Sumo deadlift form check

  1. Sumo deadlift form check


    I know my form is garbage. It seems like it isn't when I lift, but I can tell by watching the video. So how can I fix this?
    https://youtu.be/vxZdy2j9zzI


  2. First off .. iron maiden. Yes!
    You are starting off all wrong. You need sit on your arse a bit more. Tighten your whole body, take slack off the bar, lift with your whole body and squueze those glutes at the top.
    It looks like your are lifting with your back
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  3. How does this look?
  4. Sumo deadlift form check


    Looking way better!
    Check this video out.
    https://youtu.be/d5eGGZXb0Is
    For some good info.
    Sumo is covered

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Shiznown View Post
    How does this look?
    Massive improvement in this one, doesn’t look like you are fully locking out though - at the top of the lift the glutes should be squeezed and forward with a full standing position.
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by Whisky View Post
    Massive improvement in this one, doesnít look like you are fully locking out though - at the top of the lift the glutes should be squeezed and forward with a full standing position.
    This. I think what would help you in that regard is trying to be conscious of keeping your core engaged. If youíre contracting your glutes and keeping your core tight and engaged (picture trying to theoretically bring your belly button and your glutes together), I think youíll naturally want to lock out at the top better. And remember to push through with your heels and not your toes, which will help you lock out too.

    On a side note, congrats to successfully being able to deadlift in your living room. Iíd be dropping that barbell when Iím fatigued and itíd go right through my floor.

  7. Second one looks better than the first. However, in both of them, you're still pulling conventional from a sumo stance. When you pull sumo, you're going to want to think about spreading the floor apart with your feet and forcing your hips to the bar while simultaneously pulling the bar backward with your lats, not standing up with it like you would conventional.

    Watch this, very thorough and has some good tips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQZ-RwYVLlc
    Less comprehensive but still decent: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ3A_HmfQyk
    Also, chair deadlifts will help with sumo form: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnEsI7uf4f0
    OLYMPUS LABS
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  8. Have to agree with the above post on all counts...great post @VO2Maxima ...honestly, I think everything about your form looks terrible...not trying to sound like an a.hole. just being as honest as I can...arm placement, grip width, hip positioning, torso positioning, bar path, lockout, elbows unlocked, etc...Sumo can be a very technical lift, and is almost always predetermined to be a successful lift based on starting position and initial break from the floor alone, unlike conv. where you can muscle it into place even when you misgroove. Keep working on it, just make sure you're focusing on form rather than overall weight, would hate to see you injure yourself.

    also, is there a reason why you're training sumo and not conventional?

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Yomo View Post
    ...Sumo can be a very technical lift, and is almost always predetermined to be a successful lift based on starting position and initial break from the floor alone, unlike conv. where you can muscle it into place even when you misgroove.

    ?
    This is exactly why I normally use sumo as a secondary lift on a squat day rather than as my main compound. Obviously sumo has more of a leg emphasis but I prefer a slightly lower weight so I can focus on maintaining better form whereas conventional is my heavy main compound. Less to go wrong in my opinion.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Yomo View Post
    Have to agree with the above post on all counts...great post @VO2Maxima ...honestly, I think everything about your form looks terrible...not trying to sound like an a.hole. just being as honest as I can...arm placement, grip width, hip positioning, torso positioning, bar path, lockout, elbows unlocked, etc...Sumo can be a very technical lift, and is almost always predetermined to be a successful lift based on starting position and initial break from the floor alone, unlike conv. where you can muscle it into place even when you misgroove. Keep working on it, just make sure you're focusing on form rather than overall weight, would hate to see you injure yourself.

    also, is there a reason why you're training sumo and not conventional?
    Si joint problems in the past. I heard sumo might be better for that. Maybe I'll switch to conventional.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Whisky View Post
    This is exactly why I normally use sumo as a secondary lift on a squat day rather than as my main compound. Obviously sumo has more of a leg emphasis but I prefer a slightly lower weight so I can focus on maintaining better form whereas conventional is my heavy main compound. Less to go wrong in my opinion.
    plenty of people are able to make solid, steady progress this way...always good to get at least somewhat comfortable practicing both.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Shiznown View Post
    Si joint problems in the past. I heard sumo might be better for that. Maybe I'll switch to conventional.
    just asking bro, no need to change up styles, especially if sumo helps prevent unnecessary wear and tear...most people can agree that sumo hits the lower back a little less, and if this allows you to train injury free, go for it...

    don't feel discouraged, most people don't have the guts to post a vid and ask for help...I'm more than willing to stop in and answer any questions I can...hopefully even more experienced and knowledgeable lifters can chime in as well.

