What is a good bench max at a powerlifting meet

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    What is a good bench max at a powerlifting meet


    I weigh 157 im 5'9 what is a good bench weight to put up at a high school powerlifting meet

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    Quote Originally Posted by and_drew17 View Post
    I weigh 157 im 5'9 what is a good bench weight to put up at a high school powerlifting meet
    1,000 lbs.

    That would be seriously impressive.

    Real life. I would guess that not many in your weight class would break 250-300 for a high school meet.
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    I used to go to my old high school gym when I lived close to it,because I was cool with the coach which I had when young!those kids blew my mind,it's been a while,but at the time they were throwing around weight that I couldn't believe.its all the steroids in the chicken these days
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mack411 View Post
    I used to go to my old high school gym when I lived close to it,because I was cool with the coach which I had when young!those kids blew my mind,it's been a while,but at the time they were throwing around weight that I couldn't believe.its all the steroids in the chicken these days
    I still go back to mine to see the coaches when I'm on leave. (Plus free gym time) And some of those kids are MONSTERS, but a lot of them do take PH's (without knowing what they are or how to properly cycle) Omnevol was the popular one when I played.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbuick View Post
    I still go back to mine to see the coaches when I'm on leave. (Plus free gym time) And some of those kids are MONSTERS, but a lot of them do take PH's (without knowing what they are or how to properly cycle) Omnevol was the popular one when I played.
    Oh without a doubt,it blows my mind the things these kids take these days without learning the true effects it has on the body!when I was in school at one point there was a huge dbol wave,the whole football teem was on it.cant imagine what goes on there now!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mack411 View Post

    Oh without a doubt,it blows my mind the things these kids take these days without learning the true effects it has on the body!when I was in school at one point there was a huge dbol wave,the whole football teem was on it.cant imagine what goes on there now!
    I'm from Texas (outside of Houston) so football is a big deal. A lot of the time the parents buy steroids for their kids so that they can play college ball.

    It's ridiculous.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbuick View Post

    I'm from Texas (outside of Houston) so football is a big deal. A lot of the time the parents buy steroids for their kids so that they can play college ball.

    It's ridiculous.
    I'm from Houston as well but I moved to Conroe I dont know many kids that are on it I'm number 2 in all athletics it's a ranking system and I'm barely putting up 250 on a good day I'm 17 but yeah I was thinking about doing powerlifting I wanted to see how I would compare to others
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    That's good at your weight,I've seen better but I've seen a lot worse!
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    at your bodyweight here are the classifications:

    Class IV lifter - 197lbs
    Class III - 226lbs
    Class II - 258lbs
    Class I - 294lbs
    Masters - 329lbs
    Elite - 358lbs


    here is how to gauge the level of each:

    Elite: An exceptional lifter, for males this means the lifter is very likely in the top 10 in the nation for their respective weight class and the lifter may be close to a top 5 ranking among comparable federations for that competition year. For females this means the lifter is very likely in the top 5 in the nation for their respective weight class and the lifter may be close to a top 3 ranking among comparable federations for that competition year. Elite lifters generally place very well at local level competitions and will usually hold their own at National level competitions. It is not uncommon for Elite level lifters to have 10+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. Approximately 1% of competitive powerlifters will reach the Elite level of classification.

    Master: A very skilled lifter, for males this means the lifter is likely in the top 50 in the nation for their respective weight class among comparable federations for that year. For females this means the lifter is likely in the top 20 in the nation for their respective weight class among comparable federations for that competition year. Master lifters usually perform quite well at local level competitions and may want to think about competing on a National scale. Master lifters are likely to have 6+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. Approximately 10% of competitive powerlifters will reach the Master level of classification.

    Class I: A skilled lifter. A Class I lifter is significantly stronger than the average person that engages in regular intense weight training. Class I lifters are likely to have 4+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. A high percentage (~30%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class I level classification.

    Class II: A relatively skilled lifter. A Class II lifter is stronger than the average person that engages in regular intense weight training. Class II lifters are likely to have 3+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. A high percentage (~30%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class II level classification.

    Class III: A Class III lifter is stronger than the average person. Class III lifters are likely to have 2+ years of experience with hard resistance training. A reasonable number (~20%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class III level classification, this classification is common among teenage and upper level master lifters (50+ yrs old).

    Class IV: A Class IV lifter is at the beginning stage for a powerlifter. Class IV lifters are likely to have 1+ year of experience with hard resistance training. A smaller number (~10%) of competitive powerlifters compete at the Class IV level classification.
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    Quote Originally Posted by and_drew17 View Post

    I'm from Houston as well but I moved to Conroe I dont know many kids that are on it I'm number 2 in all athletics it's a ranking system and I'm barely putting up 250 on a good day I'm 17 but yeah I was thinking about doing powerlifting I wanted to see how I would compare to others
    Only way to know would be to go to a meet and see how you do.

