new guy in need of advice - AnabolicMinds.com

new guy in need of advice

  1. New Member
    earl462's Avatar
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    new guy in need of advice


    To start out I'm 32 and have never lifted before. For the last 10 years I've been an endurance athlete; ultrarunning, ultracycling, triathalon... I've become very bored with the whole endurance thing and would like to get into powerlifting, strongman events, leaning more toward strongman. I'm 6 foot 162 pounds and about 8% fat. I'm very weak, my bench 5 rep max is 125, deadlift 185, squat 185. I just ordered Starting Strength and I just joined a gym. My goal is to be going to events by this time next year and being competitive. Can anyone give me any good advice on nutrition, lifting programs, work outside the gym, anything really. Oh by the way I'm a vegetarian, but do eat most dairy I just don't drink milk and no eggs or meat of any kind.
    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Earl

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    Ironhyde's Avatar
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    Can I ask why you're a vegetarian, Earl?
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    you will gain muscle but u being a vegetarian just wont show extreme results.

    im not quite certain but theres something in animal meat only that contains precursers for more growth. like a "growth protein", or a type of hormone? or sumtin like that.

    vegies just dont contain enough nutrition for someone who is considering powerlifiting. sorry.
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    And that's forgetting the 125lb max bench press. Without eating a lot of meat and/or juicing you've got an absolute minimum of 1 year's hard lifting and eating before you're even on the cusp of being in contention for small power lifting meets, as for strong man... Forget it for now.

    With the things missing from your diet you're going to find it *very* hard to pack on a large amount of LBM buddy, sorry.
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    Ironhyde's Avatar
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    Let's start with this as far as the importance of red meat in your diet...

    "Red meat (beef, pork, lamb, etc.) has been an important part of human diet for thousands of years. Yet, it became a "bad" food in the last few decades because of questionable studies that have linked it to heart disease and cancer.

    Red meat has red color because it contains a protein called myoglobin, which is similar to hemoglobin in the red blood cells. Both hemoglobin and myoglobin contain iron, an important trace mineral. The more active a muscle is, the more myoglobin it contains, and the more red color it has.

    Red meat also contains large quantities of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), which also has red color. CoQ10 is important for energy production. It is present in every cell of the body, but especially in those parts that need a lot of energy, such as muscles and the heart.
    Meat is a very good source of protein, iron, zinc, phosphorus, magnesium, selenium, and B vitamins, especially B1, B3, B6, and B12.

    Iron deficiency is pretty common, especially in women who lose iron every month during the menstrual period. Lack of iron can lead to anemia, which reduces the amount of oxygen delivered to the tissues and decreases the removal of carbon dioxide, a waste product. Iron is particularly important during pregnancy. Unfortunately, most pregnant women are deficient in iron.

    Zinc is an important mineral, it regulates about 80 different biological processes in the body, such as immune function, protein production, muscle building, digestion and metabolism, growth, and healing of wounds. Zinc deficiency is also pretty common.

    Meat and meat products, especially beef, are the primary sources of selenium in human diet. Selenium is essential to good health. It is used to make selenoproteins, which are important antioxidant enzymes that fight free radicals and prevent cellular damage. They even reduce the risk of cancer. Selenium is also important for normal thyroid hormone activity and for better immune function.

    Vitamins and minerals in meat are very bio-available. This means that they are easily absorbed and utilized by your body.

    But why do the "experts" recommend avoiding red meat? Why do they say that it increases the risk of heart disease and cancer?

    Because of ignorance, political correctness, and very questionable studies. Let me explain.

    Red meat is supposed to be bad for you because it contains a lot of cholesterol and saturated fat.

    Here are the facts. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Composition Handbook, 3 oz of beef contains 189 calories, 25.9 grams of protein (about one half to one third of daily requirement), 76 mg of cholesterol (we need about 1,500 to 2,000 mg every day), and 8.7 grams of fat. Only about a third of this fat is saturated. Almost half is mono-unsaturated (like in olive oil) and the rest are polyunsaturated, the kind of fats that are supposed to be good for cardiovascular health.

