Which of these supps is causing HORRENDOUS gas?

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  1. Which of these supps is causing HORRENDOUS gas?


    Just started taking Melting Point, Sesaglow, cAmphibolic, Restore, and also Potassium. The flatulence is out of control here...


  2. What's you protein intake like?

    Also, I'm taking a probiotic from dsade and it's really helping my gas problems. I'm going to post a review after I've been using it for a while, but in the first week it has helped a ton.
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  3. I bet money its your whey.

  4. I bet all my money you are using whey CONCENTRATE instead of isolate.

  5. incease in protein intake i know when i first starting to jack up my protein i got real bad gas
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  6. at least people will stay clear of you

  7. hahaha this is hilarious.

    it could be any of them, unless youve taken all of them separately at one point in time.

    but id also put my money on the whey.

  8. Like everyone has already mentioned, it's probably your whey protein or your increased protein intake.

    I know when I eat a large amount of eggwhites throughout the day it also gives me pretty bad gas. How many eggs are you consuming throughout the day?

  9. Protein intake hasn't really changed much...it stays between 275-300g. My whey is Cytosport Complete Whey; other protein sources are chicken, lean steak, some fish. My diet has pretty much been the same for about 6 weeks now, but the gas has really stepped it up a notch since I added in the new supps. I mean, I fart like every 5-10 minutes, no exaggeration, and it's enough to clear the room.

  10. camphibolic = forskholin

    That's my bet.

  11. I have more experience with this than I wish I had. Digestive upset need not be a result of a change in your diet. It could also be a result of your body slowly becoming intolerant to a food or supplement.

    One candidate is magnesium. I can't take the stuff orally. It is marketed as "milk of magnesia" for laxative purposes. It's just as laxative in supplements, though the doses may be lower.

    More likely, perhaps, your body isn't so fond of whey supplements. I have pretty bad intolerance of milk products, though a little half and half in my tea doesn't seem to hurt. But I stay away from whey powders because they wreck me. On the other hand, I love eggs and they love me. Go figure.

    As far as protein supplements go, the Vitamin Shoppe (sorry to name my source, please don't ban me!) sells a fantastic supplement called Amino Complex 1500mg. I take 15 of the pills once or twice a day. Take them with something sweet or they won't go down.

    You should also consider digestive aids such as enzymes, activated charcoal, and especially probiotics. Garden of Life's Primal Defense is perhaps the best probiotic on the market.

    I think the worst idea is for you to laugh this off. Digestive disorders can mess up your life in a big way. If you can't fix this in two weeks, see a doctor. Mention it to your doctor regardless the next time you have an appointment.

    Good luck!

  12. I say it's your whey. I know when I switch I crop dust for at least a week. Also Stay away from open flames.

  13. That's the thing, I didn't switch. I've been using Cytosport for almost a year now.

    Guess I'll just pick up some Gas-X or something

  14. Why are you supplementing your potassium??

    Quote Originally Posted by Quil
    Just started taking Melting Point, Sesaglow, cAmphibolic, Restore, and also Potassium. The flatulence is out of control here...

  15. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    Why are you supplementing your potassium??
    Because he's on MP?

    And why *NOT* supplement potassium?

  16. Do you know the dangers associated with hyperkalemia?

    Do you know how much potassium we already get in our diet? In whey supplements?

    Hyperkalemia can be FATAL.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt76
    Because he's on MP?

    And why *NOT* supplement potassium?

  17. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    Do you know the dangers associated with hyperkalemia?

    Do you know how much potassium we already get in our diet? In whey supplements?

    Hyperkalemia can be FATAL.
    ROFL LMAO Dude, relax.

    Do you have ANY idea how much potassium is needed to get into hyperkalemia? Do you have any idea how much potassium is needed for FATAL hyperkalemia? Do you have any idea how medium hyperkalemia FEELS?

    Bottom line, anyone who endangers his life with potassium is TRYING TO DO IT.

  18. mental note.. avoid standing behind Quil at the gym ....


  19. Quote Originally Posted by Squeaks4ver
    mental note.. avoid standing behind Quil at the gym ....

    Yeah, my lifting partner HATES me right now. As does my wife...can you say "Dutch Oven"? LOL.

    I am supplementing with Potassium because of the MP, at the advice of Dr D and others on this board. So far I'm at 900mg/day, well within the safe-zone of potassium supplementation. Good lookin out though.

  20. I guess I came off a bit harsh LOL Not my intention bro!

    In all seriousness it is actually pretty easy to cause hyperkalmeia - especially given the supps he is already taking. With an elevated BUN/Cr which is commonly seen in body builders as well as elevated cpk from the continuous muscle tissue breakdown it is pretty easy. 40-80 meq additonal potassium every day in this setting can lead to hyperkalemia quite eaily.

