What does Gyno look like?

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    What does Gyno look like?


    Hi guys I was just wondering if anyone could tell me what the signs of gyno are?

    Sorry if this question has been beat to death but I am curious.

    My right nipple was sore for a few days, and now it seems to be puffier than my left one and a little bigger, not sure if it was gyno or not.

    I was taking M1T and started taking 6-OXo as soon as my nipples became sore. no Nolva as i cant get it here in Canada easily.

    Any help is appreciated

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    chances are you are getting gyno from the m1t, and sadly, 6-oxo won't do anything to prevent it.

    in fact nothing will other than nolva or raloxifene

    some people claim that m1t gyno can be stopped by using a prolactin inhibitor such as dostinex, or bromocriptine, but those are also prescription.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OmarJackson
    chances are you are getting gyno from the m1t, and sadly, 6-oxo won't do anything to prevent it.

    in fact nothing will other than nolva or raloxifene

    some people claim that m1t gyno can be stopped by using a prolactin inhibitor such as dostinex, or bromocriptine, but those are also prescription.
    There has been great feeback about Rebound XT. Both preventing and reducing existing gyno. Also the SEARCH button will answer a plethora of questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by darius
    I can't believe that you haven't been banned yet for stupidity. But anyways, this should shut you up for a while:

    J Pediatr. 2004 Jul;145(1):71-6. Related Articles, Links
    Beneficial effects of raloxifene and tamoxifen in the treatment of pubertal gynecomastia.

    Lawrence SE, Faught KA, Vethamuthu J, Lawson ML.

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. slawrence@cheo.on.ca

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of the anti-estrogens tamoxifen and raloxifen in the medical management of persistent pubertal gynecomastia. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review of 38 consecutive patients with persistent pubertal gynecomastia who presented to a pediatric endocrinology clinic. Patients received reassurance alone or a 3- to 9-month course of an estrogen receptor modifier (tamoxifen or raloxifene). RESULTS: Mean (SD) age of treated subjects was 14.6 (1.5) years with gynecomastia duration of 28.3 (16.4) months. Mean reduction in breast nodule diameter was 2.1 cm (95% CI 1.7, 2.7, P <.0001) after treatment with tamoxifen and 2.5 cm (95% CI 1.7, 3.3, P <.0001) with raloxifene. Some improvement was seen in 86% of patients receiving tamoxifen and in 91% receiving raloxifene, but a greater proportion had a significant decrease (>50%) with raloxifene (86%) than tamoxifen (41%). No side effects were seen in any patients. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of estrogen receptor action in the breast appears to be safe and effective in reducing persistent pubertal gynecomastia, with a better response to raloxifene than to tamoxifen. Further study is required to determine that this is truly a treatment effect.

    PMID: 15238910 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]------------------------------------------- Breast. 2004 Feb;13(1):61-5. Related Articles, Links
    Management of physiological gynaecomastia with tamoxifen.

    Khan HN, Rampaul R, Blamey RW.

    Professorial Unit of Surgery, Department of Surgery, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK. hamimi@dsl.pipex.com

    AIMS: We aimed to confirm suggestions that tamoxifen therapy alone may resolve physiological gynaecomastia. METHODS: A prospective audit of the outcome of tamoxifen routinely given to men with physiological gynaecomastia was carried out at Nottingham. Men referred with gynaecomastia had clinical signs recorded, e.g., type (diffuse 'fatty' or retro-areolar 'lump'), size and possible aetiology. They were offered oral tamoxifen 20mg once daily for 6-12 weeks. On follow-up patients were assessed for complete resolution (CR), partial resolution where patient is satisfied with outcome (PR) or no resolution (NR). Success was either CR or PR. RESULTS: Thirty-six men accepted tamoxifen for physiological gynaecomastia. Median age was 31 (range 18-64). Tenderness was present in 25 (71%) cases. Sixteen men (45%) had 'fatty' gynaecomastia and 20 had 'lump' gynaecomastia. Tamoxifen resolved the mass in 30 patients (83.3%; CR=22, PR=8) and tenderness in 21 cases (84%; CR=0, PR=0). Lump gynaecomastia was more responsive to tamoxifen than the fatty type (100% vs. 62.5%; P=0.0041). CONCLUSIONS: Oral tamoxifen is an effective treatment for physiological gynaecomastia, especially for the lump type.

    Publication Types:
    • Clinical Trial
    -----------------------------------------

    Tamoxifen treatment for pubertal gynecomastia.

    Derman O, Kanbur NO, Kutluk T.

    Section of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, 06100 Ankara-Turkey. drderman@hotmail.com

    We evaluated the efficacy of the tamoxifen treatment in 37 patients with pubertal gynecomastia. All had distinct, easily palpable breast swellings with a diameter of over three cm. Pain, tenderness, and swelling associated with gynecomastia were reported by six patients. Eight of the patients were obese. One patient also suffered from varicocele. Pain and size reduction was seen in all patients with tamoxifen treatment. No long-term side effects of tamoxifen were observed. The dose of tamoxifen was increased in three patients due to poor response. Two of the treatment group had recurrence problem at follow-up. We did not need to refer any patient to surgery. Tamoxifen treatment is relatively non-toxic, may be beneficial and we think it should be considered for pubertal gynecomastia.