    Lastly, beef is a good source of CLA or conjugated linoleic acid, which has anti-cancer properties. According to medical studies, natural CLA reduces the risk of most cancers.

    Beef and red meat are excellent sources of important nutrients, many of which cannot be easily obtained from other food sources. Meat is not a poison. It is a nutritious food that can and should be used as part of a balanced diet."

    Not to mention all the amino acids and creatine that is found in red meat. These are essential for muscle growth and recovery, as well as immune system function.
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    walker11's Avatar
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    for training look at Ed Coans off season bench and squat/deadlift routine. it's a good program and i like it for my off season. but your diet is going hold you back, if getting into strength sports is important to you then you should think about eating some meat.
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    rckvl7's Avatar
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    As others have pointed out the not eating meat thing will make it tough. Is there any way you would at least drink milk? As in whole fat cows milk? Alot of milk along with plenty of protein supplements should help. You will also want to make sure you are taking a very good multi vitamin. A vegetarian often has special needs in that area, not sure what though.

    As for the training program Starting Strength is probably the best beginners program you can do. The book explains in great detail the correct technique and lays out an excellent program to follow. You can't go wrong with Starting Strength, the only thing that might hold you back is your diet.
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    Nice post.
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    earl462's Avatar
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    I became a vegetarian to help support my endurance training. I didn't eat meat not because I didn't like it but because it wasn't necessary for the sport. In fact most all of the top ultra runners in the world are vegetarians.
    Now that I'm moving away from ultra endurance sports and on to power lifting I will most definitely give meat a shot. Especially because of the overwhelming response that I'm wasting my time and won't see results if I don't consume meat. So, with that out of the way is there any other advise?
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    rckvl7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by earl462 View Post
    I became a vegetarian to help support my endurance training. I didn't eat meat not because I didn't like it but because it wasn't necessary for the sport. In fact most all of the top ultra runners in the world are vegetarians.
    Now that I'm moving away from ultra endurance sports and on to power lifting I will most definitely give meat a shot. Especially because of the overwhelming response that I'm wasting my time and won't see results if I don't consume meat. So, with that out of the way is there any other advise?
    Good. Eat plenty of protein, and even if you aren't going to be a vegetarian any more you still need a good multi-vitamin. You should also be supplementing with fish oil, and I myself like to supplement with extra calcium and vitamin D. Read Starting Strength and follow the basic program they have laid out in it. When that progress stalls(anywhere from 6 months to a year) I think 5/3/1 is an excellent program.

    And remember, strength takes time. Steady progress is the key, so don't injure yourself trying to up the weight too quickly. That doesn't mean don't train hard, just do it smart. Starting Strength actually tells you how the progression should occur.
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    Starting strength will be an excellent start for you. You'll learn proper technique of the big 3 lifts and there are some programming tips in there to put together a program for yourself. I usually don't like suggesting a 5x5 like everyone else always does for beginners, but I think in your case it may be beneficial for the first few months volume-wise. Just look up Madcow 5x5 and you'll find the program. You'll get lots of practice with all the lifts and build a solid base with that. After that you could move to something like the 5/3/1 program if you want since you'll be doing sets basically to failure with that program. I don't think that's a great way to start out, Madcow will build you up gradually and get you lots of technique practice along the way.

    I'm with everyone else on the meat thing, you just won't gain the strength and size you'll need without it. Milk and eggs are a must too in my opinion.

    Good luck.
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    In your case, Starting Strength is a perfect routine to build the base of strength you are wanting. Stay with the program for as long as you can and still make progress. Don't worry too much about your next program since you should be able to make progress on Starting Strength for a long time.
    Also make sure you are eating enough to gain weight through this process. The weight gain will help with strength gain and will help you make progress longer on Starting Strength. The meat issue has already been covered, so I won't rehash it.
  

  
 

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