Core, How and How Often?

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  1. Its the roll out type work that will always leave you sore. The roll outs are an eccentric movement, and will induce the most muscle damage. Roll outs and dragon flags are a sure way to have sore abs the next day, but (as mentioned above) DOMS is not always an indicator of progression....


  2. I like to hit my core twice a week but i hit it kinda hard with 10x10 leg lifts and decline twist sit ups and always on leg day. Not sure why on the last part just feels good to finish legs with some good core work.
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  3. Fancy core work


    I've read a lot of posts describing days or hours dedicated solely to core work. My thoughts are as follows.

    1. Strong core is essential.
    2. Dedicated "core" exercises are often not needed and inefficient.
    3. I suggest for a strong core SQUAT heavy and often. Preferably front squats if core stability and strength are goals. Balance 315 or even 225 on traps for 3+ reps and then evaluate what worked core harder that or your fancy Russian plank or weighted plank. Another goodie is overhead squats.
    5. I guarantee someone who can front squat heavy has and will develop more core strength then someone who does legs bare minimum and devotes time to "core work"

  4. Quote Originally Posted by SURVIVALPRICE View Post
    I've read a lot of posts describing days or hours dedicated solely to core work. My thoughts are as follows.

    1. Strong core is essential.
    2. Dedicated "core" exercises are often not needed and inefficient.
    3. I suggest for a strong core SQUAT heavy and often. Preferably front squats if core stability and strength are goals. Balance 315 or even 225 on traps for 3+ reps and then evaluate what worked core harder that or your fancy Russian plank or weighted plank. Another goodie is overhead squats.
    5. I guarantee someone who can front squat heavy has and will develop more core strength then someone who does legs bare minimum and devotes time to "core work"
    I do not disagree that heavy, free weight squats and deadlifts will stress the core musculature; however, I tend to disagree that this is all you need.

    The major issue comes in developing and strengthening the deep stabilizer muscles in a way that will enhance the ability to squat and deadlift. This is especially important when there is an imbalance in strength between the global and local core, as there is in many strength athletes. And this is where bridge work becomes essential, in developing the local core.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by SURVIVALPRICE View Post
    I've read a lot of posts describing days or hours dedicated solely to core work. My thoughts are as follows.

    1. Strong core is essential.
    2. Dedicated "core" exercises are often not needed and inefficient.
    3. I suggest for a strong core SQUAT heavy and often. Preferably front squats if core stability and strength are goals. Balance 315 or even 225 on traps for 3+ reps and then evaluate what worked core harder that or your fancy Russian plank or weighted plank. Another goodie is overhead squats.
    5. I guarantee someone who can front squat heavy has and will develop more core strength then someone who does legs bare minimum and devotes time to "core work"
    I agree very much so with this but enjoy some core work and that is part of the reason I do wrap it in with my leg day. But I feel there is some need to target muscles specifically at some point and that's the other reason I do my core.
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  6. On my Off days 4x/week;
    30 weighted crunches using 10lb plate (10 reps each left/middle/right = 30 crunches)
    30 weighted leg raises using 10lb plate (10 reps each left/middle/right = 30 leg raises)
    60 second plank
    45 second side-plank x2
    Takes about 5 minutes total, maybe lil' more

  7. I actually agree with you when it come to more experienced lifters who have achieved a truly strong core from compound lifts like mentioned. Then it can be perfected with focus on minor improvements to stability and imbalances. I just feel a majority of lifters I see in many gyms think they can skip the true strength builders and focus on doing 30 sec or min long planks and get strong core... They will get real good at planks sure but true pick up heavy weight and lift it strength wont be achieved

  8. Quote Originally Posted by aLinux View Post
    On my Off days 4x/week;30 weighted crunches using 10lb plate (10 reps each left/middle/right = 30 crunches)30 weighted leg raises using 10lb plate (10 reps each left/middle/right = 30 leg raises)60 second plank45 second side-plank x2Takes about 5 minutes total, maybe lil' more
    U should do some research on crunches. They are not very good from a biomechancical standpoint for spine health and adding weights would not help. Your spine can take compressive force. It's designed for that. What's not good is compressive and shear forces acting together which is what a crunch when executed in an exhausted state can readily cause.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by SURVIVALPRICE View Post
    I actually agree with you when it come to more experienced lifters who have achieved a truly strong core from compound lifts like mentioned. Then it can be perfected with focus on minor improvements to stability and imbalances. I just feel a majority of lifters I see in many gyms think they can skip the true strength builders and focus on doing 30 sec or min long planks and get strong core... They will get real good at planks sure but true pick up heavy weight and lift it strength wont be achieved

    Excellent point made.

  10. bumping for good info!

  11. Quote Originally Posted by ZiR RED View Post
    I don't do very much trunk or hip flexion. I prefer to work the rectus abs via anti-extension (i.e.: roll outs).

    We can divide this into the local vs. global core. Local core are the deep (spinal in many cases) stabilizers that produce very little gross movements. These are postural muscles, and exhibit different levels of tone based upon position and load.

    Global would be the muscles that are [generally] more superficial, and produce more gross movements (trunk flexion, extension, rotation, etc.).

    Imbalances between the two are often what leads to injury, and often also what limits performance (or technique) during heavy load bearing movements. Generally, the imbalance goes global > local.

    I break the core movements down into something like this:

    Static (planks)
    Anti-extension/flexion (roll outs)
    Anti-rotation (pallof press)
    Rotation
    Flexion/extension
    Lateral flexion/extension

    My suggestion is to try and place a heavy emphasis on the statics and anti movements, working some form of them every other day. Then do rotation and trunk flexion once a week.
    This dude knows his stuff!! Props on a fantastic post!
    ​Athletic Xtreme Sponsored Athlete
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