Dextrose/Table sugar?

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    Dextrose/Table sugar?


    Is there a difference between the 2, besides one coming from corn and the other from sugarcane?
    Always open light. It’s not what you open with, it’s what you finish with. Louie Simmons

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    Dextrose is nearly pure glucose. It will SPIKE your insulin through the roof leading to fat gain. Table sugar is less sweet and not as high on the GI scale although it is still very high. You should ONLY have these carbs Post workout and even that might be pushing it. I stay away from them because they are not needed in order to fill glycogen stores post workout. All they will do is increase insulin levels past what they need to be which leads to an eventual crash in energy and fat storage.

    Oatmeal FTW?
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    Like said above, dextrose is just glucose. Table sugar (sucrose) is glucose bonded to fructose IIRC. Neither is derived from corn AFAIK, do you mean maltodextrin (in which corn is the source)?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagleman003 View Post
    Dextrose is nearly pure glucose. It will SPIKE your insulin through the roof leading to fat gain. Table sugar is less sweet and not as high on the GI scale although it is still very high. You should ONLY have these carbs Post workout and even that might be pushing it. I stay away from them because they are not needed in order to fill glycogen stores post workout. All they will do is increase insulin levels past what they need to be which leads to an eventual crash in energy and fat storage.

    Oatmeal FTW?
    Moderate to high gi carbs are best at replenishing glycogen post workout. As far as dextrose leading to fat gain, well you'll have to consume a lot AND BE LAZY for that to happen. Staying away from dextrose is nothing to be afraid of. Muscle cells are high receptive post workout and the high gi carb is the way to go. Numerous studies back dextrose and whey combinations. An energy crash postworkout after consuming a high gi/whey drink can be easily avoided by consuming a high protein meal with low gi carbs 30-45 minutes after. As far as oatmeal replenishing glycogen better than dextrose, whatever.
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    If you're afraid to consume high gi carbs choose moderate gi instead.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOYFORDOLET View Post
    Like said above, dextrose is just glucose. Table sugar (sucrose) is glucose bonded to fructose IIRC. Neither is derived from corn AFAIK,
    dextrose is synthesized almost exclusively from corn.
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    Dextrose is from corn. The only time I consume it is Post w/o. I just wanted to know if sugar was an option instead of dextrose.
    Always open light. It’s not what you open with, it’s what you finish with. Louie Simmons
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    My college professor told me that dextrose doesnt uplaod into the blood stream fast enough for it to be actually utilized the way we believe it is be utilized. The insulin spike occurs in the stomach, and not in the actual muscles you used during your workout for recovery. Waxy Maize starch uploads fast enough to be utilized by the muscles. Iwoudl recommend staying away from dextrose, and using waxy for the insulin spike pre or post wkout.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZMIDLYF View Post
    Dextrose is from corn. The only time I consume it is Post w/o. I just wanted to know if sugar was an option instead of dextrose.
    I have used powderd sugar before but i felt nothing but a bloated gut in all honesty.
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    It was the opposite with me. The WMS bloated me and I felt nothing as far as recovered after my w/o. Went to dextrose and bang...felt great after with no bloat. I just wanted to see if common table sugar was going to provide the same results and if anyone had info on it.
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    I am going to start doing the WMS thing on Monday. I don't want to overload it though so I think I am going to stay around 30-50g of WMS post WO. I hear a lot of people say that 75-100 is not necessary unless you have just ran a marathon. Anyone have any other opinions?
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZMIDLYF View Post
    It was the opposite with me. The WMS bloated me and I felt nothing as far as recovered after my w/o. Went to dextrose and bang...felt great after with no bloat. I just wanted to see if common table sugar was going to provide the same results and if anyone had info on it.
    Common table sugar will not
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggravated View Post
    I am going to start doing the WMS thing on Monday. I don't want to overload it though so I think I am going to stay around 30-50g of WMS post WO. I hear a lot of people say that 75-100 is not necessary unless you have just ran a marathon. Anyone have any other opinions?
    30-50 is perfect. In growth phases i might go up to 60 but only on leg days. Anything over this is a waste of money.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatMeat View Post
    dextrose is synthesized almost exclusively from corn.
    I stand corrected, I was unnaware of this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilGiant View Post
    My college professor told me that dextrose doesnt uplaod into the blood stream fast enough for it to be actually utilized the way we believe it is be utilized. The insulin spike occurs in the stomach, and not in the actual muscles you used during your workout for recovery. Waxy Maize starch uploads fast enough to be utilized by the muscles. Iwoudl recommend staying away from dextrose, and using waxy for the insulin spike pre or post wkout.
    This makes no sense at all. That professor is ignoring countless scientific data on dextrose. The uptake in the muscles occur after the high gi carb/protein drink is consumed. As far as Waxy Maize starch being faster than dextrose, please. I seriously doubt the gi of wms is higher than that of dextrose.
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    YOU DO NOT NEED TO SPIKE INSULIN TO SHUTTLE CARBS INTO MUSCLE'S and LIVER PWO.

    Go to your local food store and pick-up instant flavored oatmeal. Each pack contains 30 grams of carbs that are yummy. Go mix 2-3 packs of those with whey protein in a blender after you microwaved it and BAM - your on your way to growth WITHOUT the extra fat gain.

    Dextrose DOES NOT fill glycogen stores that much more PWO when compared to something of a lower GI. It is not worth the risk of a high insulin spike and possible fat storage.
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    Carbohydrate Timing: Enhance Muscle Growth, Fat Loss and Workout Performance

    by Paul Cribb, B.H.Sci HMS
    AST Director of Research

    Muscle glycogen is the athlete’s storage form of carbohydrate and the primary fuel that powers intense exercise.[1] A number of studies have demonstrated that intense resistance training can significantly decrease muscle glycogen stores, much more severely than previously suspected. [4-7] If you restrict your carbohydrate intake (as most bodybuilders do), you run a real risk of training constantly on carb-depleted muscles.

