CoQ10

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    Age and statin use which describes half the US population at this point.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamski View Post
    Enzymes that can act as antioxidants. I'm talking about the only lipid soluble antioxidant.
    ALA is not an enzyme and it is lipid soluble (its amphipathic, actually).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Admin View Post
    Age and statin use which describes half the US population at this point.
    But not half the AM population
    http://pescience.com/
    http://selectprotein.com/
    The above is my own opinion and does not reflect the opinion of PES
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr.cooper69 View Post
    But not half the AM population

    You would be surprised



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    A Supplement Everyone Over 30 Should be Taking

    As our bodies age, CoQ10 production is significantly reduced



    CoEnzyme Q10, also known as CoQ10, is a lipid-soluble compound that is needed for energy throughout the entire body. But your body’s natural production declines with age and a deficiency of this nutrient could cause a myriad of health complications.
    Found in the body’s “cellular power plants” known as mitochondria, the presence of CoQ10 is required for the healthy production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This tricky process occurs via aerobic cellular respiration, a key metabolic process your body uses to create energy.
    Since roughly 95 percent of your body’s energy is supplied this way, CoQ10’s role in efficiently generating ATP, and therefore the energy your body needs, is critical.
    In the human body, the highest concentrations of CoQ10 can be found in the organs with the highest energy requirements, such as the heart, brain and liver.
    What Can CoQ10 Do for You?

    CoQ10 supports every muscle contraction, your immune system, as well as every bit of energy production sourced from metabolic processes. Additionally, CoQ10 offers your body powerful antioxidant protection. It possesses the ability to transport electrons, thereby protecting your cells from damaging free radicals.
    Should You Take a CoQ10 Supplement?

    Since CoQ10 levels can be compromised by so many factors, it is advised that people over the age of 30 take a CoQ10 supplement. As we age, CoQ10 production is reduced significantly and it is believed that by the age of 80, our CoQ10 levels can be lower than they were at birth.
    Certain lifestyle factors or health concerns create a need for higher CoQ10 levels such as being a high-performance athlete, being a heart attack survivor or taking statin drugs.
    How Much CoQ10 Should You Take?

    Studies involving CoQ10 have used doses ranging from 30 mg to 1,200 mg. The general guideline is to take 1 mg per pound of body weight. So someone who weighs 150 lbs. would supplement with 150 mg of CoQ10. However, proper CoQ10 supplementation is dependent upon many factors. Here are some more specific guidelines you can reference and discuss with your physician.
    Health Concern or Objective CoQ10 mg/day
    Statin drug use 200-300 mg/day depending on statin dosing
    Improved athletic performance 60mg/day
    Reduce fatigue 50-150 mg/day
    Migraine headache sufferers 100-150 mg/ day
    Congestive heart failure 50 to 300 mg/ day
    High blood pressure 50 to 150 mg/ day
    Post heart attack 120-200 mg/day
    Huntington’s disease 600mg/ day
    Parkinson’s disease 500-1200 mg
    Why Do I Need More CoQ10 If I’m On a Statin Drug?

    Statin drugs inhibit the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, HMG-CoA reductase. While this is effective for reducing the amount of cholesterol your body produces, it also interrupts some of your body’s natural functions, such as the production of CoQ10. This dramatic drop in CoQ10 can lead to fatigue, muscle aches and weakness.
    Dietary CoQ10 can be obtained from organ meats and fatty fish such as salmon. However, most of the body’s CoQ10 comes from its own production, so be sure to meet your micronutrient needs and discuss any CoQ10 limiting medications with your physician. If you want to ensure that your CoQ10 levels stay optimal as you age, your best bet is to take a CoQ10 supplement.- By Casie Terry Mace, Certified Nutrition Counselor and an American Association of Nutritional Counselors (AANC) professional member.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lronFist View Post

    ALA is not an enzyme and it is lipid soluble (its amphipathic, actually).
    I believe you are taking things out of context. I know ALA is not an enzyme obviously...ALA is fatty acid that exists in the mitochondria and is involved in energy metabolism, gives a short but potent reduction of oxidation by increasing anti-oxidant enzymes... Which is the first 2 enzymes you've listed...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamski View Post
    I believe you are taking things out of context. I know ALA is not an enzyme obviously...ALA is fatty acid that exists in the mitochondria and is involved in energy metabolism, gives a short but potent reduction of oxidation by increasing anti-oxidant enzymes... Which is the first 2 enzymes you've listed...
    You keep backtracking. First you said coq10 was the only endogenous antioxidant (post 21). It's not.

    You then said you were talking about antioxidants which were not enzymes and were lipid soluble. ALA is not an enzyme and is also lipid soluble.

    Although it does participate in reductive enzymatic processes, ALA itself is an antioxidant and exists in far more places then just the mitochondria (plasma, cystosol).

    Feel free to keep digging yourself a hole.
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    I'm not digging myself in a hole. CoQ10 is the only lipid soluble antioxidant synthesized in the body. I added that in my second post to clear it up but then you interpreted it the wrong way. By all means I'm not trying to start anything on here because its pointless but I was trying to clear it up, which obviously I didn't.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamski View Post
    I'm not digging myself in a hole. CoQ10 is the only lipid soluble antioxidant synthesized in the body.
    Once again, ALA is lipid soluble and is endogenously synthesized from octanoic acid.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lronFist View Post

    Once again, ALA is lipid soluble and is endogenously synthesized from octanoic acid.
    I understand that, but now this is getting repetitive. You told me ALA is amphipathic, water and fat soluble, yes. Not going against what your word is. i know its jumbled up but thats what ya get when I'm responding on my phone. Plus, I'm talking about solely lipid soluble. I've read up about CoQ10 because my father is deficient and it helps with heart failure due to its role as an ETC and potent antioxidant. I appreciate you trying to shed light on the matter and help with the knowledge, but my question was answered.
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