    PMID: 14719418 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    ------------------------------------------
    Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2003 Mar;12(3):337-51. Related Articles, Links
    The therapeutic potential of aromatase inhibitors.

    Miller WR, Jackson J.

    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Breast Unit Research Group, Paderewski Building, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, EH4 2XU, UK. w.r.miller@ed.ac.uk

    The third generation aromatase inhibitors are both remarkably potent and specific endocrine agents inhibiting aromatase activity and reducing circulating oestrogen levels in postmenopausal women to levels never previously seen. Their therapeutic potential is consequently much greater than the earlier prototype drugs. Their excellent side-effect profile also allows for potential wider indications in the treatment of oestrogen-related diseases, including breast cancer. It still remains to determine whether their potent endocrine effects translate into increased therapeutic benefit. In advanced breast cancer, aromatase inhibitors have been shown to have improved efficacy and toxicity profiles when compared with progestins, aminoglutethimide and tamoxifen. Aromatase inhibitors have also been used in the neoadjuvant setting, where they have been shown to achieve higher response rates than tamoxifen and to be more successful at downstaging tumours. Early results comparing an aromatase inhibitor with tamoxifen in the adjuvant setting in early breast cancer show anastrozole to be superior to tamoxifen in terms of both disease-free survival and a lower incidence of new contralateral tumours. There was also a more favourable side-effect profile, which has implications for potential future prophylactic treatment. Additionally, since aromatase inhibitors have different mechanisms of action, unlike antioestrogens, they may be particularly useful as chemopreventive agents if oestrogens are themselves genotoxic. Aromatase inhibitors have been used to date almost exclusively in postmenopausal women. The potential of combining them with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone analogues allows the possibility of treating premenopausal women with either oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer or benign conditions such as cyclical breast pain, fibroadenomata, recurrent cystic disease or endometriosis. There is also the potential for their use in men with conditions such as gynaecomastia or prostate cancer. These new generation aromatase inhibitors may well have an increasing role in the future management of a number of conditions in addition to breast cancer.

    Publication Types:
    • Review
    • Review, Tutorial
    PMID: 12605559 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] -------------------------------------------


    Gynecomastia. A bothersome but readily treatable problem.

    Jacobs MB.

    Division of General Internal Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305-5320.

    Although breast enlargement in boys and men can cause both psychological and physical distress, the disorder is rarely serious and is readily treatable. Several factors can lead to the estrogenic excess that causes growth of breast tissue. Dr Jacobs describes a patient with gynecomastia related to cirrhosis of the liver who responded promptly to a brief course of tamoxifen citrate therapy.

    Publication Types:
    • Case Reports
    ------------------------------------------


    [Treatment of marked gynecomastia in puberty with tamoxifen]

    [Article in German]

    Konig R, Schonberger W, Neumann P, Benes P, Grimm W.

    Kinderklinik, Universitat Mainz.

    Based on the good results of another author 10 boys with marked pubertal gynecomastia were treated with the antioestrogen Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) at a dose of 20-40 mg/d orally for 2-12 months. In most cases the gynecomastia decreased totally, only two patients experienced palpable subareolar glandular tissue at the end of therapy. Side effects were not noted. During therapy levels of estradiol and testosteron increased, with a more pronounced elevation of estradiol. Basal values of LH and FSH remained nearly unchanged, but LH showed an increased response to LH-RH, which could be explained by the antioestrogenic effect of Tamoxifen at the hypothalamic level. The reduction of breast size in spite of increased estradiol levels on the other hand, suggests that the mean therapeutic effect of tamoxifen is through estrogen receptor blockade of breast tissue.

    PMID: 3123765 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    -----------------------------------------

    Clin Ther. 1987;9(5):483-7. Related Articles, Links
    Idiopathic gynecomastia treated with tamoxifen: a preliminary report.

    Alagaratnam TT.

    Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong.

    Sixty-one Chinese men with idiopathic gynecomastia were treated with 40 mg of tamoxifen daily for one of four months (median, two months). Eighty percent had complete regression of their breast swelling. No long-term side effects of tamoxifen were observed over a median follow-up period of 36 months.

    PMID: 3664552 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] ----------------------------------------

    Metabolism. 1986 Aug;35(8):705-8. Related Articles, Links
    Treatment of gynecomastia with tamoxifen: a double-blind crossover study.

    Parker LN, Gray DR, Lai MK, Levin ER.