    I don't recommend extra potassium beyond that which one can obtain from one's diet and whey.

    No one can feel mild or even moderate hyperkalemia, very few ever even feel severe hyperkalemia, that is why it is to be taken seriously!

    Cheers!

    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt76
    ROFL LMAO Dude, relax.

    Do you have ANY idea how much potassium is needed to get into hyperkalemia? Do you have any idea how much potassium is needed for FATAL hyperkalemia? Do you have any idea how medium hyperkalemia FEELS?

    Bottom line, anyone who endangers his life with potassium is TRYING TO DO IT.

  21. Quote Originally Posted by Grunt76
    Bottom line, anyone who endangers his life with potassium is TRYING TO DO IT.
    <_< >_> <_<

  22. LOLers!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ziricote
    <_< >_> <_<

  23. The only supplement that caused me that kind of issues was (is) creatine. But it's not too bad, not a weapon of mass disgusting or anything like that.

  24. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    I guess I came off a bit harsh LOL Not my intention bro!

    In all seriousness it is actually pretty easy to cause hyperkalmeia - especially given the supps he is already taking. With an elevated BUN/Cr which is commonly seen in body builders as well as elevated cpk from the continuous muscle tissue breakdown it is pretty easy. 40-80 meq additonal potassium every day in this setting can lead to hyperkalemia quite eaily.

    I don't recommend extra potassium beyond that which one can obtain from one's diet and whey.

    No one can feel mild or even moderate hyperkalemia, very few ever even feel severe hyperkalemia, that is why it is to be taken seriously!

    Cheers!
    Really?

    You mean people don't realize when their heart begins beating slow and irregular and their blood pressure in the 80/30 ranges? I think they do. You feel weak, dizzy, feeble, unenergetic, there is something OBVIOUSLY WRONG when that happens. Maybe you don't feel hyperkalemia in a hospital bed, but for an athlete it is extremely different.

    The lowest possible dose that has been recorded as enough to be lethal to a human was 14 grams given all at once. This was in a small, weak person totally unaccustomed to potassium. One dose of 14 grams. That is about one heaping tablespoon of potassium chloride. About 25 size 0 capsules filled. And we're talking about an extreme sensitivity here.

    So I don't think any 200lb+ athlete in good health is going to hurt himself by adding a couple grams. Really.

  25. Lethal hyperkalemia can be completely asymptomatic. HYPOtension as you mention is almost never a symptom. Palpitations are nonspecific and athletes almost always expereince them and are usually completely benign. To think that one will always be symptomatic with hyperkalemia is false, and to think not feeling the hyperkalemia means one is ok is also completely false. I have witnessed theses not only in the hospital but outside in healthy and competitive athletes as a physician. Th

    It does not simply take several grams given at once to cause the lethality. Chronic supplementation can lead to an even more insidious presentation of hyperkalemia and lethal outcomes may be just as common.

    And independed of adding a few grams, it is the molar equivalents that are of interest. The range for normal potassium is 3.5-5.0. Theoretically 10 meQ will bump the potassium 0.1. Now - do we know how many meQ are in these KCl supps? Do you know how many meQ of Kcl ar ein those grams he is taking? Did oyu sit out and do the calculation?

    It is usually only provided in grams. So something that can be completely benign in low doses can be potentially lethal in the athletic as well as hospital bed setting.

    Either way, one needs to be completely wary of potassium supplementation. It is easy to induce hyperkalemia and its implications are lethal. it is not to be belittled by any means, I don't care how healthy an indivudal thinks he or she is.

    It is foolish to supplement blindly. Healthy individuals on a good diet RARELY need supplementation with KCl. Frankly it is a waste of money.

    THink about it, tiny doses of KCl are given IV in lethal injection....

    Cheers.
    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt76
    Really?

    You mean people don't realize when their heart begins beating slow and irregular and their blood pressure in the 80/30 ranges? I think they do. You feel weak, dizzy, feeble, unenergetic, there is something OBVIOUSLY WRONG when that happens. Maybe you don't feel hyperkalemia in a hospital bed, but for an athlete it is extremely different.

    The lowest possible dose that has been recorded as enough to be lethal to a human was 14 grams given all at once. This was in a small, weak person totally unaccustomed to potassium. One dose of 14 grams. That is about one heaping tablespoon of potassium chloride. About 25 size 0 capsules filled. And we're talking about an extreme sensitivity here.

    So I don't think any 200lb+ athlete in good health is going to hurt himself by adding a couple grams. Really.