    Weight training with low muscle glycogen levels means weak muscles [8] decreased force production, [9] and significantly reduced strength. [10] Muscle glycogen stores govern weight lifting performance, and the ability to train intensely day-in, day-out. [4-10] Glycogen-full muscles means greater work capacity and greater intensity and this adds up to a more powerful growth stimulus.

    Bodybuilders need carbohydrates to train intensely, build muscle and get shredded. However, to obtain optimal muscle glycogen stores, a high carbohydrate diet is not required nor recommended. The answer is carbohydrate timing. The intake of the right carbohydrates at just the right time results in more effective muscle glycogen accumulation, better recovery and a more potent muscle growth stimulus.


    CARBOHYDRATE TIMING: WHAT IS IT? WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES?
    A lot of bodybuilders do not understand that the strategic consumption of carbohydrates just before and after intense training not only determines the success of today’s workout, but also the glycogen levels that fuel tomorrow’s workout. That’s right, restoring muscle glycogen for tomorrow’s workout starts as before you hit the gym today

    The total amount of glycogen synthesized in muscle over a 24-hour period is directly correlated to the timing of carbohydrate ingestion after a workout.[2,3] If carbohydrates are not consumed in the workout period, zero muscle glycogen synthesis [11] and an empty fuel tank for tomorrow’s workout is the result. Where as a few strategic servings of an easily absorbed carbohydrate consumed close to training will guarantee a high glycogen synthesis rate [12,13] and glycogen-filled muscles to power cellular growth.

    Don’t underestimate the importance of carb timing for triggering glycogen synthesis after a workout. Not only is a bodybuilders total work capacity correlated directly to the amount of glucose/glycogen held within muscle, the process of glycogen accumulation triggers an immediate “cell volumizing” effect, a potent anabolic response. The right carbohydrate timing strategy will amplify the anabolic stimulus of resistance training.[1,3,20]



    The research on carbohydrate intake and weight lifting shows that the consumption of a carbohydrate supplement just before (or during) an intense workout can save valuable muscle glycogen stores from complete depletion, as well as enhance total lifting capacity during the workout. [15,16] While training without using a carb supplement before weight training results in muscle carb depletion, and poor weight training performance [14], supplementing just before or during training, results in only a 13.7% decrease in muscle glycogen content and more weight lifted, for more reps in every working set [16-18]

    A carbohydrate supplement consumed immediately before or after weight training is shown to directly affect the hormonal response. Taken before training, a carb supplement will maintain blood sugar levels, and restore insulin levels. The presence of insulin is vital for stimulating muscle protein synthesis rates. [19] A carb supplement taken immediately after training increases insulin concentration while decreasing 3-methylhistidine and urea nitrogen excretion (all examples of reduced muscle breakdown).[20]

    Consuming a carbohydrate supplement after resistance training also enhances the growth hormone response and reduces circulating cortisol concentrations.[21,22] Cortisol is the number one glucocorticoids hormone that is responsible for muscle breakdown. Carb timing stops cortisol elevation dead in its tracks.

    The benefits are as clear as night and day, and the strategy is remarkably simple. Be sure to consume a dose of carbohydrates just before and immediately after your Max-OT training session, it will enhance work capacity and the hormonal anabolic response from weight training.


    DON’T FORGET CREATINE AND GLUTAMINE
    Carbohydrate synthesis is a cellular anabolic activator within muscle. Recent research has shown that the supplements creatine and glutamine both act synergistically with glucose to maximize glycogen accumulation in muscle. [23, 24] When taken straight after training, a 7-10gram dose of glutamine combined with carbohydrates, results is better glycogen accumulation throughout the entire body than either supplement taken alone.

    Creatine-filled muscles store more carbohydrates that results in greater work capacity. So to obtain an optimal glycogen restoration after every workout, be sure to incorporate a 5-gram serving of micronized creatine in your pre and post workout shake, and a 5-15-gram serving of GL-3 glutamine in your post workout shake.


    WHAT KIND OF CARBS ARE BEST?
    Bowtell and colleagues have shown that glucose is the better choice of carbohydrate to consume around the training session. [26] Pure glucose does not require digestion and it promotes more rapid restoration of muscle glycogen levels than other carbohydrates. When taken immediately after weight training, a dose of glucose (1-gram/kg body weight) was highly effective in preventing muscle breakdown and providing a more positive protein balance in a group of bodybuilders. [20] This strategic dose of glucose also helped to increase the glycogen content of the bodybuilder’s muscles to levels higher than seen before training.

    HOW MUCH?
    Most of the research that has demonstrated positive effects from carb intake during weight training has used a dose of around 1-gram per kilogram of body weight within the immediate training period. Some research has followed this dose with another 1-hour after training and this completely restored muscle glycogen levels.[20]

    Therefore, a 200-pound bodybuilder (approx 94kgs) should probably aim to consume a 45-gram dose of glucose before and after bodybuilding workouts, and, possibly, another dose an hour later. A scoop of Creatine HSC provides 5-grams of micronized creatine and 34-grams of carbs and is an excellent pre and post workout supplement. However, some athletes may need to increase the carb portion of this serving to be sure of optimal glycogen restoration for their next workout. In fact, the effect of carbohydrate (glucose) consumption within the training period seems to exert such potent anabolic effects, I strongly suspect that most lean bodybuilders would obtain greater results from their training if they increased there carbohydrate intake during this period. Remember, the carbs you consume during the workout period exert a direct anabolic effect, they go directly towards muscle recovery and growth. [27] This is where supplementing the diet with a product like DGC can be so invaluable.

