Heartburn Acid Reflux

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    Heartburn Acid Reflux


    I've been training intense for years and have never had problems with heartburn however over the last 6 months I've been getting a really annoying problem. Every time I weight lift I start burping loads (feeling of loads of pressure) and then after a while I will get a burning feeling in my throat when I burp. I've been docs was told it sounds like acid reflux but if I don't train I don't get it and I've been on meds for it and nothing. Can anyone give me any advice as I'm starting to miss meals and cutting my weight sessions short because of it. I don't eat 2 hours before workouts and I've tried OTC stuff and some tabs from the docs and nothing works I used to look forward to hitting the gym now I kinda dread it. Any advice would be much appreciated cheers

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    I feel ya with the belching i have the same problem i jus figure its from sucking so much air.. Dnt get heart burn though.. Try goin gouten free for a little bit. Wat supps are yu using pwo
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    Yer I figured it was from sucking in to much air it'salways with heavy lifts. I'm not taking any supps now was on protein and creatine but thort I'd stop them and see if it was them but it wasn't.
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    Have you tried digestive enzymes and apple cider vinegar?
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigToke View Post
    I've been training intense for years and have never had problems with heartburn however over the last 6 months I've been getting a really annoying problem. Every time I weight lift I start burping loads (feeling of loads of pressure) and then after a while I will get a burning feeling in my throat when I burp. I've been docs was told it sounds like acid reflux but if I don't train I don't get it and I've been on meds for it and nothing. Can anyone give me any advice as I'm starting to miss meals and cutting my weight sessions short because of it. I don't eat 2 hours before workouts and I've tried OTC stuff and some tabs from the docs and nothing works I used to look forward to hitting the gym now I kinda dread it. Any advice would be much appreciated cheers
    Here is what you may need mate, a great little formula of the AmishName:  images.jpg
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    Organic and Natural Acid Reflux Remedy – Old Amish Formula
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    Cheers for the info I'm gunna try digestive enzymes a few people have said give them ago and I'll try the apple cider vinegar sounds like it could help, I just don't understand why it just started happening never had it in the past but ill give these remedies a try.
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    Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, tested a newer approach to taming stubborn cases of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) -- one of the most common health conditions diagnosed in the United States.
    GERD arises when the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach fails to close properly, allowing stomach acids to splash up into the esophagus. The main symptom is chronic heartburn.
    For people who have frequent heartburn -- more than twice a week -- the go-to medications are the so-called proton pump inhibitors, such as Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium. But studies estimate that up to 40 percent of people on those drugs do not get enough relief.
    The new study included 100 such GERD patients. They all received an implant -- a bracelet-like device composed of magnetic beads -- that wraps around the portion of muscle where the esophagus joins the stomach. The point is to "augment" the muscle and prevent stomach acid reflux.
    After three years, researchers found, 64 percent of the patients had their acid reflux cut by at least half. And 87 percent had been able to stop taking their proton pump inhibitors altogether.
    "That's huge," lead researcher Dr. Robert Ganz said of the medication reduction.
    It's estimated that Americans spend $14 billion a year on prescription proton pump inhibitors. Because of the costs and potential side effects, many people would like to drop the drugs, said Ganz, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.
    He cited bone-thinning as one potential long-term side effect. "A lot of women do not want to be on proton pump inhibitors for that reason in particular," Ganz said.
    The device his team studied is already approved in the United States and marketed as the LINX Reflux Management System by Torax Medical, Inc., which also funded the study.
    Ganz said he could envision the device as an option for "some fraction" of the 20 million to 30 million Americans who take a daily medication for GERD symptoms.
    There are, of course, less extreme ways to manage your heartburn. Diet changes and weight loss often help, and if your heartburn is milder, over-the-counter antacids or drugs called H2 blockers -- brands like Zantac and Tagamet -- may be enough.
    Proton pump inhibitors, which block acid production, are often recommended for people with more frequent heartburn. If that doesn't work, surgery is typically seen as the last-ditch option.
    Traditionally, that has meant a 50-year-old procedure called Nissen fundoplication, where the upper part of the stomach is stitched around the lower end of the esophagus.
    Performed by an experienced surgeon, that procedure is very effective, said Dr. F. Paul Buckley III, director of general surgery at the Heartburn and Acid Reflux Center, Scott and White Clinic in Round Rock, Texas.
    The problem, though, is that the surgery creates a rigid ring around the esophagus, explained Buckley, who was not involved in the new study. That often leaves patients with difficulty swallowing or with other natural bodily functions -- including belching and vomiting.
    The LINX device, Buckley said, is designed to be "dynamic," expanding when food passes through, then quickly contracting again to prevent reflux.
    "I think this will have a significant effect on how we treat GERD," Buckley said.
    However, the device is not without problems: Two-thirds of the study patients had difficulty swallowing at first, although that dropped to 11 percent after one year, and 4 percent after three years.
    Six patients had more serious side effects, including four who had the device removed -- mostly for substantial problems with swallowing. Two other patients had the device removed for "disease management," the study noted.
    "The device seems to be a reasonable and fairly effective alternative," said Dr. Sigurbjorn Birgisson, a gastroenterologist and director of the Center for Swallowing and Esophageal Disorders at the Cleveland Clinic.
    It might be an option for people who do not find relief from medication -- or cannot stick with long-term drug treatment because of side effects or expense, according to Birgisson, who was not involved in the study.
    He added, though, that there should be further studies that compare the device with existing therapies, and look at the long-term effects.
    Ganz agreed. The long-term risks are one question. So far, Ganz said, none of the patients in this study has seen the device erode or "migrate" from its intended location. But they have only been followed for a few years.
    For his part, Buckley noted that there is a long history of failed therapies in the GERD world. One example is the Angelchik prosthesis, a doughnut-shaped silicone implant developed in the 1970s that wrapped around the junction between the esophagus and stomach. At first, it seemed to work well, but then doctors found high rates of longer-term complications; many people had lasting problems with swallowing, and in some cases the device eroded or slipped out of place.
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    I've had acid reflux for years, it's a trial and error thing really, and defiantly something you don't want to ignore. I have gird now because of it, and that means drinking s crap load of water while you eat to push the food down your best up throat. But enough complaining, the first thing you need to find out is if you have over or under active acid. The best way to find out is get some betaine hcl and take it with your meals (650mg) if you have under active acid you should have no problems, if you have over active acid you should get acid attacks constantly, so stop taking the hcl.

