No More Sugar (For You Bobo)

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    No More Sugar (For You Bobo)


    Global health group: Slash sugar intake
    Experts want no more than 10 percent of calories from sugar
    Monday, March 3, 2003 Posted: 1:55 PM EST (1855 GMT)



    BOLD ADVICE
    There are few international guidelines on sugar intake. But a new report by two U.N. agencies said people should restrict their consumption of added sugar to below 10 percent of calories.

    U.S. dietary guidelines advise only moderation for sugar.

    The Institute of Medicine recently made a recommendation that sugar make up to 25 percent of calories.


    LONDON, England (AP) -- People should get no more than 10 percent of their calories from sugar, experts say in a major new report Monday on how to stem the global epidemic of obesity-linked diseases.

    The study is the most significant in more than a decade on what the world should be doing about its diet. Although concerns about sugar intake are not new, very few experts have recommended a specific limit.

    The food industry immediately decried the document, insisting more exercise is the key to ending obesity.

    The report was commissioned by two U.N. agencies, the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization, and compiled by a panel of 30 international experts.

    The experts say heart disease, diabetes and other diseases that can be caused by poor diet and lack of exercise are no longer just the preserve of the Western world.

    The report underlines what doctors have been saying for years -- that along with regular exercise, a diet low in fatty, sugary and salty food is key to staying healthy.

    The experts recommend one hour of daily exercise, double the amount recommended by the U.S. government but the same as that endorsed by other establishments.

    And their recommendations on how much fat, grains, protein, salt and fruits and vegetables people should eat also were in line with prevailing opinion.

    But when it came to sugar, their advice was some of the boldest yet.

    The experts said people should restrict their consumption of added sugar -- including sugar from honey, syrups and fruit juices -- to below 10 percent of calories.

    In the United States, which leads the world in obesity, the government's Dietary Guidelines for Americans advise only that sugar should be used in moderation. The Institute of Medicine, part of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, recommended in September that sugar could make up to 25 percent of calories.

    "There are very few international recommendations on sugar. There are countries that are trying to develop recommendations on sugar, but every time they introduce them, the pressure from industry-led groups is very high," said Derek Yach, chief of non-communicable diseases at the World Health Organization.

    Epidemic around the world
    Philip James, chairman of the International Obesity Task Force and one of the scientists on the panel, said the report presents the food industry with one of its biggest challenges.

    "Despite all the attempts so far to increase the provision of healthier choices over the last 10 or more years, obesity rates have accelerated," he said. "The food industry must now sit down with WHO and others to work out how to seriously address this issue and become part of the solution rather than remaining part of the problem."

    Rapid changes in diets and lifestyles resulting from industrialization, urbanization, economic development and global food trade have accelerated during the last decade, the report said.

    That has meant improved standards of living in poorer countries, but also has led to inappropriate shifts in eating and exercise patterns and a corresponding increase in diet-related chronic diseases, the experts found.

    Scientists predict that heart disease will be the leading cause of death in developing countries by the end of the decade. Obesity rates are also increasing more rapidly in developing countries than in rich nations, and two-thirds of the people with type 2 diabetes -- the type related to bad eating and exercise habits -- live in the developing world.

    The U.S. National Soft Drink Association said that a 10 percent limit on sugar should not be part of the plan.

    "A thorough review of scientific literature on the subject of obesity shows there is no association between sugar consumption and obesity," said Richard Adamson, the association's vice president of scientific and technical affairs.

    "Study after study shows that restricting foods or food ingredients won't work. In fact, it can create a 'forbidden fruit syndrome' that causes individuals to gain weight," Adamson said. "Together, we need to educate people about consuming all foods and beverages in moderation and getting more active."

    The Grocery Manufacturers of America, the world's largest association of food, beverage and consumer product companies, also objected to the targeting of sugar. It maintained that all foods can be part of a healthy diet when eaten in moderation and combined with the right amount of physical activity.

    Starting next week, WHO officials will be meeting health authorities from around the world to discuss how governments plan to respond to the recommendations. A similar meeting is planned with food industry officials in May.

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    heheh... *whisper* I see fat people....


    Fat and sugar: an economic analysis.

    Drewnowski A.

    Center for Public Health Nutrition, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195.

    As incomes rise, the share of income spent on food decreases. To Engel's law should be added the observation that the diet structure changes as well. Incomes and the macronutrient composition of the diet are linked at the aggregate and-most likely-the individual level. People in higher income nations consume more added sugars and fats than do people in lower income nations. Lower income consumers within rich nations consume lower-quality diets than do higher income consumers. The lowering of energy costs ($/MJ) through technological innovation has been most marked for foods containing added sugars and fat. Although wealthier persons in poor nations are more likely to be overweight, obesity in the United States is associated with lower incomes. Obesity in the United States and similar societies may be a socioeconomic, as opposed to a medical, problem and one that is related to diet structure and diet costs.

    ---------------

    Size makes a difference.

    Matthiessen J, ***t S, Biltoft-Jensen A, Beck AM, Ovesen L.

    Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition, Morkhoj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Soborg.

    OBJECTIVE:: To elucidate status and trends in portion size of foods rich in fat and/or added sugars during the past decades, and to bring portion size into perspective in its role in obesity and dietary guidelines in Denmark. DATA SOURCES:: Information about portion sizes of low-fat and full-fat food items was obtained from a 4-day weighed food record (Study 1). Trends in portion sizes of commercial foods were examined by gathering information from major food manufacturers and fast food chains (Study 2). Data on intakes and sales of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and confectionery were obtained through nation-wide dietary surveys and official sales statistics (Study 3). RESULTS:: Study 1: Subjects ate and drank significantly more when they chose low-fat food and meal items (milk used as a drink, sauce and sliced cold meat), compared with their counterparts who chose food and meal items with a higher fat content. As a result, almost the same amounts of energy and fat were consumed both ways, with the exception of sliced cold meat (energy and fat) and milk (fat). Study 2: Portion sizes of commercial energy-dense foods and beverages, and fast food meals rich in fat and/or added sugars, seem to have increased over time, and in particular in the last 10 years. Study 3: The development in portion sizes of commercial foods has been paralleled by a sharp increase of more than 50% in the sales of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and confectionery like sweets, chocolate and ice creams since the 1970s. CONCLUSIONS:: Larger portion sizes of foods low in fat and commercial energy-dense foods and beverages could be important factors in maintaining a high energy intake, causing over-consumption and enhancing the prevalence of obesity in the population. In light of this development, portion size ought to take central place in dietary guidelines and public campaigns.
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    Originally posted by YellowJacket


    BOLD ADVICE
    There are few international guidelines on sugar intake. But a new report by two U.N. agencies said people should restrict their consumption of added sugar to below 10 percent of calories.

    That says it right there. I hate the U.N.

    Plus it says you should restrict fruit, honey, etc... which is dumb.

    "The Grocery Manufacturers of America, the world's largest association of food, beverage and consumer product companies, also objected to the targeting of sugar. It maintained that all foods can be part of a healthy diet when eaten in moderation and combined with the right amount of physical activity. "

    Hmmmm....wonder why..... $$$$
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    Sugar Intake Hit All-time High in 1999
    Government Urged to Recommend Sugar Limits
    WASHINGTON - Citing new figures that show that in 1999 Americans ate more sugar than ever before, the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) is urging the federal government to advise consumers to limit their sugar intake. According to new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) data, sugar consumption in 1999 was 158 pounds per person — 30 percent higher than in 1983. Consumption has risen every year but one since 1983.

    “USDA’s ‘Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ should advise consumers to ‘limit their intake of added sugars,’” said Michael F. Jacobson, executive director of the nonprofit CSPI. “Eating large amounts of soft drinks, candy, and other sugary foods squeezes healthier foods out of some people’s diets and promotes obesity in some people.”

    A new version of “Dietary Guidelines” is set for release on May 30th. The food industry contends that the huge increase in sugar consumption has had no impact on health.

    In a paper published earlier this year, USDA researcher Shanthy A. Bowman, of the Agricultural Research Service, reported that heavier consumers of refined sugars (more than 18 percent of calories from added sugars) typically consume more calories but less of 15 different nutrients than do lighter consumers (under 12 percent of calories). The high consumers consumed 15 times more soft drinks and fruit ades per day than the lower consumers.

    USDA has stated that the average American, who consumes about 2,000 calories per day, can eat up to 10 teaspoons of added sugars, if he or she eats a healthful diet containing all the recommended servings of fruits, dairy products, and other foods. In fact, though, the average American is not eating that healthful diet and consumes 20 teaspoons per day of sugar.

    The 158-pound figure — equivalent to about 50 teaspoons per day — represents the amount of sugar that is available in wholesale channels. The actual amount consumed is considerably less. USDA surveys indicate that the average teenage boy eats at least 109 pounds per year, while the average American eats upwards of 64 pounds.

    Because of the sharp increase in sugar consumption — paralleled by a doubling in the rate of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in the past 20 years — CSPI and other health groups petitioned the Food and Drug Administration in 1999 to set a “Daily Value” for sugar intake and list on food labels the amount of added sugars and the “% Daily Value” in a serving. CSPI recommended that the Daily Value — the recommended daily limit — be set at 40 grams, or 10 teaspoons, the figure recommended by USDA. The FDA has not responded to the petition.

    The 1999 figure for added-sugars consumption is 1.5 percent greater than in 1998. “Added sugars” includes table sugar (cane and beet; sucrose), corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, corn sugar (glucose), honey, and others. It does not include the sugars in milk, fruit, and vegetables, of which Americans should be consuming more, because of the nutrients in those foods.

    Increasing sugar intake and obesity will be discussed at the upcoming National Nutrition Summit, which is sponsored by USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services. It is being held in Washington on May 30-31. CSPI’s Jacobson and nutrition policy director Margo Wootan are chairing panels.