    DCG is an incredibly simple, yet effective supplement bodybuilders can use to strategically increase there carbohydrate intake. One teaspoon provides 5-grams of pure glucose, no digestion is required and rapid absorption is assured. This makes DGC perfect for increasing carbohydrate intake at the precise times an athlete needs it. Bodybuilders can add DGC to their pre and post workout shakes to ensure they obtain the right amount of carbs that ensures muscle glycogen stores are replenished.

    Another simple supplement timing strategy that bodybuilders can employ that will send muscle protein synthesis rates through the roof is the timing of particular amino acids and glucose in the pre and post workout period.

    If an abundant supply of essential amino acids and glucose is in circulation during intense training, the anabolic response from weight training more than triples [25] Imagine, triple the results every time you wrap your hands around a barbell. I believe this “timing phenomenon”, that is, making sure key nutrients are circulating to muscles during training, is the single most effective strategy a drug-free athlete can utilize to pack on lean muscle mass fast. Read about this incredible muscle building technique in The Bracketing Method.


    References:
    1. John L. Ivy, Harold W. Goforth Jr., Bruce M. Damon, Thomas R. McCauley, Edward C. Parsons, and Thomas B. Price. Early postexercise muscle glycogen recovery is enhanced with a carbohydrate-protein supplement. J. Appl. Physiol. 93 4, 1337-1344, 2002.

    2. Bergström, J, Hermansen L, Hultman E, and Saltin B. Diet, muscle glycogen and physical performance. Acta Physiol Scand 71: 140-150, 1967
    3. Haff, G.G., M.J. Lehmkuhl, L.B. McCoy, and M.H. Stone. Carbohydrate supplementation and resistance training. J of Strength and Conditioning Research. 17;1:187–196, 2003.

    4. MacDougall, J.D., S. Ray, D.G. Sale, N. McCartney, P. Lee, and S. Garner. Muscle substrate utilization and lactate production during weightlifting. Can. J. Appl. Physiol. 24:209–215. 1999.

    5. Robergs, R.A., D.R. Pearson, D.L. Costill, W.J. Fink, D.D. Pascoe, M.A. Benedict, C.P. Lambert, and J.J. Zachweija. Muscle glycogenolysis during differing intensities of weight-resistance exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 70:1700–1706. 1991.
    6. Tesch, P.A., E.B. Colliander, and P. Kaiser. Muscle metabolism during intense, heavy-resistance exercise. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 55:362–366. 1986.

    7. Tesch, P.A., L.L. Ploutz-Snyder, L. Yström, M. Castro, and G. Dudley. Skeletal muscle glycogen loss evoked by resistance exercise. J. Strength Cond. Res. 12:67–73. 1998.

    8. Yaspelkis, B.B.D., J.G. Patterson, P.A. Anderla, Z. Ding, and J.L. Ivy. Carbohydrate supplementation spares muscle glycogen during variable-intensity exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 75:1477–1485. 1993.

    9. Jacobs, I., P. Kaiser, and P. Tesch. Muscle strength and fatigue after selective glycogen depletion in human skeletal muscle fibers. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 46:47–53. 1981.

    10. Hepburn, D., and R.J. Maughan. Glycogen availability as a limiting factor in performance of isometric exercise. J. Physiol. 342:52–53P. 1982.

    11. Costill, D.L., W.M. Sherman, W.J. Fink, C. Maresh, M. Witten, and J.M. Miller. The role of dietary carbohydrates in muscle glycogen resynthesis after strenuous running. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 34:1831–1836. 1981.

    12. Ivy, J.L., A.L. Katz, C.L. Cutler, W.M. Sherman, and E.F. Coyle. Muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise: Effect of time of carbohydrate ingestion. J. Appl. Physiol. 64:1480–1485. 1988.

    13. Ivy, J.L., M.C. Lee, J.T. Brozinick, and M.J. Reed. Muscle glycogen storage after different amounts of carbohydrate ingestion. J. Appl. Physiol. 65:2018–2023. 1988.

    14. Leveritt, M., and P.J. Abernethy. Effects of carbohydrate restriction on strength performance. J. Strength Cond. Res. 13:52–57. 1999.

    15. Hakkinen, K., A. Pakarinen, M. Alen, H. Kauhanen, and P.V. Komi. Daily hormonal and neuromuscular responses to intensive strength training in 1 week. Int. J. Sports Med. 9:422–428. 1988.

    16. Lambert, C.P., M.G. Flynn, J.B. Boone, T.J. Michaud, and J. Rodriguez-Zayas. Effects of carbohydrate feeding on multiple-bout resistance exercise. J. Appl. Sport Sci. Res. 5:192–197. 1991.

    17. Haff, G.G., C.A. Schroeder, A.J. Koch, K.E. Kuphal, M.J. Comeau, and J.A. Potteiger. The effects of supplemental carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent isokinetic leg exercise. J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness. 41:216–222. 2001.

    18. Haff, G.G., M.H. Stone, B.J. Warren, R. Keith, R.L. Johnson, D.C. Nieman, F. Williams, and K.B. Kirksey. The effect of carbohydrate supplementation on multiple sessions and bouts of resistance exercise. J. Strength Cond. Res. 13:111–117. 1999.

    19. Biolo G., BD Williams, RY Declan Fleming and RR Wolfe. Insulin action on muscle protein kinetics and amino acid transport during recovery after resistance training. Diabetes 48: 949-957, 1999.

    20. Roy, B.D., M.A. Tarnopolsky, J.D. MacDougall, J. Fowles, and K.E. Yarasheski. Effect of glucose supplement timing on protein metabolism after resistance training. J. Appl. Physiol. 82:1882–1888. 1997.

    21. Chandler, R.M., H.K. Byrne, J.G. Patterson, and J.L. Ivy. Dietary supplements affect the anabolic hormones after weight-training exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 76:839–845. 1994.

