squat with hamstring injury?

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    squat with hamstring injury?


    is it ok to squat with a slight hamstring injury? i don't feel any discomfort when squatting but i can feel the pain when doing dynamic stretches for the hamstring

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    If it doesn't hurt, you're fine. Just listen to your body. Use a foam roller or something to mash it up before and after lifting. You'll be fine
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    I agree. If it isn't bad enough to stop you from having full ROM, then you are likely fine. If I stopped doing a movement every time I was in pain or had a slight injury, I'd never be working out. haha
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    If it hurts to stretch it, DON'T STRETCH IT! If you get a tiny hole in your favorite T-shirt, you don't start tuggin on that bad boy, you baby it.

    Try this:

    http://youtu.be/5AwMnHqrfuM

    These guys know about squatting around blown hammies. Young Joseph with the angry hammy has squatted 905 and Super D has squatted 1265.
    Training log:
    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/workout-logs/230377-13-weeks-rps.html
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    I have a hamstring injury and I squat. What irritates my hamstrings is if I single leg squat because the hams tend to be used more. Sometimes squatting below parallel will cause my hams to hurt. Deadlifts always irriatate them so I don't do them. If it doesn't hurt you to squat, go ahead and do it but just be aware of any pain that occurs afterward so you can tell if the squats are being injured further.
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    Use ART guys. Put tight compression around your injured area, when squatting or dead lifting. Don't go too intense, as the tissue may break apart rather than heal.

    For compression, use knee wraps, voodoo floss or whatever you want.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjetil1234 View Post
    Use ART guys. Put tight compression around your injured area, when squatting or dead lifting. Don't go too intense, as the tissue may break apart rather than heal.

    For compression, use knee wraps, voodoo floss or whatever you want.
    Personally for an acute injury id prefer different soft tissue mobilization techniques but to each his own, ART can be aggressive for an acute injury.

    OP squatting is fine, actually it can be good to restore lumbopelvic stabilization. I would take up an eccentric protocol using nordic curls and still legged DB deads personally, using light weight and working up, bodyweight obviously for nordic curls. Exercise selection also depends on area of insult, lying ham curls are more suitable for medial ham strains, the aforementioned is more suitable for lateral strains which are more common
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    You don't wanna squat with an acute injury. I was talking about the rehab part
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjetil1234 View Post
    You don't wanna squat with an acute injury. I was talking about the rehab part
    well u can, depending on the area of insult and mechanism of injury. EMG studies show little hamstring activity during the conventional back squat, it is actually a pretty poor choice for hamstring development, which is why OP probably doesn't have any pain. I agree with you if the injury is high near the ischial tub as this portion acts eccentrically to control the descent of the squat, if it is in the lower half then I dont see a problem with it acute or not. Its appears to be one of the first rehab choices for initiation of resistance training post hamstring injury.
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    squat with hamstring injury?


    Depends on the angle of the torso. Studies like that are silly imo, because there are so many variables.

    Squatting in an acute doesn't make any sense to me, but hey whatever floats your boat.
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    Idk sounds like a silly reason to dismiss quality information, individual differences in torso angle are not THAT significant, aside most variables in torso,hip and knee angles are well controlled in emg studies, its the person IRL u have to consider
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    If you really think that a low bar, low angle squat doesn't increase the hammy activation, then I don't know what to tell ya mate.
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    Idk what ur trying to say, the hammys will be synergists not prime movers despite any low bar, box, or sumo setup. Thanks matey

    Op its fine to squat /thread
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    So the Hams are not solely responsible for keeping the pelvis leveled in both ascent and descent mate?

    Failing hams=pelvis falling forward.

    Well I don't really want to argue with you man, doesn't matter to me. Later.
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    Um no, they aren't even active during the concentric part of a squat according to emg lolz
  

  
 

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