    Also I'm willing to bet that more of the athletes there are on (or have cycled) than you would guess. Assuming you go to a larger school with a more prestigious athletic program (13-5A state contenders etc.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by asooneyeonig View Post
    at your bodyweight here are the classifications:

    Class IV lifter - 197lbs
    Class III - 226lbs
    Class II - 258lbs
    Class I - 294lbs
    Masters - 329lbs
    Elite - 358lbs

    here is how to gauge the level of each:

    Elite: An exceptional lifter, for males this means the lifter is very likely in the top 10 in the nation for their respective weight class and the lifter may be close to a top 5 ranking among comparable federations for that competition year. For females this means the lifter is very likely in the top 5 in the nation for their respective weight class and the lifter may be close to a top 3 ranking among comparable federations for that competition year. Elite lifters generally place very well at local level competitions and will usually hold their own at National level competitions. It is not uncommon for Elite level lifters to have 10+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. Approximately 1% of competitive powerlifters will reach the Elite level of classification.

    Master: A very skilled lifter, for males this means the lifter is likely in the top 50 in the nation for their respective weight class among comparable federations for that year. For females this means the lifter is likely in the top 20 in the nation for their respective weight class among comparable federations for that competition year. Master lifters usually perform quite well at local level competitions and may want to think about competing on a National scale. Master lifters are likely to have 6+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. Approximately 10% of competitive powerlifters will reach the Master level of classification.

    Class I: A skilled lifter. A Class I lifter is significantly stronger than the average person that engages in regular intense weight training. Class I lifters are likely to have 4+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. A high percentage (~30%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class I level classification.

    Class II: A relatively skilled lifter. A Class II lifter is stronger than the average person that engages in regular intense weight training. Class II lifters are likely to have 3+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. A high percentage (~30%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class II level classification.

    Class III: A Class III lifter is stronger than the average person. Class III lifters are likely to have 2+ years of experience with hard resistance training. A reasonable number (~20%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class III level classification, this classification is common among teenage and upper level master lifters (50+ yrs old).

    Class IV: A Class IV lifter is at the beginning stage for a powerlifter. Class IV lifters are likely to have 1+ year of experience with hard resistance training. A smaller number (~10%) of competitive powerlifters compete at the Class IV level classification.
    Thanks bro this Is really helpful I'll be using this in the future
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    Quote Originally Posted by asooneyeonig View Post
    at your bodyweight here are the classifications:

    Class IV lifter - 197lbs
    Class III - 226lbs
    Class II - 258lbs
    Class I - 294lbs
    Masters - 329lbs
    Elite - 358lbs

    here is how to gauge the level of each:

    Elite: An exceptional lifter, for males this means the lifter is very likely in the top 10 in the nation for their respective weight class and the lifter may be close to a top 5 ranking among comparable federations for that competition year. For females this means the lifter is very likely in the top 5 in the nation for their respective weight class and the lifter may be close to a top 3 ranking among comparable federations for that competition year. Elite lifters generally place very well at local level competitions and will usually hold their own at National level competitions. It is not uncommon for Elite level lifters to have 10+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. Approximately 1% of competitive powerlifters will reach the Elite level of classification.

    Master: A very skilled lifter, for males this means the lifter is likely in the top 50 in the nation for their respective weight class among comparable federations for that year. For females this means the lifter is likely in the top 20 in the nation for their respective weight class among comparable federations for that competition year. Master lifters usually perform quite well at local level competitions and may want to think about competing on a National scale. Master lifters are likely to have 6+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. Approximately 10% of competitive powerlifters will reach the Master level of classification.

    Class I: A skilled lifter. A Class I lifter is significantly stronger than the average person that engages in regular intense weight training. Class I lifters are likely to have 4+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. A high percentage (~30%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class I level classification.

    Class II: A relatively skilled lifter. A Class II lifter is stronger than the average person that engages in regular intense weight training. Class II lifters are likely to have 3+ years of experience with serious powerlifting training. A high percentage (~30%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class II level classification.

    Class III: A Class III lifter is stronger than the average person. Class III lifters are likely to have 2+ years of experience with hard resistance training. A reasonable number (~20%) of competitive powerlifters are at the Class III level classification, this classification is common among teenage and upper level master lifters (50+ yrs old).

    Class IV: A Class IV lifter is at the beginning stage for a powerlifter. Class IV lifters are likely to have 1+ year of experience with hard resistance training. A smaller number (~10%) of competitive powerlifters compete at the Class IV level classification.
    Thanks bro this is real helpful ill be using this in the future as well
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    Quote Originally Posted by and_drew17 View Post

    Thanks bro this Is really helpful I'll be using this in the future
    Quote Originally Posted by and_drew17 View Post

    Thanks bro this is real helpful ill be using this in the future as well
    They are the same quote?
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    225-250 would be pretty good.
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    Check out the bench technique articles from Tate and Pendlay. Someone has prob posted em here somewhere. Odds are there are technique changes you can make to increase your poundage at your current strength. Practice any new technique a lot before your meet. Jump in and do it. You'll only get stronger.
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    At least 225-250 would probably place you pretty high.
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    double bodyweight with a pause is excellent for any age and any wieght, that should be the goal.
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    Hundred pounds over body weight is good for your age! We had a powerlifting team when i was in high school. i topped at 320 but i was 181 class.. i think our 165er did like 275.. so you are being competitive in the raw classes for High Schoolers!!
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