    22. Kraemer, W.J., J.S. Volek, J.A. Bush, M. Putukian, and W.J. Sebastianelli. Hormonal responses to consecutive days of heavy-resistance exercise with or without nutritional supplementation. J. Appl. Physiol. 85:1544–1555. 1998.

    23. Bowtell JM, K Gelly, M L Jackman, A Patel, M Simeoni, and M J Rennie. Effect of oral glutamine on whole body carbohydrate storage during recovery from exhaustive exercise. J Appl Physiol 86: 1770-1777, 1999

    24. Nelson, AG., DA Arnall, J Kokkonen, R Day, and J. Evans. Muscle glycogen supercompensation is enhanced by prior creatine supplementation. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., 33; 7: 1096-1100, 2001.

    25. Blake B. Rasmussen, Kevin D. Tipton, Sharon L. Miller, Steven E. Wolf, and Robert R. Wolfe. An oral essential amino acid-carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle protein anabolism after resistance exercise. J Appl Physiol 88: 386-392, 2000.

    26. Bowtell JL, K. Gelly, ML Jackman, A Patel, M. Simeoni, and M. J. Rennie Effect of different carbohydrate drinks on whole body carbohydrate storage after exhaustive exercise. J Appl Physiol 88: 1529-1536, 2000.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick28 View Post
    Carbohydrate Timing: Enhance Muscle Growth, Fat Loss and Workout Performance

    by Paul Cribb, B.H.Sci HMS
    AST Director of Research

    Muscle glycogen is the athlete’s storage form of carbohydrate and the primary fuel that powers intense exercise.[1] A number of studies have demonstrated that intense resistance training can significantly decrease muscle glycogen stores, much more severely than previously suspected. [4-7] If you restrict your carbohydrate intake (as most bodybuilders do), you run a real risk of training constantly on carb-depleted muscles.

    Weight training with low muscle glycogen levels means weak muscles [8] decreased force production, [9] and significantly reduced strength. [10] Muscle glycogen stores govern weight lifting performance, and the ability to train intensely day-in, day-out. [4-10] Glycogen-full muscles means greater work capacity and greater intensity and this adds up to a more powerful growth stimulus.

    Bodybuilders need carbohydrates to train intensely, build muscle and get shredded. However, to obtain optimal muscle glycogen stores, a high carbohydrate diet is not required nor recommended. The answer is carbohydrate timing. The intake of the right carbohydrates at just the right time results in more effective muscle glycogen accumulation, better recovery and a more potent muscle growth stimulus.


    CARBOHYDRATE TIMING: WHAT IS IT? WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES?
    A lot of bodybuilders do not understand that the strategic consumption of carbohydrates just before and after intense training not only determines the success of today’s workout, but also the glycogen levels that fuel tomorrow’s workout. That’s right, restoring muscle glycogen for tomorrow’s workout starts as before you hit the gym today

    The total amount of glycogen synthesized in muscle over a 24-hour period is directly correlated to the timing of carbohydrate ingestion after a workout.[2,3] If carbohydrates are not consumed in the workout period, zero muscle glycogen synthesis [11] and an empty fuel tank for tomorrow’s workout is the result. Where as a few strategic servings of an easily absorbed carbohydrate consumed close to training will guarantee a high glycogen synthesis rate [12,13] and glycogen-filled muscles to power cellular growth.

    Don’t underestimate the importance of carb timing for triggering glycogen synthesis after a workout. Not only is a bodybuilders total work capacity correlated directly to the amount of glucose/glycogen held within muscle, the process of glycogen accumulation triggers an immediate “cell volumizing” effect, a potent anabolic response. The right carbohydrate timing strategy will amplify the anabolic stimulus of resistance training.[1,3,20]



    The research on carbohydrate intake and weight lifting shows that the consumption of a carbohydrate supplement just before (or during) an intense workout can save valuable muscle glycogen stores from complete depletion, as well as enhance total lifting capacity during the workout. [15,16] While training without using a carb supplement before weight training results in muscle carb depletion, and poor weight training performance [14], supplementing just before or during training, results in only a 13.7% decrease in muscle glycogen content and more weight lifted, for more reps in every working set [16-18]

    A carbohydrate supplement consumed immediately before or after weight training is shown to directly affect the hormonal response. Taken before training, a carb supplement will maintain blood sugar levels, and restore insulin levels. The presence of insulin is vital for stimulating muscle protein synthesis rates. [19] A carb supplement taken immediately after training increases insulin concentration while decreasing 3-methylhistidine and urea nitrogen excretion (all examples of reduced muscle breakdown).[20]

    Consuming a carbohydrate supplement after resistance training also enhances the growth hormone response and reduces circulating cortisol concentrations.[21,22] Cortisol is the number one glucocorticoids hormone that is responsible for muscle breakdown. Carb timing stops cortisol elevation dead in its tracks.

    The benefits are as clear as night and day, and the strategy is remarkably simple. Be sure to consume a dose of carbohydrates just before and immediately after your Max-OT training session, it will enhance work capacity and the hormonal anabolic response from weight training.


    DON’T FORGET CREATINE AND GLUTAMINE
    Carbohydrate synthesis is a cellular anabolic activator within muscle. Recent research has shown that the supplements creatine and glutamine both act synergistically with glucose to maximize glycogen accumulation in muscle. [23, 24] When taken straight after training, a 7-10gram dose of glutamine combined with carbohydrates, results is better glycogen accumulation throughout the entire body than either supplement taken alone.

    Creatine-filled muscles store more carbohydrates that results in greater work capacity. So to obtain an optimal glycogen restoration after every workout, be sure to incorporate a 5-gram serving of micronized creatine in your pre and post workout shake, and a 5-15-gram serving of GL-3 glutamine in your post workout shake.


    WHAT KIND OF CARBS ARE BEST?
    Bowtell and colleagues have shown that glucose is the better choice of carbohydrate to consume around the training session. [26] Pure glucose does not require digestion and it promotes more rapid restoration of muscle glycogen levels than other carbohydrates. When taken immediately after weight training, a dose of glucose (1-gram/kg body weight) was highly effective in preventing muscle breakdown and providing a more positive protein balance in a group of bodybuilders. [20] This strategic dose of glucose also helped to increase the glycogen content of the bodybuilder’s muscles to levels higher than seen before training.

    HOW MUCH?
    Most of the research that has demonstrated positive effects from carb intake during weight training has used a dose of around 1-gram per kilogram of body weight within the immediate training period. Some research has followed this dose with another 1-hour after training and this completely restored muscle glycogen levels.[20]

    Therefore, a 200-pound bodybuilder (approx 94kgs) should probably aim to consume a 45-gram dose of glucose before and after bodybuilding workouts, and, possibly, another dose an hour later. A scoop of Creatine HSC provides 5-grams of micronized creatine and 34-grams of carbs and is an excellent pre and post workout supplement. However, some athletes may need to increase the carb portion of this serving to be sure of optimal glycogen restoration for their next workout. In fact, the effect of carbohydrate (glucose) consumption within the training period seems to exert such potent anabolic effects, I strongly suspect that most lean bodybuilders would obtain greater results from their training if they increased there carbohydrate intake during this period. Remember, the carbs you consume during the workout period exert a direct anabolic effect, they go directly towards muscle recovery and growth. [27] This is where supplementing the diet with a product like DGC can be so invaluable.

    DCG is an incredibly simple, yet effective supplement bodybuilders can use to strategically increase there carbohydrate intake. One teaspoon provides 5-grams of pure glucose, no digestion is required and rapid absorption is assured. This makes DGC perfect for increasing carbohydrate intake at the precise times an athlete needs it. Bodybuilders can add DGC to their pre and post workout shakes to ensure they obtain the right amount of carbs that ensures muscle glycogen stores are replenished.

    Another simple supplement timing strategy that bodybuilders can employ that will send muscle protein synthesis rates through the roof is the timing of particular amino acids and glucose in the pre and post workout period.

    If an abundant supply of essential amino acids and glucose is in circulation during intense training, the anabolic response from weight training more than triples [25] Imagine, triple the results every time you wrap your hands around a barbell. I believe this “timing phenomenon”, that is, making sure key nutrients are circulating to muscles during training, is the single most effective strategy a drug-free athlete can utilize to pack on lean muscle mass fast. Read about this incredible muscle building technique in The Bracketing Method.


    References:
    1. John L. Ivy, Harold W. Goforth Jr., Bruce M. Damon, Thomas R. McCauley, Edward C. Parsons, and Thomas B. Price. Early postexercise muscle glycogen recovery is enhanced with a carbohydrate-protein supplement. J. Appl. Physiol. 93 4, 1337-1344, 2002.

    2. Bergström, J, Hermansen L, Hultman E, and Saltin B. Diet, muscle glycogen and physical performance. Acta Physiol Scand 71: 140-150, 1967
    3. Haff, G.G., M.J. Lehmkuhl, L.B. McCoy, and M.H. Stone. Carbohydrate supplementation and resistance training. J of Strength and Conditioning Research. 17;1:187–196, 2003.

    4. MacDougall, J.D., S. Ray, D.G. Sale, N. McCartney, P. Lee, and S. Garner. Muscle substrate utilization and lactate production during weightlifting. Can. J. Appl. Physiol. 24:209–215. 1999.

    5. Robergs, R.A., D.R. Pearson, D.L. Costill, W.J. Fink, D.D. Pascoe, M.A. Benedict, C.P. Lambert, and J.J. Zachweija. Muscle glycogenolysis during differing intensities of weight-resistance exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 70:1700–1706. 1991.
    6. Tesch, P.A., E.B. Colliander, and P. Kaiser. Muscle metabolism during intense, heavy-resistance exercise. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 55:362–366. 1986.

    7. Tesch, P.A., L.L. Ploutz-Snyder, L. Yström, M. Castro, and G. Dudley. Skeletal muscle glycogen loss evoked by resistance exercise. J. Strength Cond. Res. 12:67–73. 1998.

    8. Yaspelkis, B.B.D., J.G. Patterson, P.A. Anderla, Z. Ding, and J.L. Ivy. Carbohydrate supplementation spares muscle glycogen during variable-intensity exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 75:1477–1485. 1993.

    9. Jacobs, I., P. Kaiser, and P. Tesch. Muscle strength and fatigue after selective glycogen depletion in human skeletal muscle fibers. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 46:47–53. 1981.

    10. Hepburn, D., and R.J. Maughan. Glycogen availability as a limiting factor in performance of isometric exercise. J. Physiol. 342:52–53P. 1982.

    11. Costill, D.L., W.M. Sherman, W.J. Fink, C. Maresh, M. Witten, and J.M. Miller. The role of dietary carbohydrates in muscle glycogen resynthesis after strenuous running. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 34:1831–1836. 1981.

    12. Ivy, J.L., A.L. Katz, C.L. Cutler, W.M. Sherman, and E.F. Coyle. Muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise: Effect of time of carbohydrate ingestion. J. Appl. Physiol. 64:1480–1485. 1988.

    13. Ivy, J.L., M.C. Lee, J.T. Brozinick, and M.J. Reed. Muscle glycogen storage after different amounts of carbohydrate ingestion. J. Appl. Physiol. 65:2018–2023. 1988.

    14. Leveritt, M., and P.J. Abernethy. Effects of carbohydrate restriction on strength performance. J. Strength Cond. Res. 13:52–57. 1999.

    15. Hakkinen, K., A. Pakarinen, M. Alen, H. Kauhanen, and P.V. Komi. Daily hormonal and neuromuscular responses to intensive strength training in 1 week. Int. J. Sports Med. 9:422–428. 1988.

    16. Lambert, C.P., M.G. Flynn, J.B. Boone, T.J. Michaud, and J. Rodriguez-Zayas. Effects of carbohydrate feeding on multiple-bout resistance exercise. J. Appl. Sport Sci. Res. 5:192–197. 1991.

    17. Haff, G.G., C.A. Schroeder, A.J. Koch, K.E. Kuphal, M.J. Comeau, and J.A. Potteiger. The effects of supplemental carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent isokinetic leg exercise. J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness. 41:216–222. 2001.

    18. Haff, G.G., M.H. Stone, B.J. Warren, R. Keith, R.L. Johnson, D.C. Nieman, F. Williams, and K.B. Kirksey. The effect of carbohydrate supplementation on multiple sessions and bouts of resistance exercise. J. Strength Cond. Res. 13:111–117. 1999.

    19. Biolo G., BD Williams, RY Declan Fleming and RR Wolfe. Insulin action on muscle protein kinetics and amino acid transport during recovery after resistance training. Diabetes 48: 949-957, 1999.

    20. Roy, B.D., M.A. Tarnopolsky, J.D. MacDougall, J. Fowles, and K.E. Yarasheski. Effect of glucose supplement timing on protein metabolism after resistance training. J. Appl. Physiol. 82:1882–1888. 1997.

    21. Chandler, R.M., H.K. Byrne, J.G. Patterson, and J.L. Ivy. Dietary supplements affect the anabolic hormones after weight-training exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 76:839–845. 1994.

    22. Kraemer, W.J., J.S. Volek, J.A. Bush, M. Putukian, and W.J. Sebastianelli. Hormonal responses to consecutive days of heavy-resistance exercise with or without nutritional supplementation. J. Appl. Physiol. 85:1544–1555. 1998.

    23. Bowtell JM, K Gelly, M L Jackman, A Patel, M Simeoni, and M J Rennie. Effect of oral glutamine on whole body carbohydrate storage during recovery from exhaustive exercise. J Appl Physiol 86: 1770-1777, 1999

    24. Nelson, AG., DA Arnall, J Kokkonen, R Day, and J. Evans. Muscle glycogen supercompensation is enhanced by prior creatine supplementation. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., 33; 7: 1096-1100, 2001.

    25. Blake B. Rasmussen, Kevin D. Tipton, Sharon L. Miller, Steven E. Wolf, and Robert R. Wolfe. An oral essential amino acid-carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle protein anabolism after resistance exercise. J Appl Physiol 88: 386-392, 2000.

    26. Bowtell JL, K. Gelly, ML Jackman, A Patel, M. Simeoni, and M. J. Rennie Effect of different carbohydrate drinks on whole body carbohydrate storage after exhaustive exercise. J Appl Physiol 88: 1529-1536, 2000.
    Congrats on finding an article and posting it. It states nothing about the difference in insulin spikes between a medium GI carb and a refined high GI carb PWO and what that difference means in terms of glycogen uptake into muscle cells.

    If you choose to use dextrose or oatmeal w/e its your choice. Just make sure you dose nearly .3-.5 x your BW PWO. I am 225 and I have around 125 carbs PWO 90 from oatmeal, 6 from whey protein and around 30 from bananas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagleman003 View Post
    Congrats on finding an article and posting it. It states nothing about the difference in insulin spikes between a medium GI carb and a refined high GI carb PWO and what that difference means in terms of glycogen uptake into muscle cells.
    I guess we're not reading the same thing. When reading this article, one can conclude that high gi carbs increase glycogen uptake better even if the article didn't mention low gi carbs specifically. Peace.
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    I've always read that you wanted a high GI carb after your w/o for the insulin spike, which in turn makes the nutrients(protein,creatine,BCA A,etc) quickly absorbed in your muscles.
    Always open light. It’s not what you open with, it’s what you finish with. Louie Simmons
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZMIDLYF View Post
    I've always read that you wanted a high GI carb after your w/o for the insulin spike, which in turn makes the nutrients(protein,creatine,BCA A,etc) quickly absorbed in your muscles.
    Science backs this up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick28 View Post
    Science backs this up.
    this had been argued to death by Bobo a while ago. Anyways, the only problem with the majority of these studies is that they are on fasting subjects..... this changes the equation entirely. Having existing food in your stomach and absorption occurring, which it should be as you never want to train fasted, pretty much throws the whole high vs. low GI stuff out the window. I still enjoy my WMS though, just for reasons that i'm usually not too ready to eat a bunch of solid food pwo.
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    Solid food right after lifting would make me hurl. I need to sit and drink something somewhat sweet that brings me back to functioning. I am just looking for other options available.
    Always open light. It’s not what you open with, it’s what you finish with. Louie Simmons
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    How to Optimize Your Anabolic Hormone Profile
    with the Right Nutrition


    by Paul Cribb, B.H.Sci HMS
    AST Director of Research

    In previous articles I presented some fantastic new research that should have drug-free bodybuilders embracing their barbell and dumbbells with delight This research showed that muscle actually produces its own IGF-1 in response to weight training

    Intense resistance training, using maximum overload is particularly effective at producing the big squirts of IGF-1 into the system [1]. Maybe this is one reason why Max-OT training is so effective Now, recent studies reveal that intense resistance training appears to be the all-important stimulus that rearranges IGF-1 binding proteins and turns inactive IGF-1 into active IGF-1.[1-3]

    However, this modulation of IGF-1 proteins within muscle to create active IGF-1 does not peak until six to 12 hours after training [1]. Interestingly, this is just about the time muscle protein synthesis rates start to peak. The dilemma is how to capitalize on this IGF-1 production to maximize natural muscle growth.

    There is scant research on this area of nutritional science, so I've had to dig deep and draw on some diverse areas in my application of the literature. However, if you've read my previous research articles you'll see I have not been wrong so far. What I'm going to cover now is the nutritional strategies you need to implement to optimize your body's anabolic hormone profile. First, remember these crucial points:

    • Don't drop your dietary fat intake too low, for too long. Athletes who consume diets ultra-low in fat (below 15% of total calorie content) probably have sub-optimal levels of circulating testosterone.

    • The type of protein you consume is also important. Men who include red meat in their diets possess higher concentrations of free (active) testosterone.[4]

    • Effective management of insulin appears to be all-important to prolonging the active life of IGF-1 production. Steady-state insulin levels are required for IGF and growth hormone (GH) to exert their maximum growth effects on muscle.[5]

    • Once insulin levels are restored they must be kept steady within a narrow, physiological range for the rest of the day. If you do not, then that nice squirt of GH and IGF-1 you've produced during training will be short-lived.[6]

    • IGF-1 is produced in a dose dependant fashion to protein intake [16]. So a high protein intake at all times is critical to IGF-1 production [17]. IGF-1 production is directly correlated to nitrogen balance [18]. That means, if you skip just one meal, IGF production will suffer.

    STEP-1 THE BRACKETING METHOD.
    • Bracket your training session with VP2 Whey Isolate and Creatine HSC. Mix one serving of each supplement in 15-ounces of ice-cold water and consume before and immediately after training. There is a lot of evidence that demonstrates this simple strategy will more than triple the anabolic stimulus and turn that hard training into net gains in muscle.[7-10]

    • Using a protein/carbohydrate liquid supplement at this time primes your hormonal profile for gains in lean mass.[7,11] It increases circulating IGF-1 levels and, if this procedure is followed after every session, the increases are substantial.[10]

    • The best post-training carbohydrate source you can use is glucose. It restores insulin levels the quickest and produces better glycogen accumulation within muscle.[15] That's why we include 34-grams of pure D-glucose in one serving of Creatine HSC.

    • This small serving of glucose will work to effectively restore insulin levels and provide a much needed fuel for muscle recovery. These carbohydrates will not be converted to fat, they will enhance your results [13]

    • It's next to useless to take your VP2 without some form of carbohydrate after intense training. Several researchers have shown that when a whey protein supplement is consumed in the presence of low insulin levels (such as after training), a vast majority is directed toward energy restoration (oxidative) pathways and not building muscle.[9,14]

    The bracketing method ensures that an abundant supply of amino acids gets directly to the exercised muscle after training, this is crucial to amplifying the anabolic response.[8] A surge of amino acids into blood amino acids at this time creates a super-compensation effect, and muscle cells are crammed-full of growth stimulating amino acids.[8] The only protein with the absorption kinetics to do this is VP2 Whey Isolate. Try using any other protein for this bracketing approach and all you'll get is nauseous.

    The short chain protein peptides in VP2 Whey Isolate are ideal - they deliver more nitrogen, faster to muscle than other proteins. VP2 is 30% peptide bound branch chain amino acids. High dose branch chain amino acids are also shown to be anabolic hormone optimizers.[7]

    If you are preparing for a contest and are limiting your calorie intake, simply adjust the serving size of each supplement to fit-in with your calorie requirements.


    STEP-2 MEAL-2
    That post-training VP2/HSC liquid meal will flood the bloodstream with growth-stimulating glucose and amino acids and restore insulin levels. That's good However, because of VP2's rapid absorption kinetics and glucose's impact on insulin, this anabolic effect will disappear quickly if another meal is not consumed within 20-30 minutes after training.

    • A carbohydrate that is slightly lower in glycemic index (a rating of 60-90) and low in fiber and fat is required for the next meal. A small serving of baked potato, steamed white rice or pasta is an excellent choice.

    • Combine this with a low fat protein such as tuna, chicken or egg whites. This small protein/carbohydrate meal will prevent the drastic drop in blood sugar and insulin levels that glucose consumption creates.[13]

    • A lot of bodybuilders use the post-workout meal as an excuse to pig out on junk foods such as burgers, fries or pizza. Don't. Nutrients wrapped in fat are absorbed too slowly for this crucial period. They short-circuit your chance for optimal uptake of nutrients by hungry muscles.

    • For the post-training period we're specifically after rapid absorption, which means low fiber and fat.


    STEP-3 MEAL-3
    The selection of the nutritional material for this next meal is critical. Net gains in muscle mass appear to be a product of inhibiting protein breakdown while stimulating protein synthesis rates. Muscle breakdown rates are accelerated for many hours after intense training - if left unchecked they will override synthesis rates, and net gains in muscle will be zero.[10]

    This next meal must be effective in preventing prolonged muscle breakdown, while enhancing anabolism and keeping insulin levels rock-steady. You can easily meet all these requirements and set the stage for optimal gains simply by consuming one serving of Ny-Tro PRO-40 soon after this solid-food meal.

    • Research now shows that different proteins have different absorption rates, and they have a distinctly different impact on whole body protein metabolism.[14]

    • Whey and casein are the major milk proteins, and they vary greatly in their ability to present amino acids to muscle and other tissue. The consumption of whey and casein-based proteins have an entirely different impact on protein dynamics (proteolysis/synthesis) and whole body protein retention.[14]

    • Using state of the art amino acid tracer techniques, research shows a 30-gram dose of whey protein causes a large, rapid increase in amino acid availability (plasma aminoacidemia) that stimulates a dramatic increase in protein synthesis rates (that's why you use VP2 before and after immediately after training). However, it appears that whey protein has zero impact on preventing protein breakdown.[9,14]

    • Casein is much slower absorbing and does not produce a dramatic response in protein synthesis rates. However, because casein provides slower release of amino acids into the bloodstream, it provides a more constant uptake by tissues and inhibits protein breakdown much better than whey. This ability of casein to inhibit of protein breakdown results in a more efficient utilization of amino acids.

