two different purposes and all depends what you are really after.

    gotcha
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    Gotta say I love HIIT cardio. I love how it spares my muslce but after my weight training low intensity is the way to go.
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    So you are doing HIIT on some days and low cardio on others?

    I am doing HIIT 3-4 times per week for about 18 mins and doing it right after my weight routine.

    Quote Originally Posted by jminis View Post
    Gotta say I love HIIT cardio. I love how it spares my muslce but after my weight training low intensity is the way to go.
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    Why are you doing HIIT right after lifting? By that point in time you should have low enough glycogen that you could get away with doing a light cardio for 20-30mins.

    I mean, it's just my opinion, but I would recommend doing HIIT on off-days.
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    Doing the following:

    Monday:
    Chest, HIIT

    Tuesday:
    Back, Abs

    Wednesday:
    Shoulders, HIIT

    Thursday:
    Legs, Abs

    Friday:
    Arms, HIIT


    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post
    Why are you doing HIIT right after lifting? By that point in time you should have low enough glycogen that you could get away with doing a light cardio for 20-30mins.

    I mean, it's just my opinion, but I would recommend doing HIIT on off-days.
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesinner View Post

    In all actuality, you are more likely to burn (on average) more calories with normal cardio than with HIIT (in the same workout duration). Before someone calls me out on the above statement, I'll derive it from 2minute segments from each style:

    HIIT: 1 minute @ 12mph 1 minute @ 3 mph = Average speed= 7.5 mph

    Reg: 2 minutes @ 8mph Average Speed = 8.0 mph

    Since Work= Calories expended = Force * Speed * Time

    Force is related to your bodyweight (which is constant). Time will be constant (we are comparing two workouts of the same duration) Thus, the average speed will be the deciding factor in determining how many calories you burn.


    That being said, it's not that HIIT burns more calories per hour, but more calories from fat stores due to the way it recruits energy.

    I hope you're still awake, and this makes sense.

    thesinner
    Just to go on furthur on your equation...

    Speed * Time = Distance

    So in the end, W = Force * Distance (W=Fd)

    So, if you really want to burn the most calories, just go the most distance that you can running, walking, or sprinting. I think the purpose of HIIT is to burn up only glycogen, hence the 18 minute suggestion. I'm sure there's more involved in mechanical and metabolic efficiency which is probably why HIIT is a good idea. It may not burn as much calories, but the fat burning potential is higher.

    When you are working near your maximum heartrate, a lot of your calories are coming from lactic fermenation which is very inefficient, but effective way to use glycogen. I think it yields like 4 ATP per glucose molecule. When you're just jogging along and have enough oxygen (aerobic) your body can do the oxidative phosphorylation and get like 34 or something ATP per glucose molecule.

    Just a little more pseudo-science for you guys (I don't claim to know what I'm talking about). When you deplete glycogen stores, your body is going to be throwing everything in the furnace so to speak. This is when it gets catabolic and you start using protein for energy. If I were to recommend HIIT I would say do it in the afternoon on non-workout days. That way it will burn up all of your free floating glycogen and then when you're done and go home, your body will have the time to prepare fat for use in oxidative phosphorylation. If I understand this correctly, its kind of similar to ketogenesis. I would use it to quickly "burn" up glycogen and let the ketogenesis occur for the next couple of hours while I sleep. Also, I wouldn't want to eat any carbs afterwards to enjoy the full benefits. The same idea, just different is to not eat carbs before dinner. That way, when you sleep, you don't have free circulating glycogen, and your body must use fat for energy.

    This is just how I understand it with my limited basic biology and physics knowledge.
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    I've hacked that last thread to pieces. What it comes down to is that the HIIT burns more calories because it uses glycogen less effectively, so therefore, you have to use more to do the same work. Also, HIIT sets your body up for ketogenesis by depleting glycogen stores.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebs View Post
    I've hacked that last thread to pieces. What it comes down to is that the HIIT burns more calories because it uses glycogen less effectively, so therefore, you have to use more to do the same work. Also, HIIT sets your body up for ketogenesis by depleting glycogen stores.
    **More FAT calories. A lot of the time you will burn more overall calories if you were to run at a constant pace than in intervals.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebs View Post
    I've hacked that last thread to pieces. What it comes down to is that the HIIT burns more calories because it uses glycogen less effectively, so therefore, you have to use more to do the same work. Also, HIIT sets your body up for ketogenesis by depleting glycogen stores.
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