What's your training philosophy?

  1. What's your training philosophy?


    Dave Tate does many many talks about knowing what your training philosophy is. He says it's the most vital part of your training and if you don't know what it is you aren't really moving towards anything. With that being said I would like to hear from everyone. What is your training philosophy?
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  2. I’m surprised nobody answered this. I’ve always been a bit of a workout drifter, not really moving in any particular direction. But I’ve thought a lot about being a calisthenics guy. I like how it’s totally bare bones, you can workout anywhere, any time. You could workout outdoors, when you take a hike or when your fishing or when your at the local park. I also like the body control and flexibility calisthenics people have. I find the lean athletic body it produces to be ideal as well. Traditionally, fighters typically stick to calisthenics. I’d have a hard time giving up the gym and weights though. I’d probably always keep that at least as small part of my routine.
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  3. Hey! It's been a while. You have the best topics!


    A philosophy of lifting.

    Ever since a young age, I found a peaceful place in the gym. It's more of a sanctuary to be respected. Church-like.
    The weights have a hum about them that vibrates when you lift them carefully and release them steadily in your hands.

    A combination of breathing, tensing and feeling the resistance as you focus on movement. It's a meditative state that
    resides inside and promotes strength and growth.

    It's given to release of power at the same time. I recall watching a philosopher speak to a room of students and sharing
    a few stories that relate directly to my fondness of lifting weights.

    He asked a the room, how much does this glass of water weigh?
    A few gave some of their best guesses.
    He entertained their angst with a long pause and stated: "It all depends on how long you have to hold it."

    The next was about a jar on his desk.
    He filled the jar with stones and then asked if the jar was full? Many agreed it was.

    He then took out a container with smaller stones and then put them in the jar until no more would fit.
    Is it full now? Again, many agreed, it was full.

    He then took out some sand, and then filled the jar with all the sand he could.
    Is it full now? More agreed and it was unanimous. Most of the room through it was full to capacity.

    He then put the glass of water next to the jar... there were audible gasps.
    He filled the rest of the jar with the water.

    That's my philosophy of living and lifting. Just when I think I've had enough, I later realize, I am now prepared to take on more than before. All this can be related back to a young man with too much energy and thankfully a healthy outlet.
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  4. Quote Originally Posted by justhere4comm View Post
    Hey! It's been a while. You have the best topics!


    A philosophy of lifting.

    Ever since a young age, I found a peaceful place in the gym. It's more of a sanctuary to be respected. Church-like.
    The weights have a hum about them that vibrates when you lift them carefully and release them steadily in your hands.

    A combination of breathing, tensing and feeling the resistance as you focus on movement. It's a meditative state that
    resides inside and promotes strength and growth.

    It's given to release of power at the same time. I recall watching a philosopher speak to a room of students and sharing
    a few stories that relate directly to my fondness of lifting weights.

    He asked a the room, how much does this glass of water weigh?
    A few gave some of their best guesses.
    He entertained their angst with a long pause and stated: "It all depends on how long you have to hold it."

    The next was about a jar on his desk.
    He filled the jar with stones and then asked if the jar was full? Many agreed it was.

    He then took out a container with smaller stones and then put them in the jar until no more would fit.
    Is it full now? Again, many agreed, it was full.

    He then took out some sand, and then filled the jar with all the sand he could.
    Is it full now? More agreed and it was unanimous. Most of the room through it was full to capacity.

    He then put the glass of water next to the jar... there were audible gasps.
    He filled the rest of the jar with the water.

    That's my philosophy of living and lifting. Just when I think I've had enough, I later realize, I am now prepared to take on more than before. All this can be related back to a young man with too much energy and thankfully a healthy outlet.
    I'm a big fan of a little Chaos and Pain.. hard to get into it cuz it's tough and hurts.. but once you become adapted and sack up to doin it.. the results and mentality were worth every minute of those nearly perpetual DOMS..

  5. Quote Originally Posted by justhere4comm View Post
    Hey! It's been a while. You have the best topics!


    A philosophy of lifting.

    Ever since a young age, I found a peaceful place in the gym. It's more of a sanctuary to be respected. Church-like.
    The weights have a hum about them that vibrates when you lift them carefully and release them steadily in your hands.

    A combination of breathing, tensing and feeling the resistance as you focus on movement. It's a meditative state that
    resides inside and promotes strength and growth.

    It's given to release of power at the same time. I recall watching a philosopher speak to a room of students and sharing
    a few stories that relate directly to my fondness of lifting weights.

    He asked a the room, how much does this glass of water weigh?
    A few gave some of their best guesses.
    He entertained their angst with a long pause and stated: "It all depends on how long you have to hold it."

    The next was about a jar on his desk.
    He filled the jar with stones and then asked if the jar was full? Many agreed it was.

    He then took out a container with smaller stones and then put them in the jar until no more would fit.
    Is it full now? Again, many agreed, it was full.

    He then took out some sand, and then filled the jar with all the sand he could.
    Is it full now? More agreed and it was unanimous. Most of the room through it was full to capacity.

    He then put the glass of water next to the jar... there were audible gasps.
    He filled the rest of the jar with the water.

    That's my philosophy of living and lifting. Just when I think I've had enough, I later realize, I am now prepared to take on more than before. All this can be related back to a young man with too much energy and thankfully a healthy outlet.
    Wait, so...was the jar ever filled?

    Or - was there ever really even a jar to begin with?
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