    Interestingly, in 1986 the Food and Drug Administration predicted that sugar consumption would level off and then decline in the next few years.

    [CSPI U.S.]
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    “America: Drowning in Sugar”
    Experts Call for Food Labels to Disclose Added Sugars

    WASHINGTON - The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and dozens of leading health experts and organizations today petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to require that food labels declare how much sugar is added to soft drinks, ice cream, and other foods.

    The petition also asks the FDA to set a maximum recommended daily intake (Daily Value) for added sugars and require labels to disclose the percentage of the Daily Value a food provides.

    Michael Jacobson, executive director of CSPI, said today at a Washington press conference, "Sugar consumption has been going through the roof. It has increased by 28 percent since 1983, fueling soaring obesity rates and other health problems. It's vital that the FDA require labels that would enable consumers to monitor—and reduce—their sugar intake."

    Marion Nestle, chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University, said, "Because sugary foods often replace more healthful foods, diets high in sugar are almost certainly contributing to osteoporosis, cancer, and heart disease. It's high time that the food label informed consumers of a food's contribution to a recommended limit for added sugars." Nestle was managing editor of the 1988 Surgeon General's Report on Diet and Health.

    United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) surveys show that sugar consumption has increased almost every year since 1982. Most of that sugar came from cane and beet sugar and corn syrup and corn sugar. Much of the increase was due to the consumption of soft drinks.

    "Health officials must take prudent action to stem the dilution of the American diet with sugar's empty calories. Declaring on food labels the amount of added sugars would help consumers cut the sugar and improve their diets," said Mohammad Akhter, the executive director of the American Public Health Association.

    USDA advises people who eat a 2,000-calorie healthful diet to try to limit themselves to about 10 teaspoons of added sugars per day. In fact, the average American does not eat a healthful diet, but consumes 20 teaspoons of added sugars per day.

    A teenage male who eats a healthful diet could eat about 18 teaspoons of added sugars, according to USDA. Most teenage males do not eat a healthful diet, because they consume an average of 34 teaspoons of sugar per day.

    CSPI is asking the FDA to adopt USDA's figure of 10 teaspoons (40 grams) as the Daily Value for added sugars. Daily Values are used on Nutrition Facts labels to indicate the recommended maximum intakes of fat, sodium, and other nutrients.

    Many individual foods provide large fractions of the USDA's recommended sugar limits. For instance, a typical cup of fruit yogurt provides 70 percent of a day's worth of added sugar; a cup of regular ice cream provides 60 percent, a 12-ounce Pepsi provides 103 percent, a Hostess Lemon Fruit Pie provides 115 percent, a serving of Kellogg's Marshmallow Blasted Froot Loops provides 40 percent, and a quarter-cup of pancake syrup provides 103 percent.

    While restaurant foods are not required to provide nutrition labeling, CSPI found that a Cinnabon provides 123 percent of USDA's recommended target, a large McDonald's Shake 120 percent, a large Mr. Misty Slush at Dairy Queen 280 percent, and Burger King's Cini-minis with icing 95 percent. One of the biggest problems with high-sugar foods is that they replace more healthful foods. According to USDA data, people who eat diets high in sugar get less calcium, fiber, folate, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, magnesium, iron, and other nutrients. They also consume fewer fruits and vegetables.

    "If you're drinking soda pop instead of lowfat milk or orange juice, or eating a candy bar instead of a piece of fruit, you're missing a chance to cut your risk of osteoporosis, cancer, or heart disease," said Bonnie Liebman, CSPI nutrition director.

    In a letter to the FDA, the goals of CSPI's 71-page petition were supported by 39 organizations, ranging from the American Public Health Association and former Surgeon General Koop's Shape Up America! to the YMCA and the Girl Scouts of America. The campaign is also supported by 33 experts on obesity, heart disease, and dental caries, including George L. Blackburn, Associate Professor in Nutrition Medicine at Harvard Medical School; Kelly D. Brownell, Professor of Psychology, Epidemiology, and Public Health at Yale University; and Isobel R. Contento, Professor and Coordinator of the Program in Nutrition and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.


    [CSPI U.S.]
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    Nice...Ive posted both of them here

    But all good points, combined with computers, TVs, Playstation 2's and worthless parents, thousands and kids will eventually die of heart attacks, strokes, cardiovascular disease, etc.
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    Originally posted by YellowJacket
    Nice...Ive posted both of them here

    But all good points, combined with computers, TVs, Playstation 2's and worthless parents, thousands and kids will eventually die of heart attacks, strokes, cardiovascular disease, etc.
    True. Combing that with eating bag of chips and Mountain Dew...

    One big FAT nation....
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    As their punishment, we should starve everyone of them into Ketosis.
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    Originally posted by YellowJacket
    As their punishment, we should starve everyone of them into Ketosis.
    THey would lose weight. They don't deserve that. .
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    hmm.... I can see it now, "Teens In the New Century, The Veal of the Nation" ..... soylent green?
  

  
 

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