    • Ny-Tro Pro-40 is a precision blend of slower releasing (casein-based) proteins, that will effectively halt muscle breakdown and provide a constant source of amino acids to muscle. (That's why you need to take one serving within the hour after training.)

    • Supplementing with VP2 Whey Isolate first and then Ny-Tro Pro-40 within the hour after intense training provides a potent anabolic stimulating effect along with effective inhibition of protein breakdown. This is the ideal protein selection.


    STEP-4 MEAL-4
    Research has shown that nutrient transport to the exercised muscle is tremendously accelerated for up to three-hours post training. Capitalize on this by consuming another small, solid food meal (similar to the first), and take another serving of VP2.

    Remember, for this period we're specifically after rapid assimilation - this means food choices that are low in fiber and fat. A neat trick I instruct athletes who are unaccustomed to this style of eating is to simply split their regular post-workout meal into two portions.

    Eat one-half within 30 minutes after training (after the VP2/carbohydrate drink) and the other meal (meal-4) two-hours later. Your previous meals have raised insulin levels so mix your VP2 and Micronized Creatine in ice-cold water. The practical application.

    • Don't drop your dietary fat intake too low. This will impair testosterone production.

    • Include red meat in your diet to provide high concentrations of free (active) testosterone.
    If you train at 6:30 AM your nutritional program should look like this:

    • 6:00 AM. Consume your first VP2 Whey Isolate and Creatine HSC shake.

    • 7:15 AM. Consume your second VP2 Whey Isolate and Creatine HSC shake. Use 15-ounces of cold water for these shakes.

    • 7:45 AM. Consume your first small solid food meal. Remember, this meal should contain some carbohydrate and some protein and minimal fiber. An egg white omelette with white rice mixed in, is an ideal choice.

    • 8:15 AM. While driving to work, sip on your Ny-Tro Pro-40 shake.

    • 9:45 AM. You should be thinking about your next solid food meal. Lucky you were clever enough to cut that omelette in half and take it with you in a container. Go nuke-it in the staff room microwave and add some chilli sauce

    • Don't forget to wash it down with your second serving of VP2. Even in plain old water this protein tastes fantastic.

    • This is also a great time to take other supplements like NAC 500, R-ALA 200, GL3 L-Glutamine and MultiPro 32X.
    No matter how busy your day gets, make sure you take time to optimize your nutrition within the hours after a workout. These hours appear to make or break your results from all those jaw-clenching, teeth-grinding hours spent in the gym.

    References:
    1. Carroll PV, Christ ER, Umpleby AM, et al. Diabetes, 49(5):789-96,2000.
    2. Zachwieja JJ, Yarasheski KE. Phys Ther. 79(1):76-82,1999.
    3. Bamman MM, et al. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 280:E383-E390, 2001.
    4. Hameed M, Harridge DR, Goldspink G. Exerci. Sport Sci Rev. 30:1;15-19, 2002.
    5. Endocrine Control of Growth, New York:Elsevier,1981.
    6. Tillmann V, Patel L, Gill MS, et al. Clin Endocrinol.53(3):329-336,2000.
    7. Kraemer WJ, Volek JS, Bush JA, et al. J.Appl.Physiol.85(4) 1544-1555,1998.
    8. Precision Supplement Timing - Part 4: Maximize Muscle Growth With Precise Timing of Supplementation.
    9. Rasmussen BB, Tipton KD, Miller SL, et al. J Appl Physiol. 88(2) p386-92, 2000.
    10. Wolfe RR. Protein supplements and exercise. Am.J.Clin. Nutr.72;2(2):551S-557S, 2000.
    11. Chandler RM; Byrne HK; Patterson JG; Ivy JL. J Appl Physiol.76(2):839-45, 1994.
    12. Volek JS, et al. Med. Sci. Sports Exerci. S182. Vol 30. 2000.
    13. Brand Miller J, Foster-Powell K, Colagiuri S, Leeds A. The GI factor. Hodder Publishing 1998.
    14. Dangin M et al. Am J. Physiol 280:E340-348, 2001.
    15. Bowtell JL, et al. J.App Physiol. 88:5;1529-1536, 2000.
    16. Maes M, et al. Acta Endocrinol. 117:320-326, 1988
    17. Yahya Z, et al. J. Endocrinol. S71, 1987
    18. Clemmons DR. Metabolism 34:391-395, 1983.
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    I'm curious as to how many times Max-OT or AST tried to pitch one of their products to you in that article?

    Dextrose is obviously a good form of PWO carb. However, it has nowhere near the nutritional value of oatmeal and your insulin levels will spike enough from the oatmeal where carbs will be shuttled into muscle cells along with other nutrients. If you are suppose to get between .3-.5g per LB PWO that would be nearly 100gr of dextrose for someone 200lbs or more. That is a ton of useless sugar. Not all of us are 168 rick
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagleman003 View Post
    I'm curious as to how many times Max-OT or AST tried to pitch one of their products to you in that article?

    Dextrose is obviously a good form of PWO carb. However, it has nowhere near the nutritional value of oatmeal and your insulin levels will spike enough from the oatmeal where carbs will be shuttled into muscle cells along with other nutrients. If you are suppose to get between .3-.5g per LB PWO that would be nearly 100gr of dextrose for someone 200lbs or more. That is a ton of useless sugar. Not all of us are 168 rick
    Who said you needed that much dextrose? I didn't. A person doesn't have to use dextrose, any carb with an high gi will do IMMEDIATELY post workout. I believe for example that if a person consumes 45% carbs daily that half of that should be consumed during post workout. All of it doesn't have to be high gi as stated in this article/study.

    My weight has nothing to do with this discussion.
  

  
 

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