    If your over active which I am, basically you playing a constant extinguish game. Keep acidic foods to a minimum, coffee, hot sauce, etc. don't gorge yourself you just end up filling you stomach up to much and acid overflows easier. Try going gluten free, I discovered this the last month or so ago, and it has really lowered my attacks. Sleep on your back with your chest and head elevated above your stomach, just because you aren't having attacks at night doesn't mean it's not going to start, prevent!! Don't react. Lastly just to warn you it's gonna get worse, I'm sorry to tell you that but it is, so you want to nip this in the bud fast. I've had times where it brings me to my knees.

    Things that help stop attacks.

    Apples whole, they both help to neutralize acid and scrub it off the walls of your esophagus. Apple cider vin doesn't work for over active acid, at least it didn't for me.

    Water, always carry around a bottle of water. People say it doesn't work well it does for me especially at the gym when I have an attack.

    Digestive enzymes(without hcl !) these kind of help.

    I'm trying out tums pre workout right now, see how it works.


    If you have under active acid, I don't have much experience about that. I do know a lot of people have success with hcl, and people swear by apple cider vinegar. You should still sleep elevated though and don't over eat.

    Basically what I've found with getting heartburn at the gym it's mostly on exercises I push on my abdominal region with, like I got it today doing dead lifts or I will get it doing supported t-bar rows. So basically if you know your gonna do exercises that are going to push on your core a lot bring some water.

    Here's a sample meal that works pretty well pre workout and I rarely get heartburn with it. I eat about 1 hour pre workout.

    1/2 cup bobs red mill grits (made with water, little butter, cheddar)

    Half cup chopped sautéed spinach or other greens like kale

    6 whole eggs, or chicken

    Little hot sauce ( tiny bit doesn't hurt )
    Bigcountry's Getting a little smaller: Epi/Stano Log

    http://anabolicminds.com/forum/cycle-info/231194-bigcountrys-getting-little.html
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    Thanks Bigcountry sounds like some sound information for me to go try out I did a trial of 2weeks off the gym and I didn't get it once but stopping gym is not a option for me, I've stopped smokeing as Ino that isn't good for it as for hot sauce I'm not sure i can stop that so easily lol. Bin useing digestive enzymes with betaine HCL I can't really see any difference maybe a slightly bit better but unsure. I drink loads of water already I always have especially wen training so I'm guessing its all down to diet and finding a food that reduces it for me. Should I stop takeing these multi-digestive enzyme with HCL then?
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