Article: Low-Carb, High-Protein Diet Slows Cancer Growth In Mice, Study Finds

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    Article: Low-Carb, High-Protein Diet Slows Cancer Growth In Mice, Study Finds


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    I have heard claim that carbohydrate restriction reduces cancer risk from several sources but none of them have proposed a specific mechanism. I have induced central hypothyroidism in myself by carbohydrate restriction but consider the most probable mechanism to be mTOR and suspect that it might have negative effects for bodybuilders. Metformin (a common anti-diabetes drug) has been shown to reduce the frequency and growth rate of cancers. It apparently does this by repressing mTOR. See http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2010/...y=metforminOne of the mechanisms by which calorie restriction slows aging and reduces cancers is also by suppression of mTOR. CR increases proteolysis via the ubequitin-proteosome pathway. Unfortunately, this pattern of proteolysis affects all proteins to some degree, not just degraded proteins. See: http://www.google.com/search?q=mtor+...startPage=1The mTOR pathway appears to be a zero-sum game. Muscle growth and cancer risk increase/decrease together. This is true for GH and IGF-1 levels and mTOR is one of the proposed mechanisms.If one does not already have cancer, it might be better to increase proteolysis by mTOR-independent means. There are several existing drugs such as Verapamil which increase proteolysis independent of mTOR and others are in development.It also might be better to foster muscle growth by mTOR-independent means to avoid increasing both cancer and age-related effects. Mauro G. Di Pasquale has done some work on this.See: http://books.google.com/books?id=nbR...f=falseFinally, increased proteolysis does not always improve health. If a critical protein is produced in insufficient quantity or if its receptor is marginally insensitive to the protein then an increased degradation rate for the protein may kill the cell. This is implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases.See : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15337310

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