My Pet Theory of Ideal Weight Loss Regimen; Critique?

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    My Pet Theory of Ideal Weight Loss Regimen; Critique?


    Hi Everyone,

    Right now, I'm thinking of the ideal weight loss regimen. Feel free to support or refute my current thoughts:

    1. Take Measurements

    Even though there are many ways to do so here are what I consider essentials:

    a. Bodyweight
    b. Bodyfat percentage (using an accurate measure like a BodPod or calipers)
    c. Max bench, squat, powerclean
    d. One mile run time
    e. Flexiblity/Range of Motion

    2. Set Goals

    In our case, it seems to be to maintain muscle mass and lose fat.

    3. Supplements:

    Three supplements I believe to be safe (when used as directed), effective (when used as recommended) and cost-effective are:

    a. Any stimulant

    (Caffeine is the best, legal supplement and is in most weight loss products). While some athletes use other supplements (such as xanthines, etc.), I still think it's best to stick with legal, proven alternatives in proven safe doses.

    b. Creatine

    (Creatine monohydrate is proven just as good as more expensive "designer" creatines, says Will Brink's "creatine graveyard"). To load or not to load, pre or post workout, or with or without simple sugars are up for debate and largely irrelevant.

    c. Hormonal boosters (namely testosterone and growth hormone)

    This one seems the most controversial. Of course, it would be wisest to do things the legal way and see a specialized doctor. Sadly, many of the "safer" "legal" alternatives such as androstendiol, etc. are not safe, effective, or cost-effective.

    Among those that admit to doing these boosters, the safest way to do it would be long-term administration, using 5-10 mgs of testosterone a day and 1 IU of GH before workout and 1 IU of GH after. (Yes, bodybuilders use much more; but, it seems so damaging that cycling causes problems). I've never done these things, so I wouldn't know.

    4. Training

    a. Movement prep- always do before workout, as it makes a big difference on strength and mobility

    Mark Verstegen's "Core Performance" seems to do an excellent job, a demonstration can be found here on RONJones [Dot] org

    b. Cardiovascular- one hour of cardio, 3x a week, preferably in the morning

    Running seems to be the best workout, as it is metabolically taxing and works on a lot of stabilizer muscles

    HIIT by Bill Philips or Tabata protocols are a good way to increase challenges of cardio workouts

    c. Weight training- 3x a week, for 60-90 minutes

    There are a myriad of routines; but, this is a great one for beginners (taken from bodybuilding [dot] com t = 4195843 )

    "A Simple beginner's Routine
    You will do 3 work outs per week on non consecutive days. The first work out is your heavy work out. The second work out is your medium work out, use 10% less weight for your work sets. The final work out for the week is your lite work out, use 20% less weight.

    Do a lite warm up with 1/4 of your work sets weight. Do a medium warm up with 1/2 of your work sets weight. Do 2 work sets with the same weight. Choose a starting weight and start light.

    These are the seven exercises you will be starting with.

    Squats
    Bench Presses
    Bent-Over Rows
    Overhead Barbell Presses
    Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
    Barbell Curls
    Calf Raises

    You will be running this program on a five week cycle as follows:
    The first week do all 4 sets for 8 reps.
    The second week do all 4 sets for 9 reps.
    The third week do all 4 sets for 10 reps.
    The fourth week do all 4 sets for 11 reps.
    The fifth week do all 4 sets for 12 reps.
    If you got all of the required reps on the fifth week then increase the weight by 10% and

    repeat the cycle. If you didn't get all of the reps on the fifth week then repeat the cycle with the same weight. You shouldn't need more than one minute rest between the warm up sets and you shouldn't need more than one minute thirty seconds between the work sets.
    Do some cardio and abs work on non weight training days."

    Alternatively, 10 sets of 30 pushups, sit-ups, and burpee circuit are able to be done in places where space is limited.

    5. Diet

    For weight loss, 12 calories per pound of bodyweight seems to be a good place to start.

    Once total calories are calculated, divide into 6 meals, in a 50% carbohydrate, 30% protein, 20% lipid ratio at each meal.

    (e.g. 2000 calories per day would be:
    1000 calories Carb, 600 calories protein, 400 calories lipid
    A regular meal would have 166 calories carb, 100 calories protein, 66 calories lipid
    A regular meal would have 42 grams carb, 25 g protein, 7 grams lipid

    For the first meal, which is a pre-workout meal, eat only half a meal ration of carbohydrates.
    For the final meal of the day, eat only half a meal ration of carbohydrates.
    For the post-workout meal, eat a double ration of carbohydrates (preferably starches, like potatoes, to refill glycogen optimally)

    Protein- too little protein causes deficiency and lack of satiety, too much causes over-satiety, bloating
    Carbohydrates- too little causes a hypoglycemic response, too much causes insulin problems over time
    Lipid- too little causes lack of hormonal release, too much causes weight problems

    6. Comments, questions?

    (this seems like a great program for people just starting out; after 4-12 weeks, and after getting below 10% bf for men and 17% bodyfat for women, they can think more about bulking up).

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    Honestly, the most important parts are creating a caloric deficit through diet, get enough protein, and use a strength training program that focuses on the big compound movements and methodically increases the weight being used (or perhaps climbing up a rep range before increasing weight).

    The exact macro percentages aren't that important as long as you're getting enough protein and your essential fats. Six meals is fine if you like it, but there's no benefit to it. The six meals/day idea is based on two broscience assumptions: "You can only absorb like 30g of protein per meal!" and "If you go 3 hours without food your metabolism will crash (or you'll catabolize your muscle)!" Both of those assumptions have been debunked by research. I had past weight loss efforts derailed by the foolish attempt to eat 5-6 times per day, which 1) Left me consistently unsatiated for the entire day, and 2) Was easy to give up on as soon as I had any kind of life/schedule change.

    I much prefer intermittent fasting (8 hour eating window, Leangains style), but for someone who doesn't want to do that, I would simply recommend focusing on the quantity of calories and protein, and prefer "clean" food to whatever extent you can do without burning out on it. Do whatever you want as far as number and timing of meals.
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    excess protein is not needed in terms of weightloss, now protecting muscle tissue is one thing but one could create a deficiency threw protein alone and still lose weight.
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    Excess protein isn't needed for anything--that's basically the definition of "excess". And yes, high protein isn't necessary for weight loss (nor is resistance training for that matter); I just assume that when people talk about "weight loss" (especially in a bodybuilding forum), what they're really talking about is fat loss with muscle maintenance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhone View Post
    Excess protein isn't needed for anything--that's basically the definition of "excess". And yes, high protein isn't necessary for weight loss (nor is resistance training for that matter); I just assume that when people talk about "weight loss" (especially in a bodybuilding forum), what they're really talking about is fat loss with muscle maintenance.
    i agree with you, i was simply stating the alternative...
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