  13. Quote Originally Posted by Yomo View Post
    just asking bro, no need to change up styles, especially if sumo helps prevent unnecessary wear and tear...most people can agree that sumo hits the lower back a little less, and if this allows you to train injury free, go for it...

    don't feel discouraged, most people don't have the guts to post a vid and ask for help...I'm more than willing to stop in and answer any questions I can...hopefully even more experienced and knowledgeable lifters can chime in as well.
    Thanks bud. I appreciate it and I appreciate the help. My goal is to reach the 405 mark in either variation. Considering I can do 325 with terrible form, I'm sure I can get there lol. Have some tail bone issues to, ironically not from lifting, but from sitting in crappy office chairs. I'm a hardcore PC gamer. Right now I have to struggle with the crappy chair I got for about another week until I can buy a a decent gaming chair.

  14. Quote Originally Posted by Shiznown View Post
    Thanks bud. I appreciate it and I appreciate the help. My goal is to reach the 405 mark in either variation. Considering I can do 325 with terrible form, I'm sure I can get there lol. Have some tail bone issues to, ironically not from lifting, but from sitting in crappy office chairs. I'm a hardcore PC gamer. Right now I have to struggle with the crappy chair I got for about another week until I can buy a a decent gaming chair.
    Worth really making sure you get them glutes firing before you lift mate. Banded pull through, kB swings, monster walks etc..... makes a massive difference both in performance and injury prevention.

    Agree with the point above in reply to my earlier comment, itís worth training both, I started conventional and didnít sumo much at all for years but definitely benefited from introducing it. Most people I know that lift big numbers will pull both styles (albeit in different rep ranges/weights)

  15. I'm stronger at sumo
    I'm 6foot 2 inches.
    But I take months of and just conventional .
    Hook grip sumo really shortens up the travel
    Silent mike
    Is a sumo expert blows Norton away in sumo.

  16. Sumo deadlifts do not hit the legs more - it shifts the load onto the external rotators of the hips
    If your goal is to simply get stronger then just concentrate on squats and regular deadlifts

    Do you have a training log? There are a lot of problems I'm seeing here and you're going to end up hurting yourself. All these things are fairly easy to fix and will require you to put more effort outside the gym than inside. If you have a log then I'll be able to provide guidance to you along the way. I've competed in powerlifting at the international level and coached many of my friends to better health and technique

  17. Oh I just saw the video.
    Like stated above, many flaws.
    You need to watch some videos

  18. Quote Originally Posted by AlexPowell View Post
    Sumo deadlifts do not hit the legs more - it shifts the load onto the external rotators of the hips
    If your goal is to simply get stronger then just concentrate on squats and regular deadlifts

    Do you have a training log? There are a lot of problems I'm seeing here and you're going to end up hurting yourself. All these things are fairly easy to fix and will require you to put more effort outside the gym than inside. If you have a log then I'll be able to provide guidance to you along the way. I've competed in powerlifting at the international level and coached many of my friends to better health and technique
    Okay, any advice is greatly appreciated. I don't really have a log. I do try and hit legs every 3-4 days and hit upper body every 3-4 days. I've played around with sets and reps and generally go 2-4 reps for two sets on front squats and deadlifts and 2 sets of 6-8 reps on upper body. I haven't done back squats in awhile because they bother my shoulders. I know I have tight shoulders and have started stretching, but only recently. I much prefer underhand bench, as long as I can prevent wrist pain. I always seem to flare out with overhand bench to the point where I'll never do it anymore.

  19. Quote Originally Posted by Shiznown View Post
    Okay, any advice is greatly appreciated. I don't really have a log. I do try and hit legs every 3-4 days and hit upper body every 3-4 days. I've played around with sets and reps and generally go 2-4 reps for two sets on front squats and deadlifts and 2 sets of 6-8 reps on upper body. I haven't done back squats in awhile because they bother my shoulders. I know I have tight shoulders and have started stretching, but only recently. I much prefer underhand bench, as long as I can prevent wrist pain. I always seem to flare out with overhand bench to the point where I'll never do it anymore.
    Create a log in the training log section, tag me in it and I'll start helping you
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