  26. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    THink about it, tiny doses of KCl are given IV in lethal injection....

    Cheers.
    You mean in that scary-looking 30cc syringe? Yes I bet they are doing that just to make the patient feel better.

  27. Quote Originally Posted by Quil
    Just started taking Melting Point, Sesaglow, cAmphibolic, Restore, and also Potassium. The flatulence is out of control here...
    Back to your real problem...

    Its the camphibolic. This exact same thing happen to my best friend when he tried it. Stop and it will clear up in 3 days, or it did for him atleast. I got a free bottle of camph out of it.

  28. Quote Originally Posted by Grunt76
    Really?

    You mean people don't realize when their heart begins beating slow and irregular and their blood pressure in the 80/30 ranges? I think they do. You feel weak, dizzy, feeble, unenergetic, there is something OBVIOUSLY WRONG when that happens. Maybe you don't feel hyperkalemia in a hospital bed, but for an athlete it is extremely different.

    The lowest possible dose that has been recorded as enough to be lethal to a human was 14 grams given all at once. This was in a small, weak person totally unaccustomed to potassium. One dose of 14 grams. That is about one heaping tablespoon of potassium chloride. About 25 size 0 capsules filled. And we're talking about an extreme sensitivity here.

    So I don't think any 200lb+ athlete in good health is going to hurt himself by adding a couple grams. Really.

    You turned me on to the Potassium Chloride for blood pressure. It works. "No Salt", people. As far as that dead rodent living in your ass, get some digestive enzymes. You'll also be packing in more food because of them. More food=more calories=:bb:

  29. Quote Originally Posted by DeerDeer
    THink about it, tiny doses of KCl are given IV in lethal injection....

    Cheers.
    Lethal dose: 100 mEq K = 7.45g KCl As an IV injection.

    So I think someone adding 1-2 g per day will be allright, given that it is so extremely easily excreted among healthy humans.

    Here is some hard science on the evil of potassium.

    Potassium excretion in healthy Japanese women was increased by a dietary intervention utilizing home-parcel delivery of Okinawan vegetables.

    * Tuekpe MK,
    * Todoriki H,
    * Sasaki S,
    * Zheng KC,
    * Ariizumi M.

    Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, Japan.

    Potassium, which is abundant in vegetables, is inversely related to blood pressure. Although the situation has changed somewhat in recent years, the Okinawan diet has generally included a large amount of vegetables, and until recently Okinawans had the lowest rates of mortality due to stroke and coronary heart disease in Japan. Based on the hypothesis that these low mortality rates are partly attributable to increased potassium intake resulting from the high vegetable consumption, this study examined whether increasing the consumption of typical yellow-green Okinawan vegetables increases potassium intake. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether increased consumption of these vegetables should be one of the dietary modifications recommended in public health promotion programs for Okinawans. The study employed 56 healthy, normotensive, free-living Japanese women aged 18-38 years living in Okinawa. They were randomized to a dietary intervention group (n=27) or a control group (n=29). Members of the dietary intervention group received an average weight of 371.4 g/day of a combination of the following vegetables twice weekly through an express home parcel deliver service for a period of 14 days: Goya (Momordica charantia), green papaya (Carica papaya), Handama (Gynura bicolor), Karashina (Brassica juncea), Njana (Crepidiastrum lanceolatium), Fuchiba (Artemisia vulgaris) and Fudanso (Beta vulgaris); and they consumed an average of 144.9 g/day, resulting in a 20.5% increase in their urinary potassium excretion over the baseline (p=0.045). The members of the control group were asked to avoid these vegetables, and the change in potassium excretion in this group was not significant (p=0.595). Urinary sodium and magnesium excretions, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, folic acid, triglycerides and serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterols changed non-significantly in both groups. Also, post-intervention urinary potassium excretion correlated positively with vegetable consumption in both the dietary intervention (p<0.0001) and control (p=0.008) groups and with Okinawan vegetable intake in the dietary intervention group (p=0.0004).

    PMID: 16940700 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    Potassium chloride supplementation diminishes platelet reactivity in humans.

    * Kimura M,
    * Lu X,
    * Skurnick J,
    * Awad G,
    * Bogden J,
    * Kemp F,
    * Aviv A.

    Hypertension Research Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark 07103, USA.

