can i replace squats with another exercise

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  1. Exclamation can i replace squats with another exercise


    im getting alot of lower back pain recently from squats can substitute them with any other exercises for a month or 2 any suggestions


  2. leg press (plate loaded). also called the SLED.

    http://video.search.yahoo.com/video/...=0001860715689
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  3. thanks suncloud i appriciate the help only prob i only have a bench and workout from home anything i can do there i tried the zercher ? squat and was still sore

  4. i get back pain when my form breaks down. i'd suggest troubleshooting your form before giving up on THE MAIN massbuilding movement. post a vid here.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by urbanski View Post
    i get back pain when my form breaks down. i'd suggest troubleshooting your form before giving up on THE MAIN massbuilding movement. post a vid here.
    will try thanks maybe it is my form i thought it might be my hight but deadlifts are fine
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  6. i agree with urbanski. its more likely than not form. if you could post a vid that would help. without that, and working out of your home, there's very little i could suggest besides walking lunges (with barbells).

  7. 99% of squat issues are due to poor form.
    M.Ed. Ex Phys


  8. Quote Originally Posted by suncloud View Post
    i agree with urbanski. its more likely than not form. if you could post a vid that would help. without that, and working out of your home, there's very little i could suggest besides walking lunges (with barbells).
    thanks i will try and correct my form and post a vid

  9. yes, Dumbell lunges, and leg press, hack squats, leg ext. these are in my rotation

  10. Change it up to front squats. Reduces the ability to cheat with your back so much.
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222

  11. Quote Originally Posted by CopyCat View Post
    Change it up to front squats. Reduces the ability to cheat with your back so much.
    how do front squats work is that not like the zercher squat? thanks for the help ill try anything always up to try new exercises

  12. Quote Originally Posted by mr mass View Post
    how do front squats work is that not like the zercher squat? thanks for the help ill try anything always up to try new exercises
    Not the same as zercher. Here is a vid, you can find many more just by typing in front squat to youtube. For arm placement some people hold them like in this video, others cross their arms almost like they are doing the universal sign for choking except their hands are not actually on their throat, but past it more towards the shoulders. You'll see it in the vids if you look them up.

    YouTube- Front Squats are used for CrossFit as an exercise to improve posture and power during training
    ADVANCED MUSCLE SCIENCE
    Strongest On The Market
    RECOVERBRO: Est. Post #3222

  13. Front squats kick ass. I prefer them over back squats currently.

    And your height has nothing to do with squats making your back hurt - bad form and a weak core does though.
    Bulk Performance Solutions
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  14. There are no replacements for squats. I would go to a Doctor and have my lower back checked out and then perhaps take some time off. It seems like it'd be more of a form problem.

    Leg presses are hard on the spine. While you're recuperating you could include lunges for the quads and glute/ham raises for the hamstrings and glutes.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  15. Quote Originally Posted by CopyCat View Post
    Change it up to front squats. Reduces the ability to cheat with your back so much.
    And it also takes out a lot of the core involvement and posterior chain utilization.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  16. Along with the front squat, look into one leg squat variations such as the bulgarian split squat(otherwise known as a rear foot elevated split squat). It is easier on the back, and you can still get some decent loading.

    Edit: I have to add that it is almost certainly poor form that is causing the pain, and that it is best to figure that out and correct it. Back squats are basically the best movement you can do(concerning size and overall strength), with the exception of maybe deadlifts.

  17. Quote Originally Posted by rckvl7 View Post
    with the exception of maybe deadlifts.
    Ya know. I've always wanted to compare the two in a study to see which one would produce the most mass. The obvious solution of course is do both, but deadlifts work more muscles and allow you to lift heavier weight and squats have a longer ROM and keep the entire kinetic chain under isometric tension from the minute the bar is unracked until it is then racked again.

    Does anyone have any studies or supportive articles comparing the two?
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  18. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    And it also takes out a lot of the core involvement and posterior chain utilization.
    Not at all. Just take a wider stance and make sure your ROM is good, and you'll hit your hammies and glutes no prob.

    As for core, Front have always proved far more difficult on that area than back squats for me. Most guys can front squat way less than than their back squat largely because the core activation is so much greater. Also because the form is so much more demanding.
    Bulk Performance Solutions
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  19. wow thanks for all the help great to get some advice from people who know what there doing i will go to the doc and hopefully sort my lower back out so i can get squating again

  20. Quote Originally Posted by Resolve View Post
    Not at all. Just take a wider stance and make sure your ROM is good, and you'll hit your hammies and glutes no prob.

    As for core, Front have always proved far more difficult on that area than back squats for me. Most guys can front squat way less than than their back squat largely because the core activation is so much greater. Also because the form is so much more demanding.
    Sorry, but there is no way a front squat is harder on a core than the back squat. During the back squat the resistance is placed over the back, which causes the torso to move forward and keep parallel alignment with the feet and bar. This causes isometric contraction to the core that the body in front and back are under tension. And front squats do not hit the posterior chain nowhere near as hard as back squats.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  21. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Sorry, but there is no way a front squat is harder on a core than the back squat. During the back squat the resistance is placed over the back, which causes the torso to move forward and keep parallel alignment with the feet and bar. This causes isometric contraction to the core that the body in front and back are under tension. And front squats do not hit the posterior chain nowhere near as hard as back squats.
    It most definitely IS harder on the core. The front bar loading will PULL you forward. Your core will work hard to keep your torso upright. It does not sound like you have any OL style training under your belt at all. If Mark Rippetoe said the same thing, would you believe him? Because he did too.

  22. I had always heard that Front squats were harder on the core, but to be honest I don't really know. I do know that Front squats don't hit the posterior chain as well as a back squat.

  23. Quote Originally Posted by TheLastRonin View Post
    It most definitely IS harder on the core. The front bar loading will PULL you forward. Your core will work hard to keep your torso upright. It does not sound like you have any OL style training under your belt at all. If Mark Rippetoe said the same thing, would you believe him? Because he did too.
    You have more weight over your body doing back squats, which causes the core to work harder. And yes, please provide me a link with Rippetoe saying front squats are harder on the core.

    And there's no way front squats work the posterior chain to any reasonable degree. Your posterior chain is worked because you are breaking parallel and using hip extension. You cannot use hip extension during a front squat and you cannot drive weight up using your hips.

    Front squats are quad dominant.

    Rippetoe goes into some detail on the subject on pages 223-230 of the 2nd Edition of starting strength.

    Key points:

    -Hamstrings are already shortened & the positioning of the bar makes it impossible to use hip drive as a cue.
    -The body is kept as vertical as possible, in comparison to the back squat where some amount of forward lean is desired
    -More core stabilization is needed because of the bar positioning
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  24. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Sorry, but there is no way a front squat is harder on a core than the back squat. During the back squat the resistance is placed over the back, which causes the torso to move forward and keep parallel alignment with the feet and bar. This causes isometric contraction to the core that the body in front and back are under tension. And front squats do not hit the posterior chain nowhere near as hard as back squats.
    Yup, the torso moves forward, which can countered by spinal erector activation. With front squats, load is placed directly over your abs - lower back has to remain arched and those abs have to flex like hell to keep from caving.

    Shoot man, you can literally do front squat partials as an ab exercise - rack the bar across your shoulders, extend your arms up and away from you and do about a 1/2 squat. Hold for time.

    I grant that back squats do activate the posterior chain better, and for that very reason I incorporate them as an accessory movement; but I have seen better quad, calf and ab development in the few months I've focused on the front squat than in the years I've spent focused on the back squat.
    Bulk Performance Solutions
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  25. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    You have more weight over your body doing back squats, which causes the core to work harder. And yes, please provide me a link with Rippetoe saying front squats are harder on the core.

    And there's no way front squats work the posterior chain to any reasonable degree. Your posterior chain is worked because you are breaking parallel and using hip extension. You cannot use hip extension during a front squat and you cannot drive weight up using your hips.

    Front squats are quad dominant.
    No, you can move more weight because it takes less effort per pound of load.
    Bulk Performance Solutions
    --No Proprietary Blends, All Performance--

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  26. Quote Originally Posted by Resolve View Post
    No, you can move more weight because it takes less effort per pound of load.
    No. You move more weight because the posterior chain is utilized much more and your hips are stronger than your knees.

    Front squats place emphasis on the quads and quads don't squat big weights - the posterior chain does.

    Read Dave Tate's 900 lb squat article. I can't link it to you.

    And if you read my post above in starting strength Mark Rippetoe goes into major detail on how the core works harder during back squats. All you're talking is taking much of the core and posterior chain (both are important) out of the situation.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  27. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    No. You move more weight because the posterior chain is utilized much more and your hips are stronger than your knees.

    Front squats place emphasis on the quads and quads don't squat big weights - the posterior chain does.

    Read Dave Tate's 900 lb squat article. I can't link it to you.

    And if you read my post above in starting strength Mark Rippetoe goes into major detail on how the core works harder during back squats. All you're talking is taking much of the core and posterior chain (both are important) out of the situation.
    Exactly - more posterior chain activation (which I've already told you you were right about) occurs, spreading the load over a larger number of motor units.

    That is exactly why you can back squat more, but that doesn't mean the core individually is working harder.

    Will your core gain strength from back squatting? Absolutely. But take a guy with a 400+ back squat who's never front squatted and have him front squat 135 (or less if need be) for 5x5. His abs will feel it.
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  28. Quote Originally Posted by Resolve View Post
    Exactly - more posterior chain activation (which I've already told you you were right about) occurs, spreading the load over a larger number of motor units.

    That is exactly why you can back squat more, but that doesn't mean the core individually is working harder.

    Will your core gain strength from back squatting? Absolutely. But take a guy with a 400+ back squat who's never front squatted and have him front squat 135 (or less if need be) for 5x5. His abs will feel it.
    Likewise. Take a guy that is used to front squatting 135 and put 405 lbs on his back and see if he can withstand the same time under tension with that resistance as the guy back squatting.

    The core muscles are not just the abs; they are also the lower back muscles which contract significantly harder with back squats than front squats.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS

  29. Quote Originally Posted by kingk0ng View Post
    Likewise. Take a guy that is used to front squatting 135 and put 405 lbs on his back and see if he can withstand the same time under tension with that resistance as the guy back squatting.

    The core muscles are not just the abs; they are also the lower back muscles which contract significantly harder with back squats than front squats.
    LOL?! Are you serious?! If a guy can only front squat 135, how in the hell do you expect him to lift 405 for anything?! That's ridiculous!

    You don't think a guy who can back squat 400 but only front squat 135 has a muscle imbalance that needs to be redressed? I do! And that imbalance would be where? In the core! Because you have to stabilize that whole front half of your core (as you state, the core is both up front and in back), which you are unaccustomed to using so much, in order to keep your torso as upright as possible.

    And yes, the "back" of the core is worked harder on "back" squats, but the "front" of the core is worked harder on "front squats." And both are equally important.
    Bulk Performance Solutions
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  30. Quote Originally Posted by Resolve View Post
    LOL?! Are you serious?! If a guy can only front squat 135, how in the hell do you expect him to lift 405 for anything?! That's ridiculous!

    You don't think a guy who can back squat 400 but only front squat 135 has a muscle imbalance that needs to be redressed? I do! And that imbalance would be where? In the core! Because you have to stabilize that whole front half of your core (as you state, the core is both up front and in back), which you are unaccustomed to using so much, in order to keep your torso as upright as possible.

    And yes, the "back" of the core is worked harder on "back" squats, but the "front" of the core is worked harder on "front squats." And both are equally important.
    You misread my post.

    I said see how long he can keep under the bar; how long his core could support it. A guy that back squats 405 can easily stay under the bar of a front squat (isometrically) longer than a guy that front squats 135 can stay under the bar with a 405 lb back squat. And as far as core imbalance goes, I used an example contrary to yours.

    You are looking at pound for pound measurements of strength. Of course a 405 lb front squat will require more stabilize maturity than a 405 lb back squat, but if the weights used is in proper alignment the back squat will demand more stabilize use (from the core) because your body works harder to stabilize heavier loads.

    And the torso is upright during high bar squats, as they are with front squats which would contract the the front of the core much harder. According to the all or none principle all fibers from the front of the core must contract with a back squat. Your body will work harder to support heavier weight over your center of gravity - with back squats.

    Anyway, front squats are not a suitable replacement for back squats for a few reasons. Namely, the overactive hip flexors and understimulated hip extensors can cause lordosis.
    Former Marine, UT-BSN, NSCA-CPT, NASM-CPT, CSCS
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