    Benign asymptomatic or painful enlargement of the male breast is a common problem, postulated to be due to an increased estrogen/testosterone ration or due to increased estrogenic or decreased androgenic stimulation via estrogen or androgen receptor interactions. Treatment at present consists of analgesic medication or surgery. However, treatment directed against the preponderance of estrogenic stimulation would seem to represent a more specific form of therapy. In the present double-blind crossover study, one-month courses of a placebo or the antiestrogen tamoxifen (10 mg given orally bid) were compared in random order. Seven of ten patients experienced a decrease in the size of their gynecomastia due to tamoxifen (P less than 0.005). Overall, the decrease for gynecomastia for the whole group was significant (P less than 0.01). There was no beneficial effect of placebo (P greater than 0.1). Additionally, all four patients with painful gynecomastia experienced symptomatic relief. There was no toxicity. The reduction of breast size was partial and may indicate the need for a longer course of therapy. A followup examination was performed in eight out of ten patients nine months to one year after discontinuing placebo and tamoxifen. There were no significant changes from the end of the initial study period except for one tamoxifen responder who developed a recurrence of breast tenderness after six months, and one nonresponder who demonstrated an increase in breast size and a new onset of tenderness after ten months. Therefore, antiestrogenic treatment with tamoxifen may represent a safe and effective mode of treatment for selected cases of cosmetically disturbing or painful gynecomastia.

    Publication Types:
    • Clinical Trial
    • Randomized Controlled Trial
    PMID: 3526085 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] -------------------------------------------
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    If its just puffy your fine. It will go away on its own. If you have gyno you will be able to feel a hard lump under your nipple.
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    http://www.plasticsurgery4u.com/proc...ybuilders.html
    This link shows some good pics. Hope it helps.- Witty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jstrong20
    If its just puffy your fine. It will go away on its own. If you have gyno you will be able to feel a hard lump under your nipple.
    There are different kinds of gyno, including something called psyudo gyno, which consists of itchy, puffy nips. This is very common for people on cycle, and depending on what you're taking, it is usually caused by estrogen and not prolactin. A good way to help reduce the puffyness and stop the itching is to try raloxifene and an AI such as letrozole or an ATD product if you cant get letro. I suggest that you use raloxifene instead of nolva while on cycle to combat this issue due to its positive effects on lipids and little to no liver toxicity. Meaning you can take 240mg ED for a while and not worry about hurting yourself. I myself am using it right now along with ATD to combat the exact same thing while on my Emax cycle. It has worked like a charm. If you need anymore clarification on how to combat this, please ask, there are many people on this board with experience on how to combat itchy, puffy nips. I myself can just share my experiences and solutions: raloxifene at 240mg and ATD at 75mgED for 5 days, then start to drop down after that if it goes away.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sky9
    There are different kinds of gyno, including something called psyudo gyno, which consists of itchy, puffy nips. This is very common for people on cycle, and depending on what you're taking, it is usually caused by estrogen and not prolactin. A good way to help reduce the puffyness and stop the itching is to try raloxifene and an AI such as letrozole or an ATD product if you cant get letro. I suggest that you use raloxifene instead of nolva while on cycle to combat this issue due to its positive effects on lipids and little to no liver toxicity. Meaning you can take 240mg ED for a while and not worry about hurting yourself. I myself am using it right now along with ATD to combat the exact same thing while on my Emax cycle. It has worked like a charm. If you need anymore clarification on how to combat this, please ask, there are many people on this board with experience on how to combat itchy, puffy nips. I myself can just share my experiences and solutions: raloxifene at 240mg and ATD at 75mgED for 5 days, then start to drop down after that if it goes away.
    should i be trying ATD, my puffyness went down with use of nolva after 2 weeks/40mg, but the itchness is still there? if so could you give me a link,thanks,

    b
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripple7501
    I was taking M1T and started taking 6-OXo as soon as my nipples became sore. no Nolva as i cant get it here in Canada easily.

    Any help is appreciated
    For fast and easy access in Canada (legal), you can get ATD. You can get Gaspari's Novedex at s n d. A couple of other sites also carry DS's Rebound XT.

    M1T is pretty suppressive though. You may want to look into some "grey area" PCT in addition to ATD.
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    Ive had a lump since about the first week of my cycle. Im now apporaching the finish of my 10th week. Currently ive been running nolva at 100mg's. Ive been running nolva or atd the whole cycle.

    I don"t have anything that resembles the pictures in terms of puffyness, but i've had this lump the whole time.

    I had a similar lump when i was much younger.
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    once the gland is removed, does that mean you can no longer get gyno and wont need to really worry about AI's so much on cycle aside from water retention issues
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripple7501
    What does Gyno look like?
    Looks bad.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drachus
    once the gland is removed, does that mean you can no longer get gyno and wont need to really worry about AI's so much on cycle aside from water retention issues
    They leave a tiny amount of the gland in there for some reason.

    I've had gyno surgery a few years ago (pubertal), and recently on a test cycle I was taking 10mg of nolva ed since I thought I was prone to gyno. Then I thought I shouldn't be taxing my liver for a long-ass period of time and I felt like I wouldn't get gyno even if I stopped the nolva. I stopped it and nothing happened. I think you don't have to worry too much after surgery since they take most of the gland.

    Having nolva ready is a must though, you never know what's gonna happen.
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    thanks
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