    The prevalence of occlusive stroke is inversely correlated with potassium intake. We explored the hypothesis that a high potassium intake attenuates platelet reactivity, as expressed in ADP-evoked platelet aggregation. We studied healthy men (n=31) and women (n=42), blacks (n=33) and whites (n=40). In this cohort, we supplemented the habitual intake of 17 men and 21 women with 60 mmol KCl/70 kg body weight per day for 3 days and maintained 14 men and 21 women on their habitual intake. We then compared the change in ADP concentration causing 50% of the maximal initial rate (EC50) of platelet aggregation in the potassium-supplemented versus control groups. Potassium supplementation attenuated platelet reactivity, expressed by an increase in EC50 of platelet aggregation (P=0.0005), which was primarily attributable to an increase in EC50 in whites (P=0.0004). Urinary potassium excretion was significantly lower in blacks than in whites under basal conditions and after potassium supplementation. We conclude that potassium supplementation diminishes platelet reactivity, a phenomenon that provides a link between platelet biology and occlusive stroke.

    PMID: 15505115 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Effects of potassium citrate supplementation on bone metabolism.

    * Marangella M,
    * Di Stefano M,
    * Casalis S,
    * Berutti S,
    * D'Amelio P,
    * Isaia GC.

    Nefrologia Dialisi e Centro Calcolosi Renale, Torino, Italy.

    Western diets rich in animal protein result in long-term acid loading that, despite corresponding increases in net renal acid excretion, may induce a chronic state of acidemia. This may have deleterious effects on both the kidney and bone, by increasing the risk of calcium stone in the former and leading to chemical dissolution of mineral alkaline salts in the latter. Whereas supplementation with alkaline citrate has been shown to reduce stone recurrences, its effect on bone turnover has received less attention. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether potassium citrate favorably affects bone turnover markers in postmenopausal females with low bone density. Thirty women, aged 58 +/- 8.1 years, were enrolled and studied on basal conditions and after a 3-month course of potassium citrate supplementation (0.08-0.1 g/kg b.w. daily). Twenty-two women concluded the study while 8 withdrew. Twenty-four age-matched healthy women were taken as control cases. All were evaluated for electrolyte and acid-base balance-related parameters, bone turnover, markers and renal function. A significant decrease in net acid excretion was observed upon citrate supplementation, and this was paralleled by a significant decrease of urinary deoxypyridinolines, hydroxyproline-to-creatinine ratios, and, to a lesser extent, serum osteocalcin. Percent variations of urine citrate were inversely related to those of deoxypyridinolines and hydroxyproline. No change in these chemistries occurred in the control group. Our results suggest that treatment with an alkaline salt, such as potassium citrate, can reduce bone resorption thereby contrasting the potential adverse effects caused by chronic acidemia of protein-rich diets.

    PMID: 15255069 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  30. Quote Originally Posted by Grunt76
    Lethal dose: 100 mEq K = 7.45g KCl As an IV injection.

    So I think someone adding 1-2 g per day will be allright, given that it is so extremely easily excreted among healthy humans.

    Here is some hard science on the evil of potassium.
    Those 100meQ are given in a bolus. We normally replete 10mEq IV each over 1 hour to prevent some of the burning associated with IV dosing.

    I actually took the time and logged into my old med school's E-library account and pulled all three articles.

    The first study offers no information regarding the quantity of potassium ingested - onyl rough estimates. During the discussion they attribute some of the positive finding to the substituion of potassium in the diet for one lower in sodium. So the argument is made whether it is the increased postassium or the decreased sodium intake that lead to the decrease in blood pressure - or was it the addition of these vegetables to the diet. it's from a crappy journal either way (Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension).

    The role of potassium in occlusive stroke was evaluated but deemed as only a small part of the bigger picture. This study by in the journal Hypertension by the American Heart Association has been cited many times in orther articles simply because it found one distant though linkable association. Most remarkable is since it has been shown that it is not the increase in potassium intake that is positive but rather the decrease in sodium in take, the subsequent decrease in hypertension, prevention of hypercoaguable states that lead to the decrease in prevalence on occulsive stroke (notably in white populations). Platelet aggregation plays 1/3 of the role. Search "Virchow's triad".

    The next study in a relatively crappy journal (Calcified tissue international) in 1979 deals with potassium citrate. It is mainly used to acidify the urine and prevent stones - most consider it a mild diuretic. It's an almost completely other animal with properties that cannot be directly compared to KCl by any means. (C6H5K3O7 + H2O vs KCl).

    THe bottom line, KCl supplementation is completely unnecessary in a healthy, balanced diet as MOST athletes, bodybuilders subject themselves too.

    It is entirely a waste of money to purposely purchase a supplement made of KCl, we already get it in so many ways.

    However, if it means that you are decreasing your sodium intake and replacing it with potassium, there may be some positive benefits, mostly because of the decrease in sodium intake, not because of the increase in potassium intake.

    Excellent discourse